Jerry Stackhouse, Draymond Green

Stackhouse says LeBron “misinformed” about state of union

17 Comments

LeBron James is not going to be the next president of the NBA players union. While I think his intent to have a bigger voice in union matters is serious, the fact is the man has a lot of commitments as the biggest player in the NBA — on the court trying to lead the Heat to a third straight title, and off the court selling Nikes in China and Powerbeats to everyone. Plus, he’s getting married soon.

But he gained notice when he said he thinks the union is going “backwards” right now.

Jerry Stackhouse, one of the union’s executive committee members who helped lead both the ouster of executive director Billy Hunter and then made sure Derek Fisher didn’t stay on as president, believes LeBron James misses the point. Stackhouse was tactful in an interview with CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger, but he got his point across.

“He’s the best player in the game right now and we want the entire league to be involved,” Stackhouse said in a phone interview while in New York on union and other business. “But he needs to be informed in speaking on our union business….

Stackhouse, one of seven executive committee members elected at All-Star weekend in Houston this past February — when longtime executive director Billy Hunter was ousted — said James’ comments felt like a “kick in the stomach.”

“I don’t think he’s had any dialogue with anybody since the All-Star break, but it is what it is,” Stackhouse said. “To make that statement about where we are as a union right now, he was misinformed.”

While other stars have held the union presidency — from Bob Cousy back in the day to Patrick Ewing — it is different now with the number of off-the-court commitment the elite players have. Plus, there was a push to make sure the union didn’t just represent star players and had more common/role players in positions of power (your Derek Fishers). The only real name player on the NBA’s executive committee is Chris Paul (and he’s not expected to seek the presidency).

Next week the union is meeting to discuss the open presidency and executive director positions. LeBron has other obligations and will not be there. Most players, stars or not, will miss it. But at that meeting the union will have early discussions about changing the entire structure of player representation in the union (currently one guy is elected to represent each team, but that has it’s challenges with different levels of interest, plus guys get traded).

There are going to be some big changes coming to the union, all leading up to the 2017 showdown with the owners over the current Collective Bargaining Agreement. That’s when the next lockout is expected.

Kobe Bryant on how teams should see Warriors: “‘OK, lace ’em up. Let’s go.”

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - MAY 03:  Retired NBA Champion, CEO, Kobe Inc., Kobe Bryant speaks onstage during 2016 Milken Institute Global Conference at The Beverly Hilton on May 03, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.  (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)
1 Comment

For two decades, Kobe Bryant saw everyone and everything as an obstacle to overcome: The Pacers, Sixers, Nets, Magic, Celtics, Tim Duncan, Gregg Popovich, Smush Parker, a torn Achilles. It didn’t matter. Kobe’s work ethic and drive had him rising above it all.

His focus hasn’t changed now. Kobe was on the Jim Rome show, and the topic of the new-look Warriors with Kevin Durant came up, along with the “woe is me” attitude of some players (and plenty of owners and GMs).

“I would have thought less about myself if I looked at that move and said, ‘That’s unfair,'” he said. “If you’re a real competitor, you look at that and say, ‘OK, lace ’em up. Let’s go. I don’t care how many players you have over there; we’re still going to take you down.'”

Easier said than done to make that happen, but that attitude is the only one to have if you think you have a chance. You can be sure LeBron James is thinking that way and telling his Cavaliers teammates the same.

We’re going to miss Kobe.

 

Report: Dwyane Wade’s cousin killed as innocent bystander in gang shooting in Chicago

CHICAGO, IL - JULY 29:  General manager Gar Forman of the Chicago Bulls (L) listens as Dwyane Wade speaks during an introductory press conference at the Advocate Center on July 29, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Getty Images
9 Comments

This news is just sickening. In a world with just too much sickening news.

According to NBC 5 in Chicago (which spoke to police), Dwyane Wade‘s first cousin Nykea Aldridge was pushing a stroller down the street when she was shot and killed as an innocent in the crossfire of a gang shooting.

The 32-year-old woman, whom family identified as Nykea Aldridge, was apparently the unintended victim of a gang shooting, police said. She was walking around 3:30 p.m. in the 6300 block of South Calumet when two males approached another male and opened fire, police said.

Wade tweeted this.

Aldridge was on her way to a local school to register her kids (they had just moved) when the shooting took place. There has been a rash of gang and gun violence in Chicago in the past year, and Dwyane’s mother Jolinda Wade had just been on a panel on ESPN’s Undefeated talking about it.

Wade is coming to play for his hometown Chicago Bulls this season.

Our thoughts are with Nykea Aldridge’s family and friends.

Bill Walton blames himself for Clippers leaving San Diego

BOSTON, MA - APRIL 13:  Member of the Boston Celtics 1986 Championship team Bill Walton is honored at halftime of the game between the Boston Celtics and the Miami Heat at TD Garden on April 13, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Mike Lawrie/Getty Images)
Getty Images
4 Comments

Donald Sterling was the owner of the Clippers when they left San Diego to move to the Los Angeles Sports Arena in 1984. He’s a greedy man who lived in Los Angeles, he owned a bad Clipper team playing in a fast-aging building in San Diego, Sterling was bouncing checks to the point the NBA was ready to take the team away from him, and the selfish owner wanted the team closer to him in a situation where he could make as much money as possible. To suggest Sterling (especially in that era) made any move that was not financially related would be just wrong.

Still Bill Walton — a San Deigo native — blames himself for Clippers leaving San Diego.

He talked about it with the brilliant Arash Markazi of ESPN.

“When you fail in your hometown, that’s as bad as it gets, and I love my hometown,” said Walton, who grew up in La Mesa, 9 miles east of downtown San Diego. “I wish we had NBA basketball here, and we don’t because of me….

“It’s my greatest failure as a professional in my entire life,” Walton said. “I could not get the job done in my hometown. It is a stain and stigma on my soul that is indelible. I’ll never be able to wash that off, and I carry it with me forever.”

It was not on Walton. Not even close.

This was the Walton between the as-good-as-any-center-ever Walton that led the Trail Blazers to the title in 1977 and the Sixth Man of the Year Walton in Boston in 1985. The Clippers’ Walton was the one battling multiple foot surgeries that kept him out of most of multiple seasons in a row — something he could not control. And if you want to make judgements about how he was healthy before and after his time with the Clippers but seemed to get poor medical treatment on cheap Sterling’s team, go right ahead.

The move to LA was all about Donald Sterling. It was about his pocket book and what was convenient for him. There was a reason his team was at the bottom of the NBA for two decades (and that since he sold the team, while they have struggled to advance deep in the playoffs, they have been a more serious threat).

Bill Walton shouldn’t blame himself.

 

Jeremy Lin has cameo in Taiwanese music video. Because he can.

Leave a comment

You know Jay Chou as “Kato” from the Seth Rogen version of “The Green Hornet.” Well, you know him that way if you’re one of the people who suffered through that disappointing effort.

It turns out, Chou is basically the Justin Timberlake of Taiwan — actor, musician, good at everything he touches (except the Green Hornet, but that’s not on him). He’s huge.

And in his latest music video (above) he has Brooklyn’s Jeremy Lin as a co-star.

There is pop-a-shot, a lot of ice cream references, and of course dancing in outfits that you and I couldn’t pull off in public. Just go ahead and watch it. You know you want to.

Expect to see Chou courtside in Brooklyn this season. They could use it, the Nets need a few celebs in house.

(Hat tip to  of CBSSports.com, apparently an avid follower of the Taiwanese music scene, and The Score.)