San Antonio Spurs v Miami Heat - Game 6

Breaking down the Heat’s Game 6 comeback over Spurs


MIAMI — For all intents and purposes, the game was over. Except that it wasn’t.

The Heat trailed Game 6 of the Finals by five with under 30 seconds to play, and fans in Miami began streaming for the exits. Arena staffers in yellow shirts lined the baselines and the court across from the team benches, holding a yellow rope that would be used to close off access to fans once the championship trophy presentation was underway for the Spurs.

But a furious Heat comeback, along with a collapse by the Spurs and some borderline coaching decisions canceled all that, and now we’re looking at a Game 7 on Thursday that will decide the championship once and for all.

Let’s take a look back at exactly how it happened over the final couple of minutes of regulation.

89-89, 1:27 — The three-pointer that Tony Parker hit over LeBron James — a step-back, high-arcing rainbow that caught nothing but the bottom of the net — that tied the game for his Spurs would have gone down as one of the all-time great shots had his team hung on for victory. Parker set it up beautifully with a hesitation dribble, and James wisely defended the drive, yet still managed to get out and contest.

91-89 Spurs, 0:58 — Parker continued to try to take over, first by stealing a pass in the lane from Mario Chalmers on the defensive end, then by using his wizardry to score inside. Parker drove, spun, and hit a shot from about 10 feet out that put his team up two, and sent the Miami faithful in the building into a state of stunned silence.

94-89 Spurs, 0:28 — LeBron James turned it over on consecutive Heat possessions, and Manu Ginobili made three of four free throws to give San Antonio the five-point lead. The second of these from James was particularly egregious, as he floated a high lob at the rim intended for Chris Bosh, except that Bosh didn’t bother to jump for it, and even if he had, it would have been an extremely difficult play to convert given the trajectory of the pass.

94-92 Spurs, 0:20 — This is when the Heat went into desperation mode, but the Spurs’ lineup choices ended up helping Miami’s chances. James launched a three that rimmed out, but with Tim Duncan on the bench in favor of Boris Diaw and the defense he could provide on LeBron (along with the fact that the plan late was to switch on all screens, which makes Duncan a liability), the Spurs were short on big bodies to secure the defensive rebounds that could have sealed the game. Dwyane Wade was able to get in there and keep the ball alive, and the sequence ended with James getting another crack at a three that he was able to get to go this time.

“It’s what we’ve done all year,” Duncan said afterward. “In a situation where we were going to switch a lot of things, and it’s just unfortunate the way it happened. We got a stop, and we got a bad bounce, and right out to Ray Allen for a three. Just situational. But there’s no questions there. It’s the plays we’ve been making all season long.”

“Me personally, I trust Pop,” Parker added. “Whatever decision he makes.”

95-95, 0:05 — After the Heat fouled to stop the clock, Kawhi Leonard converted only one of his two free throws, leaving the door open for Miami’s fantastic finish. James missed an open look at a three, but once again with the Spurs having a shortage of big men on the floor with Duncan on the bench, Chris Bosh was able to secure the rebound, and kick it to Ray Allen for the incredible game-tying shot.

James was open and screaming for the ball once he saw his teammate get the rebound, but he was obviously fine with the play’s end result.

“If it’s not me taking the shot, I have no problem with Ray taking that shot, man,” James said. “He’s got ice water in his veins. Ray can be 0‑for‑99 in a game and if he get an open look late in the game, it’s going down. That’s just the confidence he has in himself. It’s the preparation that he prepares for every game. It’s the confidence that we have in him. We’ve seen it before.”

Kevin Love names NBA players he thinks could play in NFL

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The majority of guys in the NBA are not built for the NFL. Blake Griffin the tight end makes a huge target for a free safety to line up. Kevin Durant is a little thin. Carmelo Anthony? Come on now.

But there are a few guys who might be able to, and on his show Dan Patrick asks Kevin Love about it today (see the video above). Then DP tries to take the obvious call of LeBron James off the table.

Nate Robinson as a DB? He’s athletic enough but at his height he would be a target for tall receivers. I like Dan Patrick’s suggestion of Russell Westbrook the free safety — he is certainly athletic enough.

Love also picked himself as a QB. Um, no. I’m not sure his outlet passing skills translate.

Hawks’ Thabo Sefolosha on not guilty verdict: “Justice was served”

Thabo Sefolosha
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Friday morning, a New York jury found Atlanta Hawks guard Thabo Sefolosha not guilty of misdemeanor obstructing government administration, disorderly conduct, and resisting arrest. The charges stemmed from the night in the final weeks of last season when Sefolosha and then teammate Pero Antic went to a New York club after arriving in town, and while there Pacers’ player Chris Copeland was stabbed outside the club. In his clash with police, Sefolosha suffered a broken leg that required surgery and kept him out of the playoffs.

The New York prosecutor tried to make this go away with a plea deal of just day of community service and six months probation. But Sefolosha had the means and mind to fight the charges, got his day in court and won. This is what he said in a statement after the verdict, released by the Atlanta Hawks.

“This morning’s verdict ended a long and emotional period for me.  Justice was served and for that I am eternally grateful to the judge and jury for their quick and deliberate decision….

“It’s troubling to me that with so much evidence in my support that this case would even be brought to trial and that I had to defend myself so hard to get justice. It pains me to think about all of the innocent people who aren’t fortunate enough to have the resources, visibility and access to quality legal counsel that I have had.

“It was important to me as a man, a father to two young girls and as a role model, to stand up for what I believe in and have my name cleared of any wrongdoing.  Today’s verdict will not make up for the pain and trauma my family and I have suffered over the past six months or bring back the opportunity to have played in the Eastern Conference Finals and have a shot at an NBA title, but it does bring me some peace and closes a painful chapter in my life.

“Now I look forward to returning to the team and focusing solely on my rehabilitation for the upcoming season so that I can get back to playing the game I cherish so much.”

While Sefolosha says he is focusing “solely” on his rehab, the win in the criminal case would bode well for a potential civil case if he wanted to sue regarding his treatment and the broken leg.

Hawks’ coach Mike Budenholzer — who testified at the trial and was amused by parts of it — released this statement:

“Thabo is a man of great character and we are proud that he took a principled approach to proving his innocence. We are extremely happy for him and his family, and we are very pleased with today’s verdict in his favor.”