US Coach K Returns Basketball

Players at USA Basketball mini-camp trying to impress with minimal guidance from coaches


LAS VEGAS — The USA Basketball roster is not only at capacity, it’s overflowing with talented players who all want to represent their country on the world stage.

This week’s mini-camp in Las Vegas on the campus of UNLV is an opportunity for 28 additional players to make an impression on chairman Jerry Colangelo, head coach Mike Krzyzewski, and assistants Tom Thibodeau and Monty Williams before playing in their next NBA season.

But through the first two days of camp, they’ve been playing with little to no guidance or instruction from the coaches in attendance.

It’s by design, as Thibodeau explained on Tuesday.

“Right now we’re starting a new pool,” Thibodeau told “Yesterday we put a little structure in just so we could get to playing, and we wanted to have an opportunity to watch each team compete against each other. We feel that’s probably the best way to evaluate. So that’s where we are right now, but each day will be a little bit different. We’re putting parts of a new system in, giving them the opportunity to play with each other so they can learn each other, and it gives us a better understanding of who fits well together. And that’s what we’re trying to evaluate right now.”

In talking to some of the players, they had a sense of what was being valued on the court, even if it was mostly qualities of the intangible variety that could be seen without guys being given a structured environment to participate in.

“They’re just letting us go a lot right now,” Klay Thompson said, after putting on an impressive shooting display in scrimmages on Tuesday. “I haven’t been getting that much feedback, I’m just playing as hard as I can.”

And does he have an idea of what the coaches are looking for?

“Just how hard we play, how focused we are, and playing defense,” Thompson said. “Playing with energy, diving for loose balls — all the little stuff. They know we can all score and play, so it’s just the little stuff.”

Damian Lillard said essentially the same thing.

“They’re looking for us to play hard,” Lillard said. “For guys to have each other’s backs, to be team players and do what it takes to help your team win.”

And how about that lack of hands-on coaching?

“They’re pulling guys aside giving pointers, and when we huddle up they’re saying things to the team,” Lillard said. “But for the most part, they’re not turning us into robots. They’re letting us have a lot of freedom and seeing what we can do and what guys can bring to the table.”

It’s been all scrimmaging, all the time, with Krzyzewski, Colangelo, Thibodeau, and Williams sitting on the center court sidelines, taking the games in seemingly without any reaction to what’s transpiring in front of them, and in complete silence.

That might be tougher for some of the younger players to deal with, but considering that this event is geared toward evaluating who is capable of fitting into a team that will eventually be playing for the literal title of World Champions, it’s completely understandable.

“It’s how you function with the team,” Thibodeau said, when asked what he and the rest of the coaches have been communicating to the players. “You’re not really looking for individual play. We’re trying to give everyone a fair opportunity — you just evaluate each and every day, you try to prepare well. They have to learn a new system, they have to learn each other. The most important thing is how it all fits together.”

Gordon Hayward goes behind Jordan Clarkson’s back with dribble

Gordon Hayward, Nick Young
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Utah’s Gordon Hayward abused the Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson on this play.

First, Hayward reads and steals Clarkson’s poor feed into the post intended for Kobe Bryant, then going up the sideline he takes his dribble behind Clarkson’s back to keep going. It all ends in a Rudy Gobert dunk.

Three quick takeaways here:

1) Gordon Hayward is a lot better than many fans realize. He can lead this team.

2) It’s still all about the development with Clarkson, and that’s going to mean some hard lessons.

3) Hayward may have the best hair in the NBA, even if it’s going a bit Macklemore.

(Hat tip reddit)

Could Tristan Thompson’s holdout last months? Windhorst says yes.

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five
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VIZZINI: “So, it is down to you. And it is down to me.”
MAN IN BLACK nods and comes nearer…
MAN IN BLACK: “Perhaps an arrangement can be reached.”
VIZZINI: “There will be no arrangement…”
MAN IN BLACK: “But if there can be no arrangement, then we are at an impasse.”

That farcical scene from The Princess Bride pretty much sums up where we are with the Tristan Thompson holdout with the Cleveland Cavaliers, minus the Iocane powder. (Although that scene was a battle of wits in the movie and this process seems to lack much wit.) The Cavaliers have put a five-year, $80 million offer on the table. Thompson wants a max deal (or at least a more than has been offered), but he also doesn’t want to play for the qualifying offer and didn’t sign it. LeBron James just wants the two sides just to get it done.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN thinks LeBron could be very disappointed.

Windhorst was on the Zach Lowe podcast at Grantland (which you should be listening to anyway) and had this to say about the Thompson holdout:

“I actually believe it will probably go months. This will go well into the regular season.”

Windhorst compared it to a similar situation back in 2007 with Anderson Varejao, which eventually only broke because the then Charlotte Bobcats signed Varejao to an offer sheet. Thompson is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavaliers can match any offer, but only Portland and Philadelphia have the cap space right now to offer him a max contract. Neither team has shown any interest in doing so.

And so we wait. And we may be waiting a while.