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Jason Kidd to agree to plea deal for DWI, league suspension likely to follow


Last summer, after he had signed on to play for the Knicks in what turned out to be his final season as a player, Jason Kidd was arrested for driving while intoxicated (DWI) after he crashed his SUV into a tree. Fortunately, nobody was injured.

Now comes time to pay that bill and Kidd is going to own up to what he did — which likely means a suspension by the league will follow.

Kidd will enter his plea to the court Tuesday, reports the New York Daily News after speaking with Kidd’s attorney.

“He will say that the drinks he had that night rendered him intoxicated,” his attorney, Edward Burke Jr., was saying on Monday morning. “What Jason is going to do is stand up and own this.”

About time. Burke, who comes out of Sag Harbor, L.I., and has handled a lot of high-profile cases in his time on the South Fork of eastern Long Island, explained that as part of the plea arrangement with the office of the Suffolk County District Attorney, Kidd has agreed to make school appearances on Long Island in the fall, which will be taped and can be used later as public-service announcements if the DA’s office chooses to use them that way.

Good. Kidd should have a price to pay for getting a DWI.

The league will almost certainly suspend Kidd for the first couple regular season games after the plea is entered. The league has traditionally suspended players a couple of games for DWIs and that is not likely to be different here.

Which means it will probably be the Nets Game 3 when he makes his coaching debut. As Bondy notes, that is a small price to pay

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.