Caron Butler

Caron Butler says he’s willing to mentor Michael Beasley


It’s highly unlikely that Michael Beasley will still be a member of the Phoenix Suns by the time training camps open at the end of September. But if he is still on the roster, the team’s newest veteran would be happy to take a crack at steering him in the right direction.

Caron Butler came to the Suns as part of the deal that sent Jared Dudley to the Clippers in exchange for Eric Bledsoe, a rising young talent still on his rookie contract who has all kinds of potential.

Butler was needed not for his talent on this rebuilding Suns team, but for his contract number in order to make the three-way deal that also netted the Clips J.J. Redick work from a salary standpoint.

Butler knows the situation in Phoenix — he may play plenty, and the team will try to win with the talent in place. But more important to the Suns at this point is the development of younger talent for the future, and Butler is more than happy to help in that regard.

From Jeff Caplan of

“He’s a guy that had an unbelievable collegiate career, who came into the NBA as a top-two pick, so the talent is there, it hasn’t gone anywhere. It’s like clay, it just needs to be molded right. Somebody needs to be around him, talking to him and telling him the right things and building him up and keeping nothing but positive energy around him and moving him forward instead of pulling him back.”

Butler, a raging success story born out of an unsavory childhood, arrested numerous times before he turned 15, said if Beasley remains with the team, and if the 6-foot-10, 235-pounder is willing, he will stick by the kid’s side, mentor him, attempt to reach him. At this point, save him from himself.

“I would stay in his ear, I would definitely stay in his ear,” Butler said. “I would continue to motivate him and I would challenge him night-in and night-out, in practice, just whatever I can do to make him better I would do as a human being, and obviously as a basketball player because I think he has tremendous upside still. He’s just 24 years old.”

Butler has been in the league 11 years, and given his upbringing, he could definitely be of value where Beasley is concerned.

More likely, however, is that Butler won’t get that chance.

The Suns haven’t made a sound since Beasley’s most recent arrest, and aren’t likely to until they announce they’re waiving him at some point before September 1. That’s the deadline for the team to be able to use the stretch provision to minimize the hit from a payroll and potentially a salary cap standpoint, but given the team’s current financial situation, they could wait even longer and just absorb the hit over the next two seasons.

It’s a positive that Butler is willing to take on this role during his time with the Suns. It just isn’t very likely that Beasley will be around long enough for him to have to do so.

Gordon Hayward goes behind Jordan Clarkson’s back with dribble

Gordon Hayward, Nick Young
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Utah’s Gordon Hayward abused the Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson on this play.

First, Hayward reads and steals Clarkson’s poor feed into the post intended for Kobe Bryant, then going up the sideline he takes his dribble behind Clarkson’s back to keep going. It all ends in a Rudy Gobert dunk.

Three quick takeaways here:

1) Gordon Hayward is a lot better than many fans realize. He can lead this team.

2) It’s still all about the development with Clarkson, and that’s going to mean some hard lessons.

3) Hayward may have the best hair in the NBA, even if it’s going a bit Macklemore.

(Hat tip reddit)

Could Tristan Thompson’s holdout last months? Windhorst says yes.

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five

VIZZINI: “So, it is down to you. And it is down to me.”
MAN IN BLACK nods and comes nearer…
MAN IN BLACK: “Perhaps an arrangement can be reached.”
VIZZINI: “There will be no arrangement…”
MAN IN BLACK: “But if there can be no arrangement, then we are at an impasse.”

That farcical scene from The Princess Bride pretty much sums up where we are with the Tristan Thompson holdout with the Cleveland Cavaliers, minus the Iocane powder. (Although that scene was a battle of wits in the movie and this process seems to lack much wit.) The Cavaliers have put a five-year, $80 million offer on the table. Thompson wants a max deal (or at least a more than has been offered), but he also doesn’t want to play for the qualifying offer and didn’t sign it. LeBron James just wants the two sides just to get it done.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN thinks LeBron could be very disappointed.

Windhorst was on the Zach Lowe podcast at Grantland (which you should be listening to anyway) and had this to say about the Thompson holdout:

“I actually believe it will probably go months. This will go well into the regular season.”

Windhorst compared it to a similar situation back in 2007 with Anderson Varejao, which eventually only broke because the then Charlotte Bobcats signed Varejao to an offer sheet. Thompson is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavaliers can match any offer, but only Portland and Philadelphia have the cap space right now to offer him a max contract. Neither team has shown any interest in doing so.

And so we wait. And we may be waiting a while.