Jack Cooley left NBA money on the table for lucrative offer in Turkey

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Jack Cooley looked to have a hard road ahead of him coming out of Notre Dame as an undrafted and undersized big man that didn’t seem to have much pro potential, according to the majority of NBA scouts. After a standout performance at the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament followed by solid showings with both the Houston Rockets and Memphis Grizzlies in the Summer Leagues, though, Cooley earned an honest look when NBA training camps start in the fall.

That opportunity apparently presented itself with quite a few teams offering him guaranteed money, but the 6-foot-9 post has instead decided to start his professional career overseas with Trabzonspor in the Turkish Basketball League.

Why would a player that seemed like he’d never get one legitimate NBA opportunity turn down training camp invites from ⅓ of the best league in the world — especially considering some teams offered more than the standard minimum $25,000 for Cooley to show up and try and make their regular season roster, according to Cooley’s agent, Adam Pensack of Pensack Sports?

“The NBA guarantees were more than $25,000, but the deal in Turkey is unusually lucrative, especially for a rookie,” Pensack told Pro Basketball Talk on Saturday night. “Turkey is also arguably the best league in Europe, especially for bigs, so the opportunity to play real minutes against top-flight competition was too good to pass up.”

Some of the bigs in Turkey’s top division last year that might be familiar to our American readers included Joey Dorsey, Chinemelu Elonu, Artsiom Parakhouski, Alade Aminu and J.P Prince — none of which, aside from possibly Dorsey, are knocking down NBA doors — but the league’s crop of bigs look like they’ve improved this year. According to Mark Porcaro, one of the most underrated basketball researchers around, bigs playing in Turkey this year already include Boston Celtics draft pick Colton Iverson, Drew Gordon, Nate Jawai, Damir Markota, Furkan Aldemir, Semih Erden, Milan Macvan and Chuck Davis.

That list makes it difficult to confirm  whether Turkey is indeed one of the best leagues in Europe when it comes to its crop of big men, but the above-listed players have been legitimate NBA prospects at some point in the basketball careers. Regardless, Pensack believing that Cooley’s opportunity to play good minutes against top-flight competition was too good to pass up certainly makes sense.

That opens up a different question, though, because — after working as a director of basketball operations in the NBA Development League last season — I can attest that the bigs who end up making their way through the D-League are quite talented as well. Knowing that, and realizing Cooley would be a focal piece of his D-League team after competing in an NBA training camp, why wouldn’t Pensack instead place his client in a league where it’d be easier for NBA teams to keep an eye on his him throughout the upcoming season?

Essentially, it came down to money. Cooley would’ve earned, at most, $25,500, insurance and a place to stay if he chose to play in the D-League this year. Considering he turned down more than that from the NBA to just attend a team’s training camp to instead play in Turkey, it makes sense that he’d once again look at the higher-paying option overseas.

“As for the D-League? If Jack didn’t make a roster out of camp, we certainly discussed the possibility,” Pensack said, “But from a business perspective, this move made the most sense. Most players just never have an option like this, especially in their first year.”

It’s hard to blame Cooley for passing up on the financial security a season overseas can provide, but it also speaks volumes when wondering how close the NBA truly is to achieving success with the D-League. If players such as Cooley — a guy on the cusp of the NBA with 10 teams offering training camp opportunities — are going overseas to cash in bigger paychecks, when will the Development League begin to make staying stateside worth a good player’s while? Regardless of that, though, taking the overseas opportunity makes sense when knowing that his handlers have high hopes for what Cooley can accomplish during his season abroad.

“Jack will take full advantage of the opportunity and will come back next year as a better player,” Pensack assured me. “He made one three in his entire college career but he can really shoot the ball — as he showed in summer league — so a full year of doing it in games against top-level competition will do wonders for him.”

If the ferocious rebounder and is able to add a reliable three-point shot to his repertoire, the NBA better watch out next season. For now, though, Cooley’s decided to take the  guaranteed money and run.

Rockets owner appears to leave seat, yell at refs during matchup with Thunder (VIDEO)

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The Houston Rockets are in control of their series against the Oklahoma City Thunder, and were up 3-1 heading into Tuesday night’s Game 5 in Texas.

That did not stop what appeared to be Rockets owner Leslie Alexander from complaining to NBA referees. During gameplay. While standing directly next to an official, some 20 feet from his courtside seat.

Via Twitter:

Congratulations are in order to Bill Kennedy, the official in question, for keeping his cool. Or perhaps he just was so surprised by some dude yelling in his ear from right next to him he didn’t know how to react.

Brandon Jennings no fan of the NBA’s new Awards Ceremony event

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Come June 26, Drake will be on stage in New York City, handing out the NBA’s awards — Most Valuable Player, Defensive Player of the Year, Coach of the Year, and so on. (We need to set an under/over on the number of players Drake hugs that night.)

The NFL does it. The NHL does it. And the NBA has decided to follow suit with a broadcast awards ceremony where everything — except the All-NBA Team — will be announced that night. It’s happening because the broadcast partners want it.

Brandon Jennings is not a fan. Here is what the Wizards’ point guard Tweeted:

Jennings took down a Tweet that said if he had won the award he would have wanted to get it with the organization and his teammates around him. (And no, he knows he’s not winning the award. If you were going to put that in the comments be more creative.)

There’s something to what Jennings is saying. The NBA award roll out was awkward at times in previous years, but it gave the fans a chance to celebrate the awards with their favorite player. Now, everyone will watch it unfold on television from a ballroom in NYC. That feels a little colder. Also, we will get to see the reaction of those who don’t win (particularly this season, where several players can make a strong case for MVP).

It will be interesting to see how this first year goes, and how the league tweaks it going forward. The more than two month gap between the end of the regular season and the awards could feel a bit awkward. But we’re not going to knock the idea until we’ve seen it in action.

Portland GM makes it official, Festus Ezeli will not be back with team next season

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This season the Portland Trail Blazers found their center of the future (and the present) in Jusuf Nurkic.

Which makes the next step fairly obvious: Portland will not pick up the option on Festus Ezeli for next season, GM Neil Olshay confirmed at the team exit meetings Tuesday.

Portland signed Ezeli on what they thought was a great contract (one-year, $7.4 million, with a team option for the second year) because he was coming off knee surgery last summer. However, Ezeli was never healthy, needed a second surgery, and never got on the court. After taking it slow over last summer he practiced with the team twice in mid-October, there was more swelling, so he pulled back.

This summer Ezeli will not draw any guaranteed money from teams, but some teams may take a look at him. Athletic bigs get a lot of chances in the NBA.

Gordon Hayward will play for Jazz in Game 5 without minutes restriction

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Gordon Hayward has averaged 20.5 points a game in these playoffs — and that includes a 40 point outburst in Game 3 — but what has been more impressive is he has done it efficiently, with a true shooting percentage of 61.1. While Joe Johnson and others have stepped up, Utah will need Hayward’s shot creation if they are going to win this series.

They will have it Tuesday night in Game 5.

After missing the second half of Game 4 due to food poisoning (he tried to play but was ineffective in the first half), he is back and ready to go this time around.

So is Rudy Gobert. The Jazz will be at full health, while the Clippers remain without Blake Griffin for the remainder of the playoffs.

Having those two back is a boost for the Jazz, they need to score more consistently against the Clippers, but the bigger key will be defensively trying to deal with Chris Paul on the pick-and-roll. He has been masterful this series, and the Jazz need to keep him in check to give their offense a chance.