San Antonio Spurs v Miami Heat - Game 6

Refs say Rick Barry is wrong, Ray Allen didn’t travel on critical shot in Game 6 of Finals


Ray Allen’s shot at the end of regulation to send Game 6 of the Finals into overtime was as clutch as they come, especially considering those now famous yellow ropes in place along the sidelines that were there in preparation for the Spurs’ trophy presentation.

NBA Hall-of-Famer Rick Barry has turned it into a mini-controversy this summer, however, claiming in multiple interviews that Allen traveled before delivering the breathtaking shot.

The NBA’s referees, who are gathered in New Jersey this week for their annual preseason summit, politely disagree with Barry’s assessment.

From Brian Windhorst of

On Thursday the league invited some members of the media to look at some of the work the officials have been doing and discuss some minor rule changes and adjustments. But one thing that came up was Allen’s huge shot. Was it or wasn’t it a travel?

The answer from the best in the world was definitive: No.

Barry and others feel that Allen took three steps, one more than allotted, before shooting the ball. Looking at it frame-by-frame, indeed there is some gray area there. Under league rules, a player is permitted two steps after the “gather.”

Whether you side with Barry or with the officials on the issue depends on when you believe Allen began his so-called gather.

For what it’s worth, Kurt Helin pointed this out in our original post on the subject, and ended up seeing it the same way the referees did.

The NBA rule on traveling was described by the league this way:

A player who receives the ball while moving is allowed a two count rhythm but must release the ball prior to the third step touching the floor.

Does Allen take a third step? Looking at the replay I don’t think so. The NBA allows a “gather” and two steps and Allen is well within that.

The conclusion by those in the officiating profession won’t change Barry’s or anyone else’s opinion, of course. But if nothing else, the assessment of the referees should be weighted more heavily than those on the outside when considering the differing views.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.