dwight lakers playoffs

Rockets fined $150K for publicly commenting on Dwight Howard deal during league’s moratorium period


There’s a reason you haven’t seen a press conference with Dwight Howard holding up a Houston Rockets jersey, or similar events involving Josh Smith in Detroit or Eric Bledsoe in Phoenix.

Once free agency in the NBA officially begins after midnight on July 1, there is a moratorium period in place where teams may negotiate with each other and with available free agent players, but no contracts may be signed.

Since technically none of the deals made during this period are official until the ink on a contract has dried, team personnel are prohibited from publicly discussing anything that has been agreed upon during this time.

That’s the rule and the reasoning behind the substantial fine handed down to the Houston Rockets on Tuesday from the league office.

From Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

ESPN has learned Houston Rockets just fined $150,000 for unauthorized public comments on Dwight Howard while NBA’s annual moratorium ongoing

At least part of the offending remarks can be heard in this interview Rockets GM Daryl Morey did with CSNHouston shortly following Howard’s announcement.

While it may seem silly that teams aren’t supposed to discuss already-agreed-upon transactions, there’s likely a legitimate business reason for the policy. If something were to happen and Howard (or any other free agent) were to unexpectedly change their mind before signing with a new team, it could cause problems in the areas of ticket sales or advertising deals that were made under the assumption that a certain new player would be coming to town to improve the immediate future of a franchise.

In case you were wondering why a moratorium period is needed in the first place, it’s due to the league and the players’ association using this time to conduct an audit that assists in determining the salary cap figure, which affects the specific dollar amounts allowed on players’ contracts for the following season.

Most teams are wise enough not to engage in these types of conversations, especially publicly, because everyone that holds a high-ranking front office position is well aware of the rules — no matter how senseless they may seem.

The Rockets organization just got a little too carried away in all of the excitement surrounding Howard’s decision. But after committing in the neighborhood of $88 million to him over the next four years, another $150,000 probably won’t sting all that much.

Gordon Hayward goes behind Jordan Clarkson’s back with dribble

Gordon Hayward, Nick Young
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Utah’s Gordon Hayward abused the Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson on this play.

First, Hayward reads and steals Clarkson’s poor feed into the post intended for Kobe Bryant, then going up the sideline he takes his dribble behind Clarkson’s back to keep going. It all ends in a Rudy Gobert dunk.

Three quick takeaways here:

1) Gordon Hayward is a lot better than many fans realize. He can lead this team.

2) It’s still all about the development with Clarkson, and that’s going to mean some hard lessons.

3) Hayward may have the best hair in the NBA, even if it’s going a bit Macklemore.

(Hat tip reddit)

Could Tristan Thompson’s holdout last months? Windhorst says yes.

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five
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VIZZINI: “So, it is down to you. And it is down to me.”
MAN IN BLACK nods and comes nearer…
MAN IN BLACK: “Perhaps an arrangement can be reached.”
VIZZINI: “There will be no arrangement…”
MAN IN BLACK: “But if there can be no arrangement, then we are at an impasse.”

That farcical scene from The Princess Bride pretty much sums up where we are with the Tristan Thompson holdout with the Cleveland Cavaliers, minus the Iocane powder. (Although that scene was a battle of wits in the movie and this process seems to lack much wit.) The Cavaliers have put a five-year, $80 million offer on the table. Thompson wants a max deal (or at least a more than has been offered), but he also doesn’t want to play for the qualifying offer and didn’t sign it. LeBron James just wants the two sides just to get it done.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN thinks LeBron could be very disappointed.

Windhorst was on the Zach Lowe podcast at Grantland (which you should be listening to anyway) and had this to say about the Thompson holdout:

“I actually believe it will probably go months. This will go well into the regular season.”

Windhorst compared it to a similar situation back in 2007 with Anderson Varejao, which eventually only broke because the then Charlotte Bobcats signed Varejao to an offer sheet. Thompson is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavaliers can match any offer, but only Portland and Philadelphia have the cap space right now to offer him a max contract. Neither team has shown any interest in doing so.

And so we wait. And we may be waiting a while.