Miami Heat v San Antonio Spurs - Game 5

Danny Green takes NBA Finals 3-point record, NBA Finals MVP award next?

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Danny Green rose for his 33rd 3-point attempt of the 2013 NBA Finals, and for the 23rd time, the ball splashed through the net.

On cue, the Heat called timeout, creating a scene similar baseball’s game stoppages to honor broken records.

Green – who broke the record for 3-pointers in an NBA Finals and would push the the mark to 25 (on 38 attempts) by the end of the Spurs’ 114-104 Game 5 victory – clapped his hands and screamed, and then he headed to the bench for pats on the back from teammates and coaches.

Ray Allen, who saw his record of 22 3-pointers in the 2008 Finals broken, sat on the Miami bench and made no attempts to hide the disgust pouring over his face.

Green had never made this many 3-pointers in a five-game stretch, though he’d played just 106 games entering the Finals, because he was too busy getting cut by the Cavaliers, Spurs and Spurs again. Yet, this passionate mid-game celebration was all about him.

This is the awesomeness of Danny Green, the hottest player on the biggest stage.

But what happened in the moments preceding his record-breaking trey show the full story of Danny Green, the reason we can witness his awesomeness.

Dwyane Wade pushed the ball upcourt, and Green caught him from behind. With Green hounding Wade, Manu Ginobili poked the ball loose, getting credit for the steal when Green dove to the floor to corral the ball. Green passed from his back to Ginobli, and the Spurs surged the other direction.

Green momentarily stumbled over Wade as he tried to get up, but Green still reached his feet first. Again, Green raced down the floor quicker and was wide open as the trailer, Wade still languishing in the distance, on the record-breaking triple.

That is why Green, whom Gregg Popovich cut for a failure to bring consistent effort, is playing for the Spurs. It’s also why Green is in the driver’s seat to become the most unlikely NBA Finals MVP ever.

Green found a team that embraces his biggest strength, 3-point shooting. Not long ago, progressive teams tolerated 3-point shots. Popovich seeks 3-pointers and their and the 50 percent more points they produce than other makes.

But Popovich also wouldn’t tolerate Green’s effort lapses, and Green didn’t even get even a guaranteed roster spot until he solved those issues. With the help of his former North Carolina coach, Roy Williams, Green did that.

Now, Green leads the Spurs, who hold a 3-2 series advantage, in scoring by nine points. Because the Spurs’ traditionally recognized stars – Tim Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili – have been up and down, there’s no clear-cut choice for Finals MVP if San Antonio hangs on. But 28 of the last 30 Finals MVPs led the winning team in scoring,* so Green is certainly on track to get consideration from the voters who prefer simple measures.

*Chauncey Billups (2004) and Larry Bird (1986) being the exceptions.

The voters who take a deeper examination will see Green’s hustle plays and helpful defense on LeBron James, which might be enough of a complement to Green’s 3-point shooting and earn him the award if Duncan, Parker or Ginobili doesn’t overtake him the rest of the series.

Of course, the Heat can still win, or perhaps, voters could reward the player who’s had the best series so far – LeBron – even though a player on the losing team hasn’t wont Finals MVP since Jerry West took the inaugural award in 1969.

At minimum, Green is planted firmly in the conversation. If the Finals ended today, he would get my hypothetical vote ahead of any Spur (though I would vote for LeBron).

Only great teams reach the NBA Finals, and greats teams are usually led by great players. Finals MVPs are typically the best of the best, perhaps creating an even better list of the game’s best than regular-season MVPs. All but three* of 45 Finals MVP awards have gone to Hall of Famers (Michael Jordan, Hakeem Olajuwon, Isiah Thomas, Joe Dumars, James Worthy, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Moses Malone, Dennis Johnson, Wes Unseld, Bill Walton, Jo Jo White, Rick Barry, John Havlicek, Willis Reed, Wilt Chamberlain and Jerry West) or sure-fire future Hall of Famers (LeBron James, Dirk Nowitzki, Kobe Bryant, Paul Pierce, Tony Parker, Dwyane Wade, Tim Duncan and Shaquille O’Neal).

*Chauncey Billups, Cedric Maxwell and Jo Jo White being the exceptions.

Green is not a Hall of Famer or a sure-fire future Hall of Famer, but he’s also not just the novelty who made 5-of-5 3-pointers in Game 2. He airballed a 3-pointer early in Game 5, shook it off and finished 6-for-10 from beyond the arc, still lowering his Finals 3-point percentage.

He’s playing with supreme confidence and forcing the basketball world to take notice.

Undoubtedly, part of Green’s stirring Finals is a run of good fortune, a hot streak coming at the most opportune time. Green could turn into a pumpkin at any moment.

But even if that happens and his 3-point shooting goes cold, you can still count on Green beating the Heat for loose balls and beating them downcourt.

Green’s 3-point shooting is why you’re noticing him, but his hustle is why he’s here.

Both explain why he’s suddenly the front-runner for Finals MVP.

Watch Wizards’ Otto Porter drain halfcourt shot

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 26:  Otto Porter Jr. #22 of the Washington Wizards  poses for a photo during media day  at Verizon Center on September 26, 2016 in Washington, DC.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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The Washington Wizards were having a little fun, a half-court shooting contest near the end of practice on Friday.

Apparently, half court is well within Otto Porter‘s range.

https://platform.vine.co/static/scripts/embed.js

Porter’s going to be starting at the three, working next to John Wall and Bradley Beal, and they could use another shooter to help balance the floor this season. Porter hit 36.7 percent from three last year, he’s got some range. Although he really shouldn’t try this shot mid-game, Brooks wouldn’t even let Kevin Durant do that.

Bryan Colangelo: 76ers had losing culture

Dwayne Casey
AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Frank Gunn
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Sam Hinkie’s Process made sense on paper. Get young, lose, draft high, repeat until the 76ers stockpiled enough talent to surge forward with a clean cap sheet.

But the Process didn’t unfold on paper, and there was always a catch. What damage would years of losing do to the organization and the real people within it?

We know some of the fallout. The Process embarrassed ownership, leading to Hinkie’s ouster. It also – according to Hinkie’s replacement, Bryan Colangelo, – created a toxic environment.

Colangelo, via The Vertical Podcast with Woj:

Really, factually, there was a losing culture. There was a losing mindset.

It had been ingrained partly because of the undertaking of rebuilding that they had been going through. And it’s a byproduct of the rebuilding process, if you will. You’re going to lose some games along the way, and it becomes part of the fabric of the team and the organization.

And I think more than anything the mindset needed to shift. The mindset needed to change. And that’s why we’ve been talking about winning and doing everything to promote winning, promote a culture of excellence, to promote better thought process in everything.

Keep in mind, the worse the 76ers are perceived at the time Colangelo took over, the better he’ll look.

But there was real evidence of a bad culture – from Jahlil Okafor‘s fighting to Joel Embiid‘s coachability to Nerlens Noel‘s tardiness. Players knew maximum focus and effort wouldn’t result in winning anyway, so that made it easier for bad habits to develop. Those bad habits can be contagious. Try as he might, coach Brett Brown couldn’t stem the tide.

Colangelo is trying to go a different way, bringing in veterans like Elton Brand, Gerald Henderson and Jerryd Bayless. Philadelphia won’t have as many roster spots for young players with upside, and those vets occupy cap space. But, right or wrong, Colangelo identified a problem and is trying to fix it.

Report: Ben Simmons suffered acute foot injury, will need surgery

TARRYTOWN, NEW YORK - AUGUST 07:  Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76ers poses for a portrait during the 2016 NBA Rookie Photoshoot at Madison Square Garden Training Center on August 7, 2016 in Tarrytown, New York. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2016 NBAE  (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
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Within hours of the Sixers’ No. 1 pick Ben Simmons going down with a foot injury that might derail his rookie season, the rumors about it being weight related started. Simmons needed to add weight coming it of LSU and had reportedly put on more than 30 pounds since the draft. Was that too much too quickly? Both players and major trainers have said yes.

The Sixers have moved to shoot this down, saying this was an acute fracture — something that happened suddenly, from stepping on a teammate’s foot Friday during a scrimage — and was not stress related, as would happen with weight issues.

More importantly, the severity of the break means surgery, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.

Surgery will mean Simmons likely will miss a majority — if not all — of the coming season, and you can be sure the Sixers will be cautious bringing him back (we saw that with Joel Embiid).

This is just deflating to a Sixers franchise that has had terrible luck with injuries the past couple of years. And yes, some people around the league quietly will say this is karma for all the tanking.

Celtics’ Terry Rozier says he wants all of Evan Turner’s minutes

Boston Celtics guard Terry Rozier shoots during NBA basketball training camp, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Waltham, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
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There is a pecking order in the Celtics backcourt: Isaiah Thomas is the scoring/playmaking point guard, with Avery Bradley and Marcus Smart playing the more defensive backcourt teammate role next to him at different times.

Still, there are minutes to be had — Evan Turner is no longer in camp and the secondary playmaker. He is on another coast trying to become the other playmaker Portland needs.

Second-year player Terry Rozier wants those minutes.

Good. Celtics fans should like that their young player is saying this.

More importantly, reports out of Celtics training camp say Rozier is playing very well, using his speed to create shots for himself and others. It’s been a great change of pace for the Celtics, one Brad Stevens could put to use this season.

Rozier is going to be coming off the bench, but if he can do that and bring this energy and shot creation, he’s going to get plenty of run this season. And be another part of a strong young core in Boston that just keeps getting better.