Pacers' West, Stephenson and George react near the end of Game 3 of their NBA Eastern Conference final basketball playoff series against the Heat in Indianapolis

Heat send a message with blowout Game 3 win over Pacers


The Heat didn’t only reclaim home court advantage in the Eastern Conference Finals with a lopsided 114-96 victory in Indiana on Sunday — they sent a message. Miami rolled from the very start, and in doing so reminded us of just how dominant this team was all season long.

In the first two games of the series in Miami, the Pacers seemed to be an excellent matchup for the Heat, and were able to use their size and team defense to keep each of those contests within reach until the final few possessions.

It’s clear the Heat didn’t take too kindly to facing the prospect of falling behind in the series, and Miami flipped a switch that few teams are capable of in lighting up the Pacers for a Game 3 destruction.

Miami put a ridiculous 70 points on the scoreboard by halftime, and shot almost 63 percent from the field in the process. LeBron James took to the low post to score seemingly at will over Paul George, and even did so with the left hand on more than one possession. The Pacers as a team did fine offensively, but were missing in action on the defensive end all night long. They allowed Udonis Haslem to have the breakout game of the night for the Heat, and the veteran big man finished with 17 points and seven rebounds in 23 minutes of action.

Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade were solid as usual for the Heat, and Mario Chalmers was big in the third quarter when Indiana made a brief surge in an attempt to close the halftime deficit.

Miami shot 54.5 percent from the field for the game, and turned the ball over just five times. Most teams will end up winning by putting up those kinds of numbers, but if the Heat are allowed to roam that freely offensively, the result will be disastrous.

The Heat would like to remind you that that they haven’t lost consecutive games since early January, and haven’t lost on the road since March 27. To think they’d drop their second straight in the playoffs to this Pacers team was apparently laughable, given the way Miami imposed its will from the very start.

After the Pacers established a mountain of momentum in the first two games of the series, Miami erased it all with 48 minutes of unstoppable and brilliant basketball. The Heat’s performance was so dominant that it’s worth wondering whether the Pacers will win another game to slow Miami’s inevitable march to the Finals.

Indiana will do its best, of course, to throw this one out as being just another game. But the doubt that Miami planted firmly in the heads of the Pacers players with its crushing Game 3 performance should be substantial enough that if the Heat play anywhere close to the level they proved capable of on Sunday, this series will be over in five.

Raptors unveil updated court design

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Several teams have updated their court designs this offseason, including the Bulls, Nuggets, Bucks and Hawks. The Raptors are the latest team to update their floor, to go along with a new logo and uniforms. Here’s what the Air Canada Centre will look like this season:

It features their new claw/basketball logo at center court and the font on their new uniforms at the baselines. The “We The North” along the sideline is a nice touch, too. Overall, the Raptors have done an excellent job with their rebrand, just in time for All-Star Weekend to be hosted in Toronto for the first time.

Former UCLA, NBA player Dave Meyers dies at 62

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LOS ANGELES (AP) Dave Meyers, the star forward who led UCLA to the 1975 NCAA basketball championship as the lone senior in coach John Wooden’s final season and later played for the NBA’s Milwaukee Bucks, died Friday. He was 62.

Meyers died at his home in Temecula after struggling with cancer for the last year, according to UCLA, which received the news from his younger sister, Ann Meyers Drysdale.

He played four years for Milwaukee after being drafted second overall by the Los Angeles Lakers. Shortly after, Meyers was part of a blockbuster trade that sent him to the Bucks in exchange for Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

The 6-foot-8 Meyers led UCLA in scoring at 18.3 points and rebounding at 7.9 in his final season, helping the Bruins to a 28-3 record. He had 24 points and 11 rebounds in their 92-85 victory over Kentucky in the NCAA title game played in his hometown of San Diego.

Meyers Drysdale also played at UCLA during her Hall of Fame career.

Meyers assumed the Bruins’ leadership role during the 1974-75 season after Bill Walton and Jamaal Wilkes had graduated. Playing with sophomores Marques Johnson and Richard Washington, Meyers earned consensus All-America honors. Meyers made the cover of Sports Illustrated after the Bruins won the NCAA title.

“One of the true warriors in (at)UCLAMBB history has gone on to glory,” Johnson wrote on Twitter. “Dave Meyers was our Captain in `75 and as tenacious a player ever. RIP.”

Johnson recalled in other tweets how Meyers called him `MJB’ or Marques Johnson Baby when he was a freshman, and later in the NBA, Meyers was nicknamed “Crash” because he always diving on the floor for loose balls.

As a junior, Meyers started on a front line featuring future Hall of Famers Walton and Wilkes.

Meyers was a reserve as a sophomore on the Bruins’ 1973 NCAA title team during the school’s run of 10 national titles in 12 years under Wooden. The team went 30-0 and capped the season by beating Memphis 87-66 in the championship game, when Meyers had four points and three rebounds.

In 1975, Meyers, along with Elmore Smith, Junior Bridgeman and Brian Winters, was traded to Milwaukee for Abdul-Jabbar and Walt Wesley.

During the 1977-78 season, Meyers was reunited with Johnson on the Bucks and averaged a career-best 14.7 points. He missed the next year with a back injury. Meyers returned in 1979-80 to average 12.1 points and 5.7 rebounds in helping the Bucks win a division title.

Born David William Meyers, he was one of 11 children. His father, Bob, was a standout basketball player and team captain at Marquette in the 1940s. The younger Meyers averaged 22.7 points as a senior at Sonora High in La Habra, California.

Meyers made a surprise announcement in 1980 that he was retiring from basketball to spend more time with his family. He later earned his teaching certificate and taught sixth grade for several years in Lake Elsinore, California.

He is survived by his wife, Linda, whom he married in 1975, and daughter Crystal and son Sean.