Game 6 was not Gregg Popovich’s best night


Gregg Popovich is the best coach in basketball right now. One of the best of all time. He has four rings and built a culture in San Antonio that has them in NBA Finals 14 years apart and with consistent 50+ win seasons in between.

But he is not perfect.

He made a couple decisions down the stretch of Game 6 that were head scratchers and now he will be coaching a Game 7 in part because of them.

One was sitting Tim Duncan on some plays late — Boris Diaw was in to provide size with mobility to switch pick-and-rolls on the perimeter. Duncan at his age plays back on those more and Popovich wants to press the shooters.

With the Spurs up 3 and: 19 seconds left Popovich made that trade and while Diaw chased LeBron to challenge a three nobody was in the paint to try and keep Chris Bosh off the offensive glass. Bosh grabbed the rebound, found Ray Allen who drained a three that sent the game to overtime.

It’s easy to say this in hindsight, but if you’re not going to foul there before the shot to give up two free throws but protect the lead — Popovich said after the game “we don’t” do that, and statistically it’s pretty much a toss up with letting them shoot — then you have to have some rebounders on the floor. Such as Duncan. Miami is smart and well coached — they will take their first shot with time on the clock to allow for a rebound and a second chance in case of a miss, which is what happened.

Duncan sat a couple late plays late, both times Bosh got key offensive rebounds. Manu Ginobili defended Popovich in his post-game press conference.

“It’s one of the many things I’ll be thinking (about),” Ginobili said postgame. “We got a great coaching staff, great coach. If he did those subs, I’m very sure he thought about it and had many great reasons to do it. He wanted size on the defensive end.”

The other question was with Ginobili himself — after a brilliant Game 5 Ginobili was a mess again in Game 6 — he had 8 turnovers (almost as many turnovers as points, 9) and was a -21. He was struggling. But Popovich stuck with him for nearly 35 minutes. Earlier in the series when Ginobili struggled Popovich limited his minutes, but not Tuesday night.

With 8.8 seconds left in overtime Ginobili was in and the Spurs were down 1 point — score and they can win the title. Miami missed, Kawhi Leonard grabbed the rebound and Ginobili pushed the ball up — Popovich didn’t call timeout to get Parker in there for one last offensive play, he let Ginobili try to go coast to coast. What you got were a couple no-calls — Ginobili traveled but then was fouled by Ray Allen, both the kinds of plays where refs swallow their whistles late. Parker, the Spurs offensive catalyst, watched from the bench as the Spurs missed a great shot at a ring.

Popovich is still the best coach in basketball. Without question. And it’s not his fault Tim Duncan went 0-for-5 in the fourth quarter and overtime or that Danny Green went cold or a host of other things. This loss certainly isn’t all on him.

But Tuesday night was not his best night.

Gordon Hayward goes behind Jordan Clarkson’s back with dribble

Gordon Hayward, Nick Young
1 Comment

Utah’s Gordon Hayward abused the Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson on this play.

First, Hayward reads and steals Clarkson’s poor feed into the post intended for Kobe Bryant, then going up the sideline he takes his dribble behind Clarkson’s back to keep going. It all ends in a Rudy Gobert dunk.

Three quick takeaways here:

1) Gordon Hayward is a lot better than many fans realize. He can lead this team.

2) It’s still all about the development with Clarkson, and that’s going to mean some hard lessons.

3) Hayward may have the best hair in the NBA, even if it’s going a bit Macklemore.

(Hat tip reddit)

Could Tristan Thompson’s holdout last months? Windhorst says yes.

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five

VIZZINI: “So, it is down to you. And it is down to me.”
MAN IN BLACK nods and comes nearer…
MAN IN BLACK: “Perhaps an arrangement can be reached.”
VIZZINI: “There will be no arrangement…”
MAN IN BLACK: “But if there can be no arrangement, then we are at an impasse.”

That farcical scene from The Princess Bride pretty much sums up where we are with the Tristan Thompson holdout with the Cleveland Cavaliers, minus the Iocane powder. (Although that scene was a battle of wits in the movie and this process seems to lack much wit.) The Cavaliers have put a five-year, $80 million offer on the table. Thompson wants a max deal (or at least a more than has been offered), but he also doesn’t want to play for the qualifying offer and didn’t sign it. LeBron James just wants the two sides just to get it done.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN thinks LeBron could be very disappointed.

Windhorst was on the Zach Lowe podcast at Grantland (which you should be listening to anyway) and had this to say about the Thompson holdout:

“I actually believe it will probably go months. This will go well into the regular season.”

Windhorst compared it to a similar situation back in 2007 with Anderson Varejao, which eventually only broke because the then Charlotte Bobcats signed Varejao to an offer sheet. Thompson is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavaliers can match any offer, but only Portland and Philadelphia have the cap space right now to offer him a max contract. Neither team has shown any interest in doing so.

And so we wait. And we may be waiting a while.