Kendall Marshall

Kendall Marshall looking to prove he belongs during Summer League with Suns


PHOENIX — Kendall Marshall was selected by the Suns with the 13th overall pick in last summer’s draft, but a chance to take the reigns as the team’s starting point guard has been far from guaranteed due to a combination of his need to develop, along with the constant personnel additions the team has made to shore up that position.

The Suns went out and got Goran Dragic in free agency the same summer Marshall was drafted, and now, ahead of Marshall’s second season, the team used a late first round pick on a guard in Archie Goodwin, and traded for a dynamic one that will likely play starter’s minutes in the deal that sent Jared Dudley out of town and brought Eric Bledsoe to Phoenix.

While Marshall is excited by the additions in talent, he wants to make sure that he remains a part of his team’s future plans — something he made clear when asked after practice on Tuesday what he’s looking to get out of the Summer League experience.

“First of all winning, but my second goal is to kind of prove that I can be a contributor on this team,” Marshall said. “I’ve been in prove-it mode since I got here, I think. With them bringing in [Goran Dragic] last year, bringing [Eric Bledsoe] in this year — they’re two great guys, I’m very excited to play with them. But at the same time, I want to prove that I can play with them and be on the court with them.”

New head coach Jeff Hornacek is planning an uptempo attack for the Suns’ offense this season, and given that speed isn’t one of Marshall’s assets, it’s worth wondering where he might fit in. But Hornacek is on Marshall’s side at this early stage of things, and believes he’ll be able to use his second-year player in different ways that play to his strengths.

“I like what he does in pick-and-roll situations,” Hornacek said of Marshall. “He’s not maybe the type of guy that’s going to fly around the court and penetrate and put pressure on the defense that way, but he’s a great passer in that when he gets into drag actions and pick-and-rolls, he can hit those rollers and make those extra passes, and those guys can put the pressure on the defense.”

“It doesn’t matter who’s going to be here,” Hornacek said, referring to the upcoming addition of Bledsoe. “We can put guys at different positions. He’ll have his opportunities.”

As for Marshall, he doesn’t seem the slightest bit concerned about the rest of the players who will be vying for minutes at his position. He’s exhibiting a positive outlook, and is only thinking about ways he can improve in order to earn his team’s trust.

“At the end of the day, you can only control what you do,” Marshall said. “And all I can control is how hard I work, so that’s all I’m worried about.”

Report: Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer urged Danny Ferry to resign

Danny Ferry, Mike Budenholzer
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When Danny Ferry’s racism scandal came to light, Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer publicly supported his general manager. Budenholzer called the “African” remarks about Luol Deng “very much out of character” and said Ferry was trying to learn from his mistakes.

And while Budenholzer might not have done anything privately to contradict his public statements, his tone apparently differed with Ferry and then-owner Bruce Levenson last fall.

Kevin Arnovitz and Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

Budenholzer very much owed his job to Ferry. His former Spurs colleague had pleaded with Levenson that the Gregg Popovich assistant was the man for the position. Yet Budenholzer felt Ferry should resign, lest the Hawks be subsumed in disruption when training camp opened, and he made his wishes known in a heartfelt conversation with Ferry and Levenson at that time.

In some respect, Budenholzer was just doing his job as coaching – trying to maximize his teams chances of on-court success. Ferry didn’t resign. He took a leave of absence that lasted until he agreed to a buyout this summer. That was apparently enough to avoid a paralyzing distraction. The Hawks won 60 games and reached their first conference finals since moving to Atlanta.

Ferry’s departure also significantly benefitted Budenholzer personally. Budenholzer ran the Hawks’ front office during Ferry’s leave, and the new owners have installed him as the teams permanent president.

The only other four active coaches with personnel control experienced much more success before getting the dual president/coach title.

Gregg Popovich coached the Spurs to four championships and 11 playoff berths before they named him president in 2008. Doc Rivers won Coach of the Year with the Magic and then guided the Celtics to a title during his 14 seasons before the Clippers plucked him to run their franchise. Stan Van Gundy steered the Heat and Magic to the playoffs in all seven of his full seasons, including a trip to the 2009 NBA Finals with Orlando, before getting hired by the Pistons. Flip Saunders won more games than every other Timberwolves coach combined, is responsible for every playoff win in franchise history and made four trips to the conference finals (including thrice with the Pistons) over 16 total seasons before Minnesota gave him the huge role.

Budenholzer has been a head coach just two seasons, including a 38-44 debut year. He has done a good job, winning Coach of the Year last season, and he might make a good team president.

But he lacks the track record most coaches need to gain such status. Budenholzer, more than anything, was at the right place at the right time.

Report: Rockets will try to sign Alessandro Gentile next summer

Alessandro Gentile, Paulius Jankunas
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The Rockets tried signing Sergio Llull this summer, but he opted for a long-term extension with Real Madrid.

So, they’ll just turn to another player in their large chest of stashed draft picks – Alessandro Gentile.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Gentile, who was selected No. 53 in the 2014, is a 22-year-old wing for Armani Milano. He’s a good scorer, but he primarily works from mid-range – an area the Rockets eschew. He can get to the rim in Europe, but his subpar athleticism might hinder him in the NBA.

If Gentile comes stateside, he’ll face a steep learning curve. But he’s young enough and talented enough that he could develop into a rotation player.