San Antonio Spurs v Memphis Grizzlies - Game Three

Spurs take commanding 3-0 lead over Grizzlies with overtime win in Game 3


The Grizzlies had been here before.

After falling behind two games to none in the first round of the playoffs against the Clippers, first by losing big in Game 1 and then by losing at the buzzer in Game 2, Memphis learned what it would take to crawl out of that hole and make the necessary adjustments by reclaiming its strength in the next two games of the series via home court advantage.

To open Game 3 of the Western Conference Finals facing a similar 2-0 deficit against the Spurs, the Grizzlies came out with the energy and aggression necessary to knock their opponent on their heels, on the way to jumping out to a first quarter lead of as many as 18 points.

But this veteran Spurs team knows that each game is a marathon as opposed to a sprint, and San Antonio was able to weather the early storm by coming back with a balanced and sustained methodical attack to force the game into overtime, where the Spurs eventually prevailed 104-93 to take a commanding three games to none lead in the series.

The Memphis attack was as formidable as it was blistering to start, where the Grizzlies forced seven turnovers inside of the game’s first seven minutes. The Grizzlies went up 16-5 to open the game, and in a rare moment of visible frustration, Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich subbed out all five members of his starting lineup with his team trailing by 11 just 7:07 into the game.

It didn’t help much initially, as Memphis extended its lead before the quarter was through. But after the initial burst wore off, the Spurs began to play their game, and erased almost all of the lead before halftime, thanks to Tony Parker and Tim Duncan playing an efficient brand of offense, while the Spurs defensively limited the Grizzlies to just 30.4 percent shooting in the second period.

The teams played largely even in the second half, but once we got to the overtime session, it was all Spurs.

San Antonio played with a precision and confidence offensively in the extra frame that Memphis was simply unable to match. The Spurs attacked and expected to score on every possession, while the Grizzlies seemed to hope they could defend well enough to extend the game, while scoring only when absolutely necessary. That was the reason the Spurs were able to put up 18 points in five minutes to seal the victory, while the Grizzlies, as they did for most of the game, struggled to score with any sense of ease.

Memphis hung its hat on the “grit and grind” label all season long, but we know now that more than anything else, that was simply a code for “smoke and mirrors.” It was a fun way of saying that while less talented, Memphis would somehow drag its opponents down to its level, and use its defense to slug out a grimy possession-by-possession based contest in hopes that the style and not the substance would wear down most opponents.

It worked for much of the season, and was especially effective in the playoffs until this point. But the Grizzlies have stalled against a Spurs team that values offensive execution above all else.

It’s true that Memphis has been here before, but they haven’t faced a team anywhere close to the quality of the Spurs in these playoffs; the Clippers were flawed, and the Thunder were at less than full strength. Now facing a deficit of 3-0 in the series, the Grizzlies are just a game away from seeing their magical run come to an end at the hands of a team that displays true grit on the court, instead of simply printing it on a t-shirt.

Timberwolves read mean tweets about themselves (video)

Flip Saunders, Karl-Anthony Towns, Tyus Jones
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The Timberwolves didn’t select the meanest tweets about these players, but credit Karl-Anthony Towns, Tyus Jones, Shabazz Muhammad and Zach LaVine for being good sports.

LeBron James: I’m healthier than a year ago


LeBron James received an injection in his back before the season.

It’s working.

Dave McMenamin of ESPN:

LeBron James now says he feels better than he did even a year ago.

“I feel better in the mornings; I feel better throughout the games; I feel better throughout the day,” James said before a Cavs shootaround Wednesday in preparation for their game against the Toronto Raptors. “It was a rough start to the season for me last year and for our team. Obviously the way we’ve been playing, a lot is predicated on my health and being able to lead these guys out on the floor and not from the sidelines.”

LeBron certainly looks healthier than he did at this point last year. He’s moving much better and giving more effort.

But comparing November to November means very little for the Cavaliers, who hope to play deep into June.

The key question: Did LeBron properly time his injection? There’s a limit on the number he can have in a year, and it takes time to recover after one. Cleveland doesn’t want LeBron to peak to early.

It’s good for the Cavs that LeBron feels better now, but his health in the playoffs remains the priority.

Report: Suns signing Bryce Cotton

Bryce Cotton
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Eric Bledsoe missed the Suns’ loss to the Spurs on Monday with a knee injury.

So, Phoenix is bringing in a reinforcement – Bryce Cotton.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

The Jazz waived Cotton before the season despite Dante Exum‘s injury leaving them with just two other healthy point guards. That says something about Cotton – but also Utah’s depth.

Cotton – who went undrafted out of Providence last year – is quick, varies his speed well and can leap. There’s reason to believe in his potential at age 23. But his 6-foot-1 frame limits him defensively, and he’s not much of a distributor.

Phoenix will rely on Brandon Knight and Ronnie Price at point guard if Bledsoe is unavailable. The Suns can also use fewer two-point guard lineups – giving more minutes at shooting guard to Devin Booker, Archie Goodwin and Sunny Weems.

Cotton provides insurance while Bledsoe is banged-up with what seems to be a minor injury. But he might have to show something to keep drawing an NBA paycheck once Bledsoe gets healthy.

Jimmy Butler wants Mason Plumlee to pay fine after scuffle (video)


Jimmy Butler and Mason Plumlee got into an altercation in the Bulls’ win over the Trail Blazers last night.

Plumlee lowered his head and tried to barrel through Butler’s chest on a Butler screen. Butler fell and retaliated by putting Plumlee in a leg lock, causing Plumlee to fall.

You might remember a leg lock as what Cavaliers guard Matthew Dellavedova did to Bulls forward Taj Gibson during last year’s playoffs. For all the talk then of Dellavedova being a dirty player, Butler seems particularly aggrieved after getting a technical foul, which comes with a $2,500 fine – the same penalty Dellavedova eventually received. (Plumlee got a flagrant foul.)

Butler, via Vincent Goodwill of CSN Chicago:

“He thought he was playing football for a second there,” Butler said. “Almost had to let the Fort Greene Projects out of me, Brooklyn, you know what I’m saying?”

It was said tongue in cheek considering Gibson was a few feet over and Butler wanted to draw some laughs. Gibson is a Brooklyn native and grew up in the Fort Greene Projects while Butler grew up in Tomball, Texas.

It was no laughing matter when he said he would find a way to approach Plumlee about the fine money, jokingly suggesting he would have his agent email him at “Mr. or something” and made a joke about Mike Dunleavy applauding Plumlee’s act.

Plumlee and Dunleavy are products of Duke University.

“Yeah, he cost me 2,500,” Butler said. “I’m not happy about that. Gonna ask him to pay me back and I’m not playing.”

Is that, or Or is it Dookie?

These are important questions – at least if you’re trying to turn the conversation away from your dirty play and toward your colorful quotes.