Phoenix Suns v Dallas Mavericks

Delonte West doesn’t believe being bipolar was his issue


Delonte West was a pretty promising player at one point in his career, starting alongside LeBron James, averaging double-figures and sort of earning himself cult-favorite status among those that like to cheer for fun people that play basketball. His career went downhill in a hurry, however, as he went from being a full-time starter with the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2009 to being out of the NBA by the time the 2012-13 season rolled around.

Most people attributed West’s downfall to his being bipolar, but he told the Boston Globe’s Gary Washburn that it had more to do with just being self-loathing, saying he didn’t think being bipolar was his issue.

“That kind of been my issue was self-loathing, it never was (being) bipolar,” West said. “I wasn’t considered bipolar before my Desperado (carrying guns on a motorcycle) incident as people like to describe it. From them on, a failed marriage after two months, lost some contracts and endorsements, and the center of everybody’s jokes. And the best player in the world (LeBron James), allegedly (I) had sex with his mother. Growing up in the hood, that’s the worst thing you could say is something about somebody’s mother. That would get you punched in the face. That hits home.”

It’s easy to see how that amalgamation of problems could lead to trouble, but nobody expected it to lead a talented player like West out of the league just a few short years later. And, ultimately, it wasn’t just the problems mentioned above, either.

West’s erratic behavior over the past few years culminated with a few famous clashes with the Dallas Mavericks management during training camp last season and was eventually let go prior to the regular season.  Next came nearly signing with the Grizzlies, signing with the D-League and then eventually refusing to report to the D-League because he believed an NBA contract was on its way. It never was, however, and West eventually ended up playing eight games with the Mavericks-affiliated Texas Legends where he averaged 10.3 points and shot just 35.1 percent from the field.

Knowing about all of the previous problems and seeing that he was far from successful during last year’s abbreviated stint in the NBA Development League, it’s not hard to believe he’s still without an NBA option heading into next season … but it does make one wonder what might’ve been.

Watch Kobe Bryant’s entire retirement-announcement press conference (video)

Leave a comment

Kobe Bryant reflected, told stories and showed his emotions.

For nearly 25 minutes, the Lakers star talked about his pending retirement. It was pretty cool.

Report: Wizards signing Ryan Hollins

Blake Griffin, Ryan Hollins
1 Comment

Nene hurt his calf. Drew Gooden is banged up. Martell Webster is out for the season.

Those are three players the Wizards expected to play power forward this season.

So, Washington – which has lost four straight – will bring in another big man: Ryan Hollins.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

The Wizards have a full roster of 15 players. They don’t qualify for a hardship exemption, which a team gets if four players have missed three straight games and will continue to be out. Only Webster and Alan Anderson definitely fit that bill. Gooden, who has missed five straight, might. But it’s unclear both how many of those absences were due to injury and when he’ll return.

So, Washington will have to waive someone to sign Hollins now. It’ll probably be Webster, whose $5,845,250 2016-17 salary is just $2.5 million guaranteed. If he’s out for the year and the Wizards plan to drop him by the summer to clear cap space, why not just do it now?

Hollins is more center than power forward and doesn’t appear to fit well with Marcin Gortat. But at this point, Washington just needs big bodies. Hollins – a nine-year veteran who plays decent interior defense, lacks offensive skill and rebounds poorly for his 7-foot frame – is at least that.

Dwight Howard crushes Kristaps Porzingis with dunk (video)

1 Comment

Sometimes – as Kristaps Porzingis sees against Dwight Howard – it’s more flattering just to play James Harden-level defense.