Heat aren’t infallible, and it’s unfair to treat them as such

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When LeBron James and Chris Bosh joined Dwyane Wade in Miami, critics decried the end of competitive balance. They saw LeBron’s “Not one, not two, not three…” remark not as a hopeful boast, but as the inevitable. The Heat would win the championship every year from then on, and there was nothing anyone could do about it.

Three years later, we see the Heat have real vulnerabilities after all.

Just like every other team in NBA history.

It was ridiculous to assume the Big Three would carry the Heat to title after title without any resistance. There’s no question LeBron, Wade and Bosh joining forces made the Heat very good this season. But their level of contribution is not unprecedented, and previous great trios haven’t always led their teams to a championship.

Twelve other teams have had three players each post at least nine win shares (Bosh’s total this season) and combine for at least 37.9 win shares (the aggregate total for LeBron, Wade and Bosh this season). Half, including the 2011 Heat, didn’t win a championship:

  • 2013 Oklahoma City Thunder (Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and Serge Ibaka): Lost in second round
  • 2011 Miami Heat (LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh): Lost in NBA Finals
  • 2005 Phoenix Suns (Amar’e Stoudemire, Shawn Marion and Steve Nash): Lost in conference finals
  • 2000 Los Angeles Lakers (Shaquille O’Neal, Kobe Bryant and Glen Rice): Won championship
  • 1997 Utah Jazz (Karl Malone, John Stockton and Jeff Hornacek): Lost in NBA Finals
  • 1996 Chicago Bulls (Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen and Tony Kukoc): Won championship
  • 1996 Utah Jazz (Karl Malone, John Stockton and Jeff Hornacek): Lost in conference finals
  • 1992 Chicago Bulls (Michael Jordan, Horace Grant and Scottie Pippen): Won championship
  • 1991 Chicago Bulls (Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen and Horace Grant): Won championship
  • 1987 Boston Celtics (Larry Bird, Kevin McHale and Robert Parish): Lost in NBA Finals
  • 1972 Los Angeles Lakers (Wilt Chamberlain, Jerry West and Gail Goodrich): Won championship
  • 1971 Milwaukee Bucks (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Oscar Robertson and Bob Dandridge): Won championship

The Dallas Mavericks beat the Heat in the 2011 NBA Finals. The Boston Celtics took Miami to seven games in last year’s Eastern Conference Finals. And now, the Indiana Pacers have pushed the Heat to seven games in this season’s conference final.

At some point, we must realize that even the favorite can lose or get challenged without it being a monumental upset. I understand the Heat brought a lot of these expectations up themselves, but that doesn’t mean we have to indulge them. They deserve a high bar to measure their success, but a championship or bust is too high. Look at the top 10 regular-season records of all time. Miami doesn’t have a single one.

The Heat are a very good team playing another very good team, and that’s why this series is headed to a Game 7 tonight. It would clearly be an upset if Miami – with a better regular-season record, the league’s MVP, a higher payroll and more postseason experience – loses. But it wouldn’t be shocking, and we shouldn’t treat it as such.

Ex-financial adviser gets 4 years in federal prison for defrauding Tim Duncan

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SAN ANTONIO (AP) An ex-financial adviser to retired San Antonio Spurs player Tim Duncan has been sentenced to four years in federal prison for defrauding the former NBA star of millions of dollars.

Federal prosecutors say 49-year-old Charles Banks of Atlanta was sentenced during a court hearing Wednesday in San Antonio.

A judge also ordered Banks to pay $7.5 million in restitution.

Banks had pleaded guilty in April to one count of wire fraud.

Investigators say Banks manipulated Duncan -who retired last year after five NBA championships with the Spurs – into guaranteeing payment of a $6 million debt related to a merchandising business.

Prosecutors say Banks failed to disclose commissions and loans he received in the deal.

Banks is set to report to federal prison as early as Aug. 28.

Lakers exercise David Nwaba’s $1.3 million contract option

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EL SEGUNDO, Calif. (AP) — The Los Angeles Lakers have exercised their $1.3 million contract option on guard David Nwaba for the upcoming season.

The Lakers announced the move Wednesday.

Nwaba earned a job with the Lakers after they called him up from their D-League affiliate on Feb. 28. The rookie averaged 6.0 points and 3.2 rebounds per game while impressing Luke Walton’s coaching staff with his hustle and defensive play.

The Lakers signed him to a new contract with a multi-year component just three weeks after his NBA debut.

Nwaba is a local product, attending University High School in West Los Angeles and Santa Monica College before finishing his college career at Cal Poly.

Stephen Curry to play Web.com Tour’s Ellie Mae Classic

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HAYWARD, Calif. (AP) — Two-time NBA MVP Stephen Curry is set to test his golf game against the pros.

The Web.com Tour said Wednesday that Curry, coming off his second NBA championship with the Golden State Warriors, will play in the Ellie Mae Classic at TPC Stonebrae on Aug. 3-6.

It’ll be the first PGA Tour-sanctioned event for Curry, who has competed in various celebrity events and pro-ams. The top 25 on Web.com Tour’s regular-season money list will earn PGA Tour cards.

Curry will maintain his amateur status, competing on an unrestricted sponsor exemption in the event that benefits the Warriors Community Foundation.

Hall of Fame receiver Jerry Rice played in the event in 2011 and 2012. He missed the cut in 2011 with rounds of 83 and 76 and withdrew in 2012 after playing 27 holes in 23 over.

Also Wednesday, Nissan’s upscale Infiniti brand announced that Curry would be its new global brand ambassador. The point guard will be featured in ads for the Q50 sports sedan beginning this summer.

Report: Clippers never committed to offer Chris Paul five-year max contract

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The Clippers projected to be able to offer Chris Paul a five-year, $201 million contract that would have culminated with a $46 million salary in his final season.

Did they offer that much before sending him to the Rockets?

Just as one side is trying to pin all the Clippers’ problems on Doc Rivers and Austin Rivers, the Clippers surely want to spin Paul’s exit to another way – that they shrewdly chose when to part ways rather than that they lost the best player in franchise history due to nepotism.

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

If Paul really wanted that five-year max, he could have pushed harder for it by bringing counter offers to the Clippers in July rather than engineering his way to Houston before free agency even began.

Would the Clippers have eventually relented and offered the five-year max? We can never know for certain.

But it’s pretty clear why the Clippers would want this version out there. Accurate or not, it makes them seem far more on top of things and is less likely to taint them with free agents they covet in 2018.