Newly acquired Net's Pierce, Garnett and Terry hold up their new jerseys as they pose for a photo with principal owner Prokhorov after a news conference in Brooklyn

Brooklyn Nets tax bill could be $87 million for next season


The largely free market loving, Republican owners of the NBA teams pushed hard in the last Collective Bargaining Agreement for something that you would think goes against their nature — an increased and very stiff tax structure that sets up a more socialist system. (They would argue the system is needed for the growth of the overall sport.)

But the tax penalty only works if an owner is afraid to pay it.

Brooklyn Nets own Mikhail Prokhorov laughs at it. Or at least isn’t going to blink writing a very large check.

With the addition of Alan Anderson on a minimum deal, the Nets will have a payroll of $102,211,009 next season (figures via Hoopsworld). The NBA’s salary cap is set at $58.7 million for next season, the luxury tax line is $71.7 million (meaning the new escalating taxes start at that figures). Marc Stein of ESPN did the math from there for TrueHoop:

Adding Anderson on a minimum deal nudges those figures to $30,463,009 (dollars over the tax line) … and a mind-numbing $87,199,293 (in taxes due)

So the signing of a player due to make just under $1 million next season will cost Brooklyn more than $4 million in additional taxes under the league’s much more punitive tax laws that go into effect this season.

The tax the Nets will pay will be based on their salary figures on the last day of the regular season, so it is possible for the Nets to make moves to lower that number.

But it doesn’t look like Mikhail Prokhorov wants to — he wants to win at any cost. So he will write a big check at the end of the season. What kind of winning he will get for that remains to be seen, but I don’t think it’s the title he is looking for.

Report: Pistons monitoring Markieff Morris situation

Markieff Morris, Marcus Morris
Leave a comment

Markieff Morris made a lot of noise this summer about being unhappy in Phoenix and wanting out, after the Suns traded his twin brother Marcus to the Pistons as part of a salary dump. He openly demanded a trade, and said on the record several times that his long-term future is not with the team. He’s changed his tune since training camp started, once he realized he has no choice but to play for the Suns unless they decide to trade him. But according to the Detroit Free Press‘ Vincent Ellis, there is interest from the one team he would be guaranteed to want to play for:

Markieff’s unhappiness with the Suns started when they traded his brother, so he would obviously jump at the chance to reunite with Marcus. And they don’t have much in the way of power forward depth beyond the other Morris twin and Ersan Ilyasova, so it would be a good fit from a basketball standpoint. But with the brothers’ felony assault charges pending, reuniting them on the same roster might not be the best idea, and it also opens up the possibility of having to trade one of them in the future and the other one being unhappy. So far, the Suns have shown no inclination to trade Markieff, but if that changes, the Pistons are an interesting destination to keep an eye on.

Popovich to Aldridge: “Welcome to the Spurs. Go sit” out practice.

LaMarcus Aldridge
Leave a comment

Gregg Popovich’s habit of resting key players at times has become the norm around the league as more and more studies have shown it helps players perform at higher levels plus helps reduce injury risk. Still, Popovich is the poster child.

New Spur LaMarcus Aldridge wasn’t used to this but got introduced to it in a very Popovich way, reports Jeff McDonald at the Express-News.

LaMarcus Aldridge missed his first workout of training camp today with leg tightness. Or rather, the Spurs — being the Spurs — held him out for precautionary reasons.

“We sat him out,” coach Gregg Popovich said. “He didn’t want to do it. I said, ‘Welcome to the Spurs. Go sit.’”

He might as well have added “get used to this.” Aldridge is going to get some rest this season. Not as many as Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili, and Tony Parker, but he’s going to get some nights off.

Remember, Aldridge is a guy who played through a torn ligament in his thumb last season because he thought the Blazers could make noise in the playoffs (and they might have had Wesley Matthews not gotten hurt). He’s not a guy used to being told to sit and rest.

It’s his “Welcome to the Spurs” moment.