Heat's James dunks on Spurs' Green during Game 2 of the NBA Finals in Miami

More aggressive Heat go on 33-5 run to blow out Spurs in Game 2, even series


MIAMI — For nearly three quarters the San Antonio Spurs seemed to be doing it again — they held LeBron James to 2-of-12 shooting, they were getting back in transition and taking away the easy baskets the Heat thrive on, plus Danny Green was nailing threes like they were lay-ups. It was a close game about execution and those are the kind the Spurs usually win.

Then Miami did to the Spurs what they do to everyone — they find that extra gear and go on a run nobody can match. This time it was a 33-5 run that started late in the third quarter and made this a blowout by the middle of the fourth.

Miami’s defensive pressure forced more turnovers, those became transition opportunities, LeBron went 5-of-5, the Heat got help from guys like Mario Chalmers (19 points on the night to lead Miami) and Ray Allen (13).

The more aggressive Heat blew the game open and cruised to a 103-84 win. That evens the NBA Finals at 1-1 with Game 3 in San Antonio on Tuesday.

“You know what, credit to Miami, honestly” Tim Duncan said. “First start there. They outplayed us. They ended quarters better than us. We turned the ball over more than we should have. Credit to them, first of all.

“We didn’t play well. We didn’t shoot well.”

No, they didn’t. Duncan, Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker combined to shoot 10-of-33 on the night. Part of that was the Heat’s pressure but Duncan said he got the shots he wanted, the other two got some clean looks too, but they just could not knock them down. The Heat did a great job of taking away the middle, forcing the Spurs to run their offense from the wings.

During the Heat run the Spurs shot 2-of-10 with six turnovers.

“In the second half, they just ran us over,” Ginobili said. “We didn’t move the ball at all. Their pressure really got us on our heels. And offensively, they just ran, they penetrated, they kicked it, they did everything they wanted.”

Green was the one Spur knocking down shots — he was 5-of-5 from three on his way to 17 points. Those five threes in an NBA Finals game tie the Spurs franchise record, one held by big game hunter Robert Horry. But Green didn’t get those looks during the Heat run.

San Antonio once again did a good job building a wall in front of LeBron James. His numbers — 17 points on 7-of-17 shooting, 8 rebounds, 7 assists — were down from last game, and he took a little heat then for not doing enough, not being aggressive enough.

He said after that first game it wasn’t about him, it was about his teammates making plays when the defense is focused on him like that. Miami did that in Game 2 — Chris Bosh has 12 points, Dwyane Wade 10, and there was another big game on the big stage from Mario Chalmers on a big stage.

“We have a lot of those guys,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “You can’t teach that quality, the big game guts. They feel the most alive in these situations when you typically feel the most pressure. Drives me crazy sometimes in December and January. But when you get to this time of year you like it.”

This kind of game is what makes Miami so tough in a seven-game series. The Spurs got what they wanted Game 1, they played the Heat close and make enough plays at the end, and you start to think you can grind out four wins in seven games. But it’s not really seven games because at least once and usually twice a series they have a stretch like this — they find that extra gear and blow you out. Then you need to grind out wins in four of five games, and nobody has been able to do this.

So they head to San Antonio tied 1-1. Since the NBA went to the 2-3-2 Finals format there have been 12 series tied after the first two and the home team is just 3-of-9 in those Game 3s. Including last year when the Heat beat the Thunder.

San Antonio got a split on the road in the first two games, Ginobili said if you had offered him that before the start of the series he would have taken it. But that’s not going to be enough on Game 3.

“We have three at home, so we’re excited about that. But if we play like we did tonight, that’s not going to matter,” Duncan said.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

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Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.