Sixers GM Hinkie talks about search for coach, reaching out to fans

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It’s not just Charles Barkley who is confused.

There are fans in Philadelphia who heard little out of the organization while 12 other NBA coaches were hired and wondered what was going on. They watched the team’s popular All-Star point guard get traded away to usher in another rebuilding effort. They know they’re in for a rough season.

To some there seemed to be a distance with new GM Sam Hinkie —particularly media members used to Doug Collins and who now had a tougher job. Certainly some fans and some media members didn’t like the choices and the secrecy. Hinkie talked about liking to keep his cards close to his vest in a Q&A with the Philadelphia Daily News.

I think our fans will find me to be plenty open when we get to know each other. Our coaching search took quite a while and that may have caused that. Every little edge you can get is important. There is some level of secrecy as teams try not to let on to what they’re doing. If we were to have had Nerlens Noel come in and work out before the draft, that would have caused a stir being that we had the 11th pick, and the kind of things that happened on draft night (trading Jrue Holiday to New Orleans for Noel) possibly couldn’t have been possible. So we chose not to let teams know who we are working out, and a lot of forward-thinking organizations do that with the comings and goings of potential players.

But man, that coaching search did drag out, right?

I would say things largely progressed as I would have anticipated. Finding the right guy was always the priority, and when we did in Brett Brown we moved forward. Our first interviews were in Las Vegas in mid-July when I went out there for the summer league, just after the Orlando Summer League. It was a solid week of interviews. Then there were a few more to follow and then some more. I was focused immensely on finding who was the best fit for what we were looking to do.

Hinkie talks about using analytics — we all tend to focus on that but in reality the situation is much more complex. Like in the book “Moneyball” (not the movie, which plays up the drama more), the goal of the team was to find value where other teams were not looking. To do that in the NBA means using traditional scouting, analytics and any other information you have. Hinkie talks about being a guy who wants to get as much info as he can before making a decision, and that’s a good thing.

Part of being a GM in today’s game is dealing with the media and communicating with the fans. Hinkie got hired and was thrust quickly into a draft and free agency (not to mention that coaching search) and so time for building the public relationship wasn’t there. He said he wants to be open… but not too open.

I can’t speak to what happened before I got here, but going forward I see coach Brown and I to be open about all the decisions we make – the trades and the acquisitions and how we see things unfolding and what parts we’re excited about. I don’t think we will ever be a team that talks about the very next thing we’re going to do. That is giving an advantage to the other 29 competing teams. We have to find the right balance there for the organization and keeping the fans informed.

Like every GM, it will ultimately come down to wins and losses. This in the end is a pretty bottom line business — if in three years you can see a foundation for the Sixers built around young players (like Noel and future draft picks) that can compete at the highest levels of the sport, pretty much all will be forgiven. But if the rebuilding plan falls apart for any number of reasons, fans will turn on Hinkie and so ultimately will ownership.

Hinkie knows all this. Win or lose, Hinkie wants to go about it his way. You can’t blame him for that.

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.

John Wall wears cape to postgame press conference (video)

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John Wall has been super, averaging 27 points and 11 assists while leading the Wizards to a 3-2 lead over the Hawks in the first-round.

Did you see Isaiah Thomas carry in Game 5? ‘No,’ says Fred Hoiberg, who walks off (video)

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Fred Hoiberg opened himself to clowning by complaining about Isaiah Thomas carrying.

So, the Bulls coach got clowned after the Celtics’ Game 5 win.

Jae Crowder leg-locks Robin Lopez (video)

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Late in the Celtics’ Game 5 win over the Bulls last night, Jae Crowder leg-locked Robin Lopez – the same dirty play that caused rancor for Matthew Dellavedova in the 2015 playoffs.

Lopez blocked Crowder’s shot, but the ball went to Al Horford, who attacked the basket. As Lopez tried to rotate to contest another shot, he couldn’t move. Crowder, who’d fallen to the floor, had him in a leg-lock. Lopez freed himself just in time to foul Horford.

Adding insult to avoided injury, Lopez got hit with a technical foul for complaining about the no-call.

I bet the league issues a technical foul on Crowder, too.