Heat's James dunks on Spurs' Green during Game 2 of the NBA Finals in Miami

More aggressive Heat go on 33-5 run to blow out Spurs in Game 2, even series

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MIAMI — For nearly three quarters the San Antonio Spurs seemed to be doing it again — they held LeBron James to 2-of-12 shooting, they were getting back in transition and taking away the easy baskets the Heat thrive on, plus Danny Green was nailing threes like they were lay-ups. It was a close game about execution and those are the kind the Spurs usually win.

Then Miami did to the Spurs what they do to everyone — they find that extra gear and go on a run nobody can match. This time it was a 33-5 run that started late in the third quarter and made this a blowout by the middle of the fourth.

Miami’s defensive pressure forced more turnovers, those became transition opportunities, LeBron went 5-of-5, the Heat got help from guys like Mario Chalmers (19 points on the night to lead Miami) and Ray Allen (13).

The more aggressive Heat blew the game open and cruised to a 103-84 win. That evens the NBA Finals at 1-1 with Game 3 in San Antonio on Tuesday.

“You know what, credit to Miami, honestly” Tim Duncan said. “First start there. They outplayed us. They ended quarters better than us. We turned the ball over more than we should have. Credit to them, first of all.

“We didn’t play well. We didn’t shoot well.”

No, they didn’t. Duncan, Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker combined to shoot 10-of-33 on the night. Part of that was the Heat’s pressure but Duncan said he got the shots he wanted, the other two got some clean looks too, but they just could not knock them down. The Heat did a great job of taking away the middle, forcing the Spurs to run their offense from the wings.

During the Heat run the Spurs shot 2-of-10 with six turnovers.

“In the second half, they just ran us over,” Ginobili said. “We didn’t move the ball at all. Their pressure really got us on our heels. And offensively, they just ran, they penetrated, they kicked it, they did everything they wanted.”

Green was the one Spur knocking down shots — he was 5-of-5 from three on his way to 17 points. Those five threes in an NBA Finals game tie the Spurs franchise record, one held by big game hunter Robert Horry. But Green didn’t get those looks during the Heat run.

San Antonio once again did a good job building a wall in front of LeBron James. His numbers — 17 points on 7-of-17 shooting, 8 rebounds, 7 assists — were down from last game, and he took a little heat then for not doing enough, not being aggressive enough.

He said after that first game it wasn’t about him, it was about his teammates making plays when the defense is focused on him like that. Miami did that in Game 2 — Chris Bosh has 12 points, Dwyane Wade 10, and there was another big game on the big stage from Mario Chalmers on a big stage.

“We have a lot of those guys,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “You can’t teach that quality, the big game guts. They feel the most alive in these situations when you typically feel the most pressure. Drives me crazy sometimes in December and January. But when you get to this time of year you like it.”

This kind of game is what makes Miami so tough in a seven-game series. The Spurs got what they wanted Game 1, they played the Heat close and make enough plays at the end, and you start to think you can grind out four wins in seven games. But it’s not really seven games because at least once and usually twice a series they have a stretch like this — they find that extra gear and blow you out. Then you need to grind out wins in four of five games, and nobody has been able to do this.

So they head to San Antonio tied 1-1. Since the NBA went to the 2-3-2 Finals format there have been 12 series tied after the first two and the home team is just 3-of-9 in those Game 3s. Including last year when the Heat beat the Thunder.

San Antonio got a split on the road in the first two games, Ginobili said if you had offered him that before the start of the series he would have taken it. But that’s not going to be enough on Game 3.

“We have three at home, so we’re excited about that. But if we play like we did tonight, that’s not going to matter,” Duncan said.

Dwight Howard commits ridiculously sloppy inbound violation (video)

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An embarrassing lack of focus by the Rockets? I can hardly believe it.

Late in a game against a team Houston is battling for playoff position, Dwight Howard was just careless, stepping on the baseline as he inbounded the ball. It’s a needless goof, and he’ll get plenty of deserved criticism for it.

But don’t overlook Patrick Beverley‘s frustration foul on Damian Lillard before the ensuing inbound. That was nearly as foolish and even more costly.

The sequence sparked a 7-0 run for the Trail Blazers, who seized control of the game en route to a 116-103 win.

DeAndre Jordan dunks on Marcus Smart before Smart knows what’s happening (video)

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Marcus Smart went to tag DeAndre Jordan on the pick-and-roll, and Jordan took off from so far from the basket, he was dunking on Smart before the Celtics guard could do a thing.

Chris Paul finds brilliant counter to hack-a-DeAndre Jordan (video)

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I originally favored allowing Hack-a-Shaq as the NBA currently does. I found the strategy fascinated – why and when teams would use it and how their opponents would counter.

But it just became too common. Far too many games featured a parade of trips to the line, a boring stretch that made games too long. I thought the intrigue had run its course.

Then, Chris Paul pulled this move last night.

The Clippers guard saw Jonas Jerebko charging toward DeAndre Jordan to commit an intentional foul, so Paul stepped in front of an unsuspecting Jerebko and took the foul himself. That’s sent a good free-throw shooter to the line instead of the dismal Jordan.

Just an awesome heady play by Paul.