Spurs’ Green, Neal, Leonard have same amount of points as LeBron, Wade, Bosh through 3 games of the Finals


SAN ANTONIO — The Spurs and their “Big Three” have taken it to the Heat so far in this series, and it’s one of the reasons that Miami finds itself down two games to one in the NBA Finals.

But it isn’t Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, and Manu Ginobili who are keeping pace with LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh through the first three games — it’s been the more unsung, role players who have risen up to perform on the game’s greatest stage, as pointed out by Tom Haberstroh of ESPN.com.

Danny Green, Gary Neal, and Kawhi Leonard have combined to score 130 points in the Finals thus far, and it’s the exact same amount tallied by James, Wade and Bosh.

Small sample size theater and all that, sure. And of course, the numbers get skewed even further with a game like Green and Neal combined for on Tuesday, scoring 51 of those 130 points in a single night while contributing to an historic shooting performance from three-point distance.

Miami will have to find away to defend the arc better as the series moves forward, but the bigger problem has been what the Heat haven’t been getting from their All-Star core, especially on Tuesday, and especially from James.

LeBron said afterward he just has to play better, and that’s going to mean taking the shots he wants instead of those that the Spurs are choosing to allow. James shot just 7-of-21 from the field in Game 2, but the location of those attempts is what needs to change for the Heat to start to find a consistent measure of success.

James was 5-of-7 in Game 2 from inside the restricted area, but made just one of his five attempts from beyond the three-point arc, and was even worse from midrange, where he was able to connect only one of nine times. Smart teams emphasize creating shots in the paint or in the corners for open looks at a short three, and by LeBron settling for the open midrange looks instead of forcing the issue to create something better, the Spurs are getting exactly what they want out of the league’s MVP.

It wasn’t only LeBron, however — his teammates seemed to be fine with settling for these shots in Game 2, as well. Miami was only 7-of-33 from outside the restricted area and inside the three-point arc, and that accounted for 43 percent of their shots.

None of that can continue if the Heat are to bounce back and eventually get control of this series, and you have to think that at some point the role players for San Antonio will cool off, and the Spurs will need to turn to their stars to get the required level of production.

But it doesn’t have to go on very much longer — it’s worked through three games, and the Spurs just need it to continue for two more in order to end up winning the title.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
1 Comment

Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.