Rick Pitino

Rick Pitino thinks Brad Stevens is a perfect fit for the Boston Celtics

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SPRINGFIELD, Mass. — Brad Stevens was introduced as the Boston Celtics new coach in early July. The former Butler head coach is making the daring jump, leaving the college ranks for the NBA. In the past, this has not gone well for many great collegiate coaches.

John Calipari lasted three seasons in New Jersey and Rick Pitino, who was successful with the New York Knicks, had a 102-146 record in three-plus seasons with the Boston Celtics. Just a reminder, these are the last two head coaches to win the national championship.

Despite the lack of success from coaches in the past, Pitino believes that Stevens will be able to make the transition as the head coach of Celtics.

“It’s all about your personality,” Pitino said during the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame press conference on Saturday afternoon.

“Brad Stevens is a perfect fit, perfect, couldn’t be more of a perfect fit to go from college to the pros. He runs pro offense. He runs a pro defense.”

Pitino left his post at Providence College for the Knicks opening in 1987. But even before he became the head coach at PC, he was an assistant under Hubie Brown in New York.  Serving as an NBA assistant coach was considered a prerequisite to being an NBA head coach in Pitino’s mind. Although, he sees Stevens as an exception to that rule.

“I spent two years with Hubie Brown as an assistant, that prepared me,” Pitino said.

“It’s so foreign. It’s such a foreign game, the pros to college. That is an adjustment that’s difficult to make unless you’ve been there. Brad is one of the few people I think can do it. I think Coach K can do it because of his Olympic experience. But it’s very difficult to do unless you have experience as an assistant.”

Stevens is a great X’s-and-O’s coach. He has also been on the forefront of the advanced statistic movement in the game of basketball, which includes his analytic specialist Drew Cannon. The rise in the in-depth basketball statistics is something that Pitino himself has noticed during the course of the summer.

While speaking with several professional scouts, Pitino was presented with Peyton Siva’s shooting percentages. It was broken down, not by makes or misses, but into segments, indicating what areas on the floor Siva shoots the best from.

“I was a little blown away by that,” Pitino said.

“The Oklahoma City Thunder, as well as seven, eight other teams in the NBA have adopted the version of baseball’s ‘Moneyball.’ They’re doing it, and before you know it 28 of the 30 teams in the league [will use it], and then it will filter down to college.”

Stevens was given a six-year deal by Boston, worth $22 million. So like Pitino, Danny Ainge and Co. have faith in the 36-year-old head coach that guided Butler to back-to-back national title games.

As for Pitino, he’s made the jump to the NBA twice, one good stint, one bad stint, though the college game has suited him just fine. It’s led him to Final Fours at three different schools, a pair of national titles, and oh yeah a spot in the Hall of Fame’s Class of 2013.

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PBT Extra: Who do you want to see most in first All-Star Game?

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Tonight the NBA All-Star Game starters will be announced. Then the coaches have a week to vote and the rest of the roster will be put together by them.

This year should see a few first-time All-Stars, guys bursting on the scene and grabbing fans attention — so we asked people on Twitter who they most wanted to see in his first All-Star Game and I break it down in this PBT Extra.

The winner? Giannis Antetokounmpo with 45 percent of the vote. Which shouldn’t be a surprise, he’s second in the fan voting for the frontcourt in the East (behind only LeBron James). Good news for those fans, the Greek Freak is almost guaranteed to be a starter, he’s getting plenty of media votes and likely a lot from the players as well.

Second place in the poll? Joel Embiid of the Sixers. I’d love to see him, but will players and media members vote in a guy on a minutes restriction? Will the coaches pick him for that same reason? He is on the bubble.

Russell Westbrook: ‘Don’t say what’s up to that b— a—’ (video)

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Did Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant talk during the Warriors’ win over the Thunder last night? Westbrook said no, though video and first-hand accounts indicate otherwise.

Even more clearly: Westbrook – who walked near teammates Enes Kanter, Anthony Morrow and Jerami Grant – didn’t want someone talking to someone as they left the floor after the game. ESPN caught Westbrook saying, “Don’t say what’s up to that b— a—.”

You will never convince anyone Westbrook is referring to anyone but Durant.

Russell Westbrook commits epic travel (video)

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Between getting laid out by Zaza Pachulia and apparently talking with Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook committed a travel for the ages.

The Thunder guard took an inbound pass against the Warriors and just started walking up court without dribbling. The violation was so blatant, NBA officials even called the travel.

And it’s not as if they’re inclined to blow a whistle in that situation. Before Westbrook, Kemba Walker set a high bar last season, but he got away with this walk:

Are Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant on speaking terms after apparent conversation? Westbrook: ‘Nah’ (video)

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Russell Westbrook deleted Kevin Durant‘s goodbye text and, months later, told the whole world they still hadn’t talked.

That apparently changed during the Warriors’ win over the Thunder yesterday – though not if you ask Westbrook.

Westbrook dunked in the third quarter, and according to ESPN commentator Mark Jackson, Westbrook told Durant, “Don’t jump.” Anthony Slater of The Mercury News also wrote of the same quote.

ESPN’s telecast caught Durant clearly speaking to Westbrook shortly after. It appears Westbrook is talking back, but his back is to the camera.

After the game, Westbrook denied the exchange:

 

  • Reporter: “Are you and KD on speaking terms?”
  • Westbrook: “Nah.”
  • Reporter: “You guys had a little exchange in the third quarter.”
  • Westbrook: “What exchange?”
  • Reporter: “You and KD said something to each other.”
  • Westbrook: “Oh. You gotta maybe sit closer to the game. You maybe didn’t see clearly.”

This is so Westbrook – stubborn to the point of denying reality.

That approach worked for him when everyone rightly told him he was a significantly lesser player than Durant. Westbrook ignored that fact until it became false.

I suspect he wants to forget this exchange so he can maintain a cold animosity toward someone he prefers to resent.