San Antonio Spurs v Miami Heat - Game 6

Breaking down the Heat’s Game 6 comeback over Spurs


MIAMI — For all intents and purposes, the game was over. Except that it wasn’t.

The Heat trailed Game 6 of the Finals by five with under 30 seconds to play, and fans in Miami began streaming for the exits. Arena staffers in yellow shirts lined the baselines and the court across from the team benches, holding a yellow rope that would be used to close off access to fans once the championship trophy presentation was underway for the Spurs.

But a furious Heat comeback, along with a collapse by the Spurs and some borderline coaching decisions canceled all that, and now we’re looking at a Game 7 on Thursday that will decide the championship once and for all.

Let’s take a look back at exactly how it happened over the final couple of minutes of regulation.

89-89, 1:27 — The three-pointer that Tony Parker hit over LeBron James — a step-back, high-arcing rainbow that caught nothing but the bottom of the net — that tied the game for his Spurs would have gone down as one of the all-time great shots had his team hung on for victory. Parker set it up beautifully with a hesitation dribble, and James wisely defended the drive, yet still managed to get out and contest.

91-89 Spurs, 0:58 — Parker continued to try to take over, first by stealing a pass in the lane from Mario Chalmers on the defensive end, then by using his wizardry to score inside. Parker drove, spun, and hit a shot from about 10 feet out that put his team up two, and sent the Miami faithful in the building into a state of stunned silence.

94-89 Spurs, 0:28 — LeBron James turned it over on consecutive Heat possessions, and Manu Ginobili made three of four free throws to give San Antonio the five-point lead. The second of these from James was particularly egregious, as he floated a high lob at the rim intended for Chris Bosh, except that Bosh didn’t bother to jump for it, and even if he had, it would have been an extremely difficult play to convert given the trajectory of the pass.

94-92 Spurs, 0:20 — This is when the Heat went into desperation mode, but the Spurs’ lineup choices ended up helping Miami’s chances. James launched a three that rimmed out, but with Tim Duncan on the bench in favor of Boris Diaw and the defense he could provide on LeBron (along with the fact that the plan late was to switch on all screens, which makes Duncan a liability), the Spurs were short on big bodies to secure the defensive rebounds that could have sealed the game. Dwyane Wade was able to get in there and keep the ball alive, and the sequence ended with James getting another crack at a three that he was able to get to go this time.

“It’s what we’ve done all year,” Duncan said afterward. “In a situation where we were going to switch a lot of things, and it’s just unfortunate the way it happened. We got a stop, and we got a bad bounce, and right out to Ray Allen for a three. Just situational. But there’s no questions there. It’s the plays we’ve been making all season long.”

“Me personally, I trust Pop,” Parker added. “Whatever decision he makes.”

95-95, 0:05 — After the Heat fouled to stop the clock, Kawhi Leonard converted only one of his two free throws, leaving the door open for Miami’s fantastic finish. James missed an open look at a three, but once again with the Spurs having a shortage of big men on the floor with Duncan on the bench, Chris Bosh was able to secure the rebound, and kick it to Ray Allen for the incredible game-tying shot.

James was open and screaming for the ball once he saw his teammate get the rebound, but he was obviously fine with the play’s end result.

“If it’s not me taking the shot, I have no problem with Ray taking that shot, man,” James said. “He’s got ice water in his veins. Ray can be 0‑for‑99 in a game and if he get an open look late in the game, it’s going down. That’s just the confidence he has in himself. It’s the preparation that he prepares for every game. It’s the confidence that we have in him. We’ve seen it before.”

Matt Barnes says he went to house because his son looked distressed

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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So far, the only substantive accounts of the Matt Barnes-Derek Fisher altercation have come from anonymous sources.

The Knicks coach has deflected questions.

But Barnes is giving his account, at least of the lead-up.

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

It’s completely understandable that Barnes would act to ensure his children’s welfare.

And let’s say everything he said is true. It still leaves important questions unanswered.

Did Barnes – as he reportedly texted a friend he did – beat up Fisher and spit on his estranged wife, Gloria Govan? If so, why did Barnes deem that necessary to protect kids?

Gregg Popovich resting himself for Spurs game at Sacramento

Gregg Popovich
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Gregg Popovich said he wouldn’t coach in July.

Apparently, he’s taking off part of October, too.

Marc J. Spears of Yahoo Sports:

It’s not that surprising to see Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Boris Diaw staying home. Veterans miss preseason games all the time just to rest. With the Spurs, it happens even in the regular season.

But it’s still a little strange to see the head coach sit out, even though Popovich also did it last year.

It makes sense, though. Who cares about this preseason game? If travelling less helps the 66-year-old Popovich stay fresh in the years ahead, that’s well worth it. Plus, it gets Messina a little extra experience. Some day, he might be the head coach.