San Antonio Spurs v Miami Heat - Game 6

Rick Barry says Ray Allen travelled on key Game 6 three

23 Comments

Talk with a group of basketball fans – it doesn’t have to be too large – and discuss that play, Michael Jordan’s final shot with the Bulls, the basket that won the 1998 NBA Finals over the Jazz.

Someone will claim Jordan pushed off Bryon Russell.*

Unlike nearly every other all-time great shot in NBA history, Jordan’s step-back jumper comes with a controversy. Some view it as tainted because of the non-call, especially because of the wide perception Jordan got superstar calls.

*Personally, I thought Russell was off balance and when Jordan touched him to an allowable degree, Russell fell. So, no foul should have been called. But it was close.

But nearly every one of the NBA’s most iconic shots are completely untainted. Jordan over Ehlo, Jerry West’s heave, Gar Heard’s Shot Hear Round The World, Ray Allen’s Allen’s 3-pointer that tied Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals

Hold it right there, says Rick Barry.

The Hall of Famer in a Q&A with Surya Fernandez of Hot Hot Hoops:

What are your general thoughts on the Miami Heat championship and the 2013 NBA Finals?

They were very fortunate to win the championship. They had a great season, had that incredible run with all those consecutive victories which I don’t care where you’re playing or who you’re playing against, that’s still a great accomplishment. They were fortunate enough to be able to repeat as champions which is a very difficult thing to do. They got a little help from San Antonio and from an official who swallowed his whistle on Ray Allen’s travel on the 3-point shot that tied the game in Game 6. Otherwise the Spurs would have been the champions and nobody talks much about that. But that’s a part of what happens in the game and you have to credit them for responding as they did and being able to come away with a victory.

You just mentioned that you think Ray Allen travelled on that corner 3 at the end of Game 6…

There’s no question about it, just watch the replay that they showed from the overhead camera. He catches the ball with one foot down, steps back, brings the foot that he had down back to shoot the ball. That’s traveling, you can’t move your pivot foot without dribbling.

Do you think the ref saw that and chose not to interfere with such an important moment of a championship game or did it happen so quickly Allen’s shuffle to that spot looked legit?

It happened so quickly that the official just saw Ray doing it and he was looking down probably just to see if he got behind the three-point arc. It was a great shot, but they didn’t call it so it doesn’t matter. They got away with it, so lucky them.

Here’s the video:

I just don’t see the travel.

In the replay that begins at 28 seconds, it appears Allen’s left foot it is planted behind the arc when he catches the ball. Then, leaving his left foot planted, he brings his right foot back, elevates and shoots. However, the referee is partially blocking that view, so it’s difficult to say conclusively he didn’t travel.

The angle the Barry seems to be referring to begins at 38 seconds. Because it’s an overhead view, it’s difficult to tell when Allen’s feet are on the court or just off it. Best I can tell, though, Allen catches the ball with his right foot on the floor inside the arc and left foot in the air. He plants his left foot behind the arc and then brings his right foot back behind the arc, too.

The applicable NBA rule:

A player who receives the ball while moving is allowed a two count rhythm but must release the ball prior to the third step touching the floor.

Moving his left back was count one, and moving his right foot back was beat two. Then, he shoots. I think he’s OK.

I don’t precisely see the play the same way on each angle, which obviously speaks to how imperfect our view is. But no matter how I’ve looked at it, I don’t see a travel, either.

Stephen Curry skips pass between DeAndre Jordan’s legs, gets Zaza Pachulia a layup (video)

Leave a comment

Nicolas Batum wasn’t the only player to bounce a pass through an opponent’s legs last night.

Stephen Curry nutmegged DeAndre Jordan on this sweet assist to Zaza Pachulia.

Clint Capela and Montrezl Harrell take turns dunking on Julius Randle (videos)

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 05:  Head Coach Luke Walton of the Los Angeles Lakers talks with Julius Randle #30 during the second half of a 107-101 Jazz win at Staples Center on December 5, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Rough night for the Lakers, who lost 134-95 to the Rockets.

It was particularly harsh for Julius Randle, who got dunked on by Clint Capela:

And then Montrezl Harrell:

Giannis Antetokounmpo called for 10-second violation on free throw (video)

2 Comments

This Giannis Antetokounmpo 10-second violation was a year in the making.

Unfortunately for the Trail Blazers, it was too little, too late. Antetokounmpo still finished with 15 points, 12 rebounds, 11 assists, four blocks and two steals in the Bucks’ 115-107 win.

Iman Shumpert injures hand while missing open dunk (video)

Leave a comment

Plenty went right for the Cavaliers in their 126-94 win over the Knicks last night, but there were a few snags.

LeBron James and his teammates repeatedly failed the water-bottle challenge in the closing moments (though Kyrie Irving eventually nailed it).

Kevin Love‘s nose malfunctioned.

And Iman Shumpert injured his hand while missing an open dunk.

If Shumpert was faking as an excuse for missing, he sold it hard. Defending 4-on-5 on the other end, Cleveland ceded a 3-pointer. Then, Shumpert remained hunched over while the Cavs brought the ball up-court. It seems Shumpert might have been popping back in a dislocated finger, which jibes with him staying in the game – and shows his toughness.

But it also doesn’t erase the shame of hurting yourself while missing an open dunk.