Wednesday And-1 links: Updates on Liggins, White domestic violence cases

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Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points more than Slovenian basketball fans love Goran Dragic right now (he carried them to a EuroBasket win)…

• The details of the incident that led to the DeAndre Liggins domestic assault charges have come out and it is ugly. According to court documents obtained by the Oklahoman, Liggins’ girlfriend said the Thunder player “hit her in the head with his hand and then punched her in the head when she fell on the ground” and all of that in front of their 2-year-old son. After that the woman locker herself in her bedroom but “Liggins reportedly kicked in the door, pushed her down, dropped a fan on her, stomped her with his foot and dropped an Xbox on her head.”

This is all still alleged, but if true the court should not be lenient in this case.

• While we are on this ugly topic, current Sixers Royce White (who has yet to play in the NBA) is under investigation for a domestic violence situation, reports TMZ. I’d say this would hurt White’s chances of ever getting on an NBA court, but I don’t think those chances were all that good anyway.

The business school at Emory University did a study and ranking of the social media equity among NBA teams. The top five (in order): Lakers, Heat, Celtics, Bobcats, Warriors. Dead last are your Los Angeles Clippers.

Dave McMenamin of ESPNLA with a fantastic story on Lamar Odom and why so many people around the league are rooting for him. Very emotional, personal stuff that couldn’t have been easy to write.

• The Kamanetzky Brothers had Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers on their podcast to talk Kobe Bryant, Mike D’Antoni and all things Lakers. Plus some Big Lebowski. They all wore socks during the making of the podcast, you can decide where for yourself.

Forcing a lot of turnovers on defense doesn’t seem to help your offense as much as you would think (the idea is easy baskets in transition, but not so much).

• The smart bloggers over at Sports Illustrated take a look at the bubble playoff teams out there now. I’m with them that I think the Lakers miss the cut because their defense will be bad.

• Make of this whatever you want, but know he will get teased about this in the Nuggets locker room.

• Landry Fields is still trying to rehab from his elbow injury and as part of that has restructured his shot.

• Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson and the team trying to build a new arena for the Kings in Sacramento announced Wednesday a new deal with the area construction unions on getting the project build. For those of you who love bureaucratic jargon it is a “Community Workforce and Training Agreement” and it covers the hiring and oversight of the more than 3,000 workers expected on the project. Part of the deal is that 60% of construction workers and 70% of apprentices get hired from the City of Sacramento and surrounding region. Which seems fair. This is all just another sign that project is moving along well.

• Andre Drummond is dating Jennette McCurdy. If you don’t know who McCurdy is, go ask your tween daughter.

• Here’s a long look at the future salary obligations of the 76ers, and how much room GM Sam Hinkie could have going forward. I think this takes an optimistic attitude, for example I think the Sixers may well let Evan Turner become a restricted free agent then keep him at a lower price (he might be wise to take the qualifying offer rather than the pay cut).

• Over at TrueHoop, they have been taking a long look at ways to reduce tanking (know now tanking is going to be a big story the second half of this coming season). There are ideas such as the ludicrous tournament of non-playoff teams, but I still think the best way is to say every team that doesn’t make the playoffs has the same chance in the lottery — last season in the East the nine-seed Sixers and 15-seed Magic would have the same lottery odds. That way, no reason to be super terrible. Nothing will eliminate tanking (even in my scenario this season the 8 seed team may try to tank into the lottery rather than just get crushed by the Heat/Thunder/whoever are the top seeds) but this will stop some teams from dumping all talent to get as bad as they can.

• For the second straight year, Toronto’s Jonas Valanciunas was  named the 2012 FIBA Europe Young Men’s Player of the Year.

AP source: Justin Zanik, David Morway join Jazz front office

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A person with knowledge of the situation says the Utah Jazz have reached agreements with Justin Zanik and David Morway to join the front office.

Zanik returns to the Jazz after serving as assistant general manager from 2012-16, the person told The Associated Press on Friday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the decisions had not been formally announced.

Zanik, a former agent, had been hired as assistant general manager with the Milwaukee Bucks and was expected to succeed general manager John Hammond one day. Hammond was named GM of Orlando Magic in May and the Bucks eventually hired Jon Horst.

Morway was the Pacers’ GM from 2008-12 and Bucks assistant GM from 2013-15. He spent 13 years in the Indiana front office, starting as vice president of basketball administration.

ESPN first reported the agreements.

Former Gatorade executive auctioning off Michael Jordan memorabilia

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Remember the “Be Like Mike” Gatorade commercials back in the 1990s?

That was the brain child of Bill Schmidt, a now retired VP of Marketing of Gatorade. Over the years he formed a friendship with Michael Jordan, and in the process racked up a treasure trove of Jordan memorabilia — jerseys, game-worn shoes, even game-worn baseball cleats from Jordan’s time in the minors. Almost all of it signed.

Now it’s all being auctioned off, Schmidt told Sole Collector.

“I turn 70 at the end of the year and I’m in good health, knock on wood. If something happens to me, I don’t know what they are going to do with this stuff,” Schmidt told Sole Collector. “Somebody else can enjoy it. It would afford me the opportunity to take care of some other people and other causes as opposed to donating the shoes or whatever. They’ll probably benefit more from the financial side of things.”

Schmidt isn’t keeping the money he gets from the auction, he’s donating it to youth sports groups, a church, and other charities where he lives. And yes, he is keeping a couple of things for himself.

He is doing the auction through Steiner Sports, and you can view it here. It continues for another week. If you’ve got the money pick something up, at least it’s going to a good cause.

 

 

Cavaliers have three choices with Kyrie Irving. And no rush decide on one.

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There were a lot of questions around Kyrie Irving‘s unexpected decision to tell Cleveland he wanted to be traded.

The first was why? He reportedly wants out of LeBron James‘ massive shadow, to “be the man” with another team. It also strikes me as a preemptive move — LeBron could leave next summer and Irving wanted to be in control of his own destiny rather than deal with the “is LeBron leaving roller coaster” for a season.

Next was “why now?” This is harder to find a good explanation for. Back in June, Irving talked about staying with LeBron and finding ways to beat the Warriors, a month later he wants out. It has to be frustrating for the Cavaliers front office, if Irving had told them this back at the start of free agency Cleveland might have been able to land Paul George or Chris Paul.

Finally, the question settled on Cleveland and what will they do?

They have three legitimate options.

1. Do nothing and keep Irving. The Cavaliers do not have to trade him — Irving has two years left on his contract, and the Cavaliers have leverage. Cleveland could take notes from the Lakers after Kobe Bryant’s trade me demand circa 2007 — Los Angeles told him they were looking but not move him, and eventually smoothed things over (and won a couple more rings).

It may be a lot harder for the Cavaliers to do that. How deep is Irving’s dissatisfaction run? Can LeBron and Irving mend fences? Or is the discord in Cleveland too great right now to smooth things over? Usually winning can cure all ills, and the Cavaliers should win plenty again. Then again, star players in the NBA usually get their way so if Irving really wants out…

2. Trade Irving for players to help them chase a title next year. My guess is this is the direction the Cavaliers will go. Why? Because Dan Gilbert looks at his franchise valuation since LeBron’s return and wants to keep him, and if the Cavaliers can get another ring (or at least look like a more serious threat to the Warriors) he’s far more likely to stay.

Because Irving does not possess a no-trade clause, the Cavaliers are not forced to send him where he wants to go (unlike Carmelo Anthony). Irving wants to go to San Antonio, but the Spurs would want to send LaMarcus Aldridge back, a guy who is also older and starting to decline, can be exposed defensively, and it leads to questions about a second ball handler for the Cavaliers. A Carmelo Anthony trade with the Knicks creates the same questions — ‘Melo wants to be a Cavalier, but would he and a young player (Frank Ntilikina or Willy Hernangomez) going to make the Cavaliers better. Or even keep them in front of Boston.

That said, there may be deals with other teams not on Irving’s list that better fit the Cavaliers’ needs. What if Phoenix offers Eric Bledsoe, a young player (Marquese Chriss, Dragan Bender, T.J. Warren) plus a pick? Cleveland gets a good point guard (not as good as Irving overall, but a better defender), a young athletic player, and they can stay near at the top of the East. There will be options like this that come on the table.

3. Trade Irving for young players and picks to jump start a rebuild. This is also known as the “we believe LeBron leaves next summer so let’s just be proactive and get all we can” plan. It should include trading LeBron as well before the deadline and just going into full on rebuild mode.

If the Cavaliers managed this path well — a legitimate question after Dan Gilbert decided he didn’t need one of the league’s best GMs right before the start of free agency — they could stockpile players and picks. It might not be the full Boston stockpile post Garnett/Pierce trade, but it puts the Cavaliers on that road (then it would come down to drafting well and developing players). All of this would require shrewd moves now and patience down the line, but it’s a legitimate course of action.

A fourth option discussed by fans — trade LeBron and rebuild around Kyrie — is unlikely I’ve been told. Start here: LeBron’s importance to the bottom line of the Cavaliers’ franchise value makes him far more important to Dan Gilbert and the organization than Irving. Also, even with what the Cavs get back in trading LeBron it would not make them a contender with Irving as the alpha (he doesn’t defend that well, and he’s not the guy on that team that moves the ball). Plus, Irving may want out still and could leave in 2019 anyway.

Regardless of which option the Cavaliers choose, what matters is not to rush into a decision. If they decide to trade Irving, do not trade out of frustration or anger — it needs to be devoid of emotion. It has to be about getting the best possible return. This summer is obviously a huge turning point for the organization, and they need to make a smart decision.

You know, the kind David Griffin would have made.

John Wall agrees to four-year $170 million contract extension

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John Wall had a designated player super max contract sitting in front of him (figuratively) since July 1, but he wanted to wait and see what the Wizards would do this summer, and talk to his family about a decision that could lock him in Washington for six years.

He saw the Wizards spend — they matched a max offer sheet for Otto Porter. He also looked around the East and decided this is where he wanted to be. He agreed to the extension on Friday, a story broken by David Aldridge of TNT/NBA TV.

This is a four-year, $170 million extension that kicks in after the two-years, $37.1 million left on Wall’s current deal.

Wall has developed into one of the top five point guards in the NBA, averaging 23.1 points per game last season while making his first All-NBA team (the third team, which he thought was a let down). He is a strong defensive point guard and still arguably the fastest guy in the league with the ball in his hands. He and Bradley Beal have formed one of the more formidable backcourts in the NBA.

Wall is now getting paid like an elite point guard, and he is just entering his prime.