Miami Heat's LeBron James reacts during their NBA Eastern Conference Final playoff series against the Indiana Pacers in Indianapolis

For LeBron, Heat, Game 7 is about legacy

49 Comments

The Miami Heat have made no bones about it — they want to go down as one of the great teams of all time.

They know that to do that it means hanging banners. Plural. LeBron knows that at the end of his career for him to be ranked among the all time greats he needs rings. Not one, not two….

Win on Monday night in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals and Miami will have made three straight trips to the NBA Finals with at least one win. They will have been tested but passed.

But if the big front line of the Indiana Pacers exposes the inherent flaws in Miami’s small ball and beats them — if the Heat lose Game 7 Monday night at home — there will be some real soul searching to do in South Beach.

They won one title with small ball, but is that sustainable? What roster changes are needed to continue contending? Then comes the bigger question of how a capped-out team can actually make any significant changes?

Win or lose, for the start of next season it is likely little would change in Miami — and it doesn’t need to, this is a 66-win team — but the bigger picture questions would go under a microscope after a loss.

A Heat loss would be fuel on the smoldering fire of “LeBron James is going to opt out in 2014 and go to __________.” Cavaliers, Lakers and the fans of 27 other fan bases will be convincing themselves LeBron can’t win in Miami anymore and he will bolt to them.

Don’t bet on him being inching to bolt. Nothing is impossible, but odds are still against it. He likes Miami. He can get more money and a longer contract from them (plus there are no state taxes). If LeBron thinks the window is closing on this roster, the real question is does he believe Pat Riley can restructure a team that can get him more rings? Obviously, there are advantages to recruiting young men to come to Miami.

Another storyline to be shaped by Game 7 — does Dwyane Wade have anything left? He has looked injured, older, slower and he can’t finish around the rim the same way. He has struggled this series, if he struggles in Game 7 and Miami loses, there chorus of “he’s too old and can’t stay healthy” will ringer ever lounder.

Riley and the Heat brain trust will be forced to make sure LeBron understands they plan to renovate the roster around him at some point, and there will be a more urgent consideration of “what is next?” Can they keep  Wade healthy? How do they attract better balanced talent? And to do that would it require shopping Chris Bosh around?

A loss in Game 7 would not fully shape the legacy of LeBron — he’s still just 28 — nor this version of the Miami Heat. In our instant decision world we want to think “they lose and LeBron bolts” when life is just not that clean and simple.

However, a loss forces a lot of questions to the surface and could portend bigger changes coming. Because now it’s not just about another ring, it’s about legacy.

Mitch McGary: ‘I messed up in my career in college, and now I’m kind of messing up my career here’

2014 Oklahoma City Thunder Media Day
Layne Murdoch/NBAE via Getty Images
Leave a comment

Mitch McGary declared for the NBA draft rather than serve a year-long suspension for marijuana in college. The Thunder big man was suspended twice – for a total of 15 games – this offseason for violating the NBA’s marijuana policy.

Oklahoma City has 16 players, one more than the regular-season roster limit, and McGary appears to be the odd man out. He has one guaranteed season remaining on his contract, but his overall behavior hurts his chances of getting a second shot with another NBA team.

In this backdrop, McGary tries to make a case for himself.

McGary, via Erik Horne of The Oklahoman:

“I would love to stay here and play here with new guys coming in; it would be very tough for me to get minutes here,” McGary said. “I’d love to stay with this organization. This is hands down like the best organization that had treats for you, cares for you, does everything for you, pretty much hand-feeds you. I’ve known that from guys around the league have said this is the organization to be with, so obviously I don’t want to leave.”

“If someone is willing to give me an opportunity to play, I just want to play ball, that’s it. Enough with the shenanigans. Hey, I messed up in my career in college, and now I’m kind of messing up my career here. But I’ve always gotten over that adversity and that’s what makes me a stronger person, and I think I’ve grown from this, even though it’s only been a few weeks since I’ve gotten handed the other suspension.

Said McGary: “Everybody is going to make mistakes. But I just don’t want to let this define me as a player.

McGary has been suspended for at least 720 minutes (15 games). He has played 557 minutes in the NBA.

Brett Brown assures Nerlens Noel he’ll get paid if he plays inside

Boston Celtics Vs. Philadelphia 76ers Exhibition Game
Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Leave a comment

As Nerlens Noel pointed out, the 76ers have too many young, talented big men – which is the biggest reason Philadelphia probably won’t extend Noel’s contract by the Oct. 31 deadline.

That has to be a little disappointing for Noel, who didn’t ask to be drafted by a franchise more preoccupied with asset accumulation than producing a winning fit and has an injury that lends itself to taking guaranteed money now.

But this isn’t Noel’s last chance to get paid, and his coach doesn’t want him sulking while battling Jahlil Okafor and Joel Embiid for minutes and space.

Brett Brown, via Keith Pompey of The Inquirer:

Brown wants him to focus on running rim to rim, scoring around the basket and being a defensive stopper.

“Personally, I don’t care if he ever makes a jump shot for the rest of his life,” the coach said. “I mean that. That’s not how his bread is buttered.”

“Nerlens has got elite gifts,” Brown said. “He’s as athletic and quick off the floor and quick rim to rim as anyone that I’ve coached, as any big man in the league.”

“Do your job and we will help you,” he added. “The league will reward that. The 76ers will reward that. He will be rewarded for playing like that.”

Brown is right. There’s no better way for Noel to earn money than by playing well. That means playing energetic defense, protecting the rim and hounding guards on hedges, and actively seeking easy looks near the basket on the other end.

If the 76ers trade him or Okafor before the season, Noel might even still get an extension. Absent that, he’ll head into restricted free agency.

If he’s coming off a year of playing to his strengths, it will be much more lucrative.

Pacers believe pieces are in place to play faster style

Indiana Pacers' Jeff Teague, left, poses with Paul George during an NBA basketball media day, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Indiana Pacers
Leave a comment

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana Pacers President Larry Bird spent most of his offseason trying to stitch together a championship contender.

He made two trades to create versatility. He added bulk by signing free agent Al Jefferson. He watched the Pacers’ biggest star, Paul George, return from the Olympics with a gold medal around his neck and a new perspective about making the Pacers a better team. And Bird hired a coach who shares his vision of what it takes to win in today’s NBA.

Now Indiana is about to find out if this bold, new look will produce better results than last year’s awkward attempt to use a smaller lineup with more 3-point shooters and putting some players, such as George, out of position.

George became a star at small forward but started the season playing power forward, an experiment that didn’t last long.

“Last year, we tried to play that spread-four and we tried to turn Paul and C.J. Miles into that spread four. Now he (Bird) has brought those guys in,” new coach Nate McMillan said Monday during the team’s annual media day. “Look, you’re going to have to be able to play half-court basketball because you can’t run for 48 minutes. I think the better teams will be able to slow you down, but I think we can play both ways now.”

How much and how quickly things change remains unclear.

Unlike last season, when it seemed Bird and George weren’t always on the same page and former coach Frank Vogel often wound up playing middle man between his best player and his boss, the second year of this transition already is off to a smoother start. George acknowledged Monday he’s willing to do whatever it takes to win this season – even if that requires playing some minutes as a stretch-four. McMillan even called the three-time All-Star and all-league defender a “versatile three.”

But the biggest difference will be George’s supporting cast.

Bird began the latest overhaul by acquiring All-Star point guard Jeff Teague in a three-team deal that sent George Hill to Utah. The trade left the 26-year-old George, now entering his seventh year with the team, as the longest-tenured Pacers’ player and the only remaining starter left from the 2013 and 2014 Eastern Conference runner-ups.

Then Bird sent Indiana’s first-round draft pick to Brooklyn for the nimble Thaddeus Young, who will play that stretch-four role, and plugged in second-year pro Myles Turner at center. He brought in the 60foot-10, 289-pound Jefferson to give the Pacers a bigger inside presence off the bench.

“It’s completely different. Last year, you had true bigs in the paint and scorers who would post up,” Young said. “Now you’ve got guys who can step out, make plays, make moves. We’re definitely going to try to push the tempo, push the pace.”

Everyone in this locker room seems to embrace the small-ball concept.

When Teague was asked about the prospect of teaming up with George and bringing the trendy new style to his hometown team, he responded with a beaming style. Turner and Young had similar reactions Monday, and George sounds as eager as anybody to see how everything will work.

“Hopefully, we’ll get a little faster,” George said. “I know that Jeff is a coast-to-coast guy, and I haven’t really played with a coast-to-coast guy before, so hopefully I can make it easier for him.”

Clearly, Bird believes he has the players to operate his preferred style, even if doesn’t look quite right when the Pacers open the season Oct. 26 against Dallas.

So McMillan will spend most of the next month trying to get all these new guys and the new lineups working together, in sync. And McMillan believes that if given time, the Pacers new style will be a good look.

“The game has changed,” McMillan said. “You’re seeing more pace teams that are trying to get between 90 and 100 possessions per game. How do you create that? You put together a roster that you can do that with, and I think the Pacers have done that. I think those (new) guys put us in position to pretty much paly any style we want to play.”

Note: George was asked whether he had any desire to re-do his contract, which can now be extended, and said: “Right now, it’s all about the season. I’m not even thinking about contract stuff. Everything is about going into the season.” Last week, Bird said he was willing to give George a new max contract whenever he’s ready. George’s current max deal runs through the 2018-19 season.

Bucks’ president calls Milwaukee “segregated, racist place”

3 Feb 2001:  A general view of the Milwaukee Bucks logo during the game against the Indiana Pacers at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Bucks defeated the Pacers 104-85.  NOTE TO USER: It is expressly understood that the only rights Allsport are offering to license in this Photograph are one-time, non-exclusive editorial rights. No advertising or commercial uses of any kind may be made of Allsport photos. User acknowledges that it is aware that Allsport is an editorial sports agency and that NO RELEASES OF ANY TYPE ARE OBTAINED from the subjects contained in the photographs.Mandatory Credit: Jonathan Daniel  /Allsport
Leave a comment

Milwaukee Bucks president Peter Feigin is learning a lesson that even people in the presidential race learned the hard way this year: In today’s era of connected media, you can’t say something aimed at one receptive audience and not expect it to get out to every audience, including those who may find it offensive.

Feigin was in Madison speaking to the Rotary Club of Madison about the Bucks’ new arena and how it will help the inner city parts of Milwaukee, but this is how he phrased it, according to the Wisconsin State Journal (via the Madison Business Journal and Fox 6 in Milwaukee).

“Very bluntly, Milwaukee is the most segregated, racist place I’ve ever experienced in my life. It just is a place that is antiquated. It is in desperate need of repair and has happened for a long, long time. One of our messages and one of our goals is to lead by example….“We know we can’t cure the world. But we are very determined to get ourselves involved in programs that we can measure a difference in and put our claws into for a long period of time and show a difference.”

“We know we can’t cure the world. But we are very determined to get ourselves involved in programs that we can measure a difference in and put our claws into for a long period of time and show a difference.”

As an outsider, I’m not going to pretend to know Milwaukee’s history of racial divide or how that plays out in the city at this point. If the Bucks are serious about helping bridge divides in the city, then good on them. More teams — and more players on teams — should help to do that, and NBA teams may be in a unique position to help bring sides together.

However, I’m not sure if what Feigin said will help that cause or just makes people more entrenched.

As noted by the Business Journal, the Bucks have pushed the contractors to hire Milwaukee city and Milwaukee County residents, and the organization has promised to pay at least $12 an hour for the service-sector jobs in the arena once it opens.