Kobe Bryant Michael Jordan

Kobe Bryant responds to Michael Jordan comparison from Phil Jackson


Phil Jackson has a new book coming out, so he will be spending plenty of time talking it up at various media outlets in the coming weeks. The tour has begun in earnest, and the juiciest quotes from the book are beginning to be released.

If there’s one subject Jackson can speak on with absolute authority, it’s the comparison between Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant — two of the game’s all-time greats that were catalysts for the Hall of Fame coach in winning all five of his Eleven Rings.

Bryant has come up on the short end of some of Jackson’s conclusions, primarily in the areas of defense, social interactions with teammates, and the way he approaches the game in general — the latter of which is explained in the following excerpt from the book, via Mike Bresnahan of the Los Angeles Times.

“Jordan was also more naturally inclined to let the game come to him and not overplay his hand, whereas Kobe tends to force the action, especially when the game isn’t going his way. When his shot is off, Kobe will pound away relentlessly until his luck turns. Michael, on the other hand, would shift his attention to defense or passing or setting screens to help the team win the game.”

None of it was damning criticism by any means, especially considering how Jordan is considered by many to be not just one of, but the greatest basketball player of all time. Bryant, however, isn’t one to idly stand by while his body of work is being evaluated in even a remotely negative fashion, and has undoubtedly been hearing about Jackson’s comments consistently since they’ve been unleashed.

On Friday, he posted a response.

It’s an interesting hypothetical, and people have definitely downgraded the greatness of Scottie Pippen over time, while conveniently failing to bring up his importance in all of those Bulls championships whenever the Kobe versus MJ conversations take place.

But more than the importance of teammates in Bryant’s role reversal scenario is the fact that Jordan has reached almost mythical status since his playing days have ended. The reality is that no one will ever live up to Jordan’s legend; Bryant has just been the one who’s come the closest.

Pelicans signing center Jerome Jordan

Marc Gasol, Jerome Jordan
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Through the first two weeks of training camp, the Pelicans have seen their frontcourt depth decimated by injuries to Alexis Ajinca and Omer Asik, both of whom are out for a few weeks. A deal with Greg Smith fell through after he failed a physical. Now, Yahoo’s Marc Spears reports that they’re signing former Knicks and Nets center Jerome Jordan as a short-term solution:

Jordan has only played 65 games in his career and hasn’t been spectacular, but the Pelicans need a body while their two centers are out. Anthony Davis will spend some time at center, but considering the contracts Asik and Ajinca got this summer, Alvin Gentry clearly plans on playing him at power forward as well, and they need a center to at least fill time before Asik and Ajinca get back.

Kevin Love unsure about opening-night return

Kevin Love
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He’s back in practice with the Cavaliers, but there’s still no clarity on whether Kevin Love will be available for the season opener. Love had shoulder surgery in April after suffering a torn labrum in Game 4 of the Cavs’ first-round series against the Celtics, and doctors initially gave him a timetable of four to six months for a return. The six-month end of that is right around opening night (October 27), but Love still doesn’t know whether he’ll be able to play against the Bulls—although he is hopeful.

Via the Sporting News‘ Sean Deveney:

“I feel pretty good,” Love told Sporting News. “As far as the opener goes, I am not completely sure. I’ll probably get with the doctors and see what they have to say. I know that my six-month post-op is coming up here pretty fast. As far as getting the strength back, getting the range of motion, I feel pretty good, so I am looking forward to getting into some more contact, getting into a rhythm and getting out there as quickly as I can.”

Love has been cleared for 3-on-3 practices, but not yet for 5-on-5. If it were up to him, he’d be back on the court, but he understands he needs to follow the rehab protocol for his injury.

“(Six months is) just a ballpark figure that has generally been thrown out there by anybody who has talked about the rehab process for this kind of an injury,” Love said. “I like to think that I am ahead of the game, but there’s different tests and the due diligence that the doctor will go through and the training staff will go through. So all I can do is go out there every day and attack my rehab and hopefully I will be able to go out there and help these guys as soon as possible.”

At the very least, the Cavs will be without Kyrie Irving (still recovering from knee surgery) and Iman Shumpert (out up to three months with a wrist injury), and probably Tristan Thompson too, unless his contract situation changes unexpectedly. So having Love available would be some much-needed good news. But it’s more important that Love (and everyone else) is healthy for the playoffs. If he’s not ready to play, there’s no need to rush back for an October game.