Miami Heat Victory Parade And Rally

You can keep talking about changes Miami should make, Ray Allen says team not listening


The Miami Heat won 27 games in a row during the regular season, finishing the year with 66 wins and the best record in the NBA. They were pushed to seven games twice, but they are now the back-to-back NBA Champions.

So it was a little stunning in the wake of the Heat win to hear so much talk about what the Heat need to change to keep winning. Granted, they showed cracks in the armor, and yes a lot of that is tied to the fact LeBron James can opt out next summer. But still this is the team firmly entrenched on the top of the NBA mountain and a lot of people focused right past that.

Not the guys in the locker room. They are not listening to all that talk, Ray Allen told ProBasketballTalk.

“That’s probably the single most thing we try stay away from is what people think we need to do, or whether this is that is happening during a game,” Allen said. “We won 27 games in a row this season and they always found a reason why we weren’t good enough, why we couldn’t do this. Then it became must see TV after a while where people tuned in, where some people were rooting for us to lose and other people rooting for us to continue to go because it’s a great story. A great sports story. Something that’s historic that people will talk about for a long time.

“But at the end of the day it was stories that we didn’t really need to follow because we were the ones that were creating the stories. That’s all we want, to give people a reason to talk about us because we won.”

The volume of that noise around the Heat is going to go up next season because LeBron James is going to be asked in every city about his plans for the following summer — and when he dodges the question reporters will ask his teammates about LeBron.

Allen said he thinks this team can keep those distractions at bay.

“I think it’s pretty easy,” Allen said. “It depends the guys that you’re dealing with. We have a mature group of guys, very veteran group of guys that are about family, their own family. Most guys on the team have multiple kids that they have to raise. Your focus is sometimes so much in their direction you don’t have time to do things, just play basketball and go home and take care of the kids.

“So when we come to the locker room we talk about the kids and joke about small little things that they do. We don’t worry about the other things that are inconsequential.”

And the Heat believe they can three-peat.

“I have no doubt,” Allen said. “Obviously the league changes and they adjust to what we do, so in some form or fashion we have to improve what we’re doing. Whether that’s individually, some of the things we do offensively or defensively, there’s something every year that always needs to change. You can’t stand pat when the rest of the league gets better.”

However, the Heat largely have stood pat. The only expected roster change is Juwan Howard being released and replaced by a guy who will likely play just about as much (which is to say almost never).

Allen is back to his day-to-day summer life as a father. His son has diabetes so both father and son are in Washington this week to lobby for the Special Diabetes Program – legislation focused on multi-year funding of Type 1 diabetes research.

Allen will testify before congress this week about the impact of the disease and the need for longer-term funding to find a cure. In this setting is one place his celebrity is an advantage — Allen and his wife have done a number of public service announcements with Walker, and they are personally involved in the cause.

“I just tell (the congressmen and women) a little bit about who we are as a family and who Walker is,” Allen said. “Basically giving a human side to the story — diabetes is not just a word or a disease, there are people who fight every day to keep their children alive. There are families all across America like that.

“I’m just a dad just trying to make sure his son gets the proper care that he deserves and hope that one day they find a cure. It just so happens that I do have a high profile job and I walk into a room of high profile people and let them know this what I deal with regardless of what I’m dealing with professionally.”

There will be a lot to deal with professionally next season, but Allen said he still trying to savor that title run because it was a hard mountain to climb.

“It was extremely satisfying,” Allen said of the second title. “Just a year removed I was thinking I could have been retired, even before last year, because, you know, I played a long time. At that point I had 16 years in and at some point you got to say when is enough enough? But I’ve taken such great care of my body, and taking care of my game and being on point. Having left Boston and being in Miami, there was so much uncertainty, you don’t know how it’s going to happen, to have won is just extremely satisfying.”

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.