Knicks forward Anthony gets past Indiana Pacers forward George during the second half of an NBA Eastern Conference second round playoff basketball game in Indianapolis

Preview: Knicks can shoot their way out of 2-1 hole to Pacers


The Knicks have fundamental problems against the Pacers, primarily rebounding. It’s virtually impossible for New York to re-invent itself this deep into the playoffs, and consequently, a big and physical Indiana team will likely continue holding an advantage on the glass. But that doesn’t mean the Knicks are doomed, and there’s a simple way form them to overcome their deficiency:

Make shots.

More specifically, make 2-point shots.

The Knicks bombed their way to the NBA’s third-best regular-season offense on the strength of their 3-point shooting. New York scored 33 percent of its points on 3-pointers, the league’s top mark.

In Game 3, the Knicks’ biggest problem 3-point problem was generating attempts. The Pacers don’t help much on defense, so New York’s shooters couldn’t get open, and the Knicks shot just 3-for-11 from beyond the arc. That was the first time this season they didn’t take at least 18 3-pointers.

The solution might be more mid-range shots.

NBA teams have mostly realized shots at the rim and 3-pointers are more efficient than any other area of the court. So, teams are tilting their defenses to cover shots at the rim and 3-pointers. At some point, teams will go so far with that defensive approach that they vacate the area between the paint and arc, making mid-range shots efficient. We’re not there yet league-wide – and probably not even close – but maybe the Knicks have reached that point in this series. The Pacers have just defended 3-pointers and shots at the rim so well.

It also helps the Knicks have a couple players comfortable in the mid-range, Carmelo Anthony and J.R. Smith. No team had two players with as many mid-range makes as Melo and Smith.

Of course, there’s a difference between isolation mid-range shots and mid-range shots that come from pick-and-rolls and good ball movement, and New York should look for the latter.

The Knicks turned the ball over least in the NBA during the regular season, and they’re turning it over even less against the Pacers. That’s partially because Indiana focuses on causing misses and rebounding them rather than forcing turnovers, but it’s also because New York hasn’t taken enough strategic risks in moving the ball.

If the Knicks pass well and make their mid-range shots, maybe Roy Hibbert will have to pay a little more attention outside the paint on pick-and-rolls. That could open lobs for Tyson Chandler, putbacks for Kenyon Martin and more.

But it all starts with making shots.

Spurs to give Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili Friday night off in Denver

Manu Ginobili, Harrison Barnes, Tim Duncan
Leave a comment

The Spurs are 12-3 and comfortably in second place in the West, they have the best defense in the NBA allowing just 93.8 points per 100 possessions, and they have a top-10 offense to go with it.

So, time to start making sure guys are rested.

That is the first night of a back-to-back, with former Spurs’ assistant coach Mike Budenholzer and his Atlanta Hawks coming to San Antonio on Saturday. Popovich is saving his two veterans for that game.

Duncan and Ginobili have looked like they found the fountain of youth this season. Duncan is taking on less of the offense but has been very efficient in those moments. Ginobili has the impact he did a few years back in his bench role.

What Gregg Popovich cares about is them playing like that come the postseason. So they will rest on Friday.

Brandon Armstrong impersonates Ray Allen (video)

2014 NBA Finals - Game Five
Leave a comment

Ray Allen is retired-ish, but he’ll always be running through screens – in our mind and in this video.

Celtics draft pick Marcus Thornton gets beer dumped on head during Australian game (video)

Marcus Thornton, Will Cherry

The Celtics drafted Marcus Thornton with No. 45 pick in the 2015 NBA draft. That essentially entitled him to the required tender – a one-year contract offer, surely unguaranteed at the minimum.

Thornton rejected that, which is almost always a mistake.

Rejecting the tender is a favor to the drafting team, which gets to keep the player’s exclusive rights for a year. If Thornton tries to join the NBA now, he’s stuck negotiating with only the Celtics.

By accepting the tender, the player typically gets one of two outcomes. He either plays on that contract and draws an NBA salary or he gets waived. But even getting waived is better than rejecting the tender, because at least the player becomes a free agent and can negotiate with any team.

Players who reject the tender go to another league and play for less money. In Thornton’s case, that mean Australia.

How’s that going?

(Almost) never reject the required tender as a second-round pick.

Byron Scott says they just have to get Kobe Bryant better looks

Kobe Bryant, Joe Johnson, Byron Scott

Kobe Bryant is averaging 15.2 points a game at age 37. It’s just taking him 16.4 shots per game to get there. After his 1-of-14 shooting performance against the Warriors the other night — with too much isolation and too many plays run just for him — there has been a lot of talk about his shot. With reason, this is his shot chart so far this season.

Kobe shotchart season

So what do the Lakers’ do? Get Kobe to shoot less and get the ball in the hands of the young stars they supposed to be developing more? Nah.

They just need to get Kobe better looks, Scott told the Los Angeles Times.

“I know his mentality is that he can still play in this league,” Scott said. “And we feel the same way….

“Obviously he’s struggling right now with his shot, and I think everybody can see that,” Scott said. “So it’s trying to get him in better position to be able to have an opportunity to knock those shots down on a consistent basis. That’s No. 1.

“I don’t know if it’s his legs. I don’t think so. Again, our conversations are pretty blunt. … He tells me when he is tired and he tells me when he’s not tired. And the last few days, he said he feels great. So, I don’t think it’s a matter of him being tired or his legs being tired. I think it’s a matter of his timing being a little off.”

Yes, how could it be his legs? It’s not like he’s a 37-year-old with more than 55,000 NBA minutes played, and coming off an Achilles rupture and major knee surgery.

Honestly, I hope the Lakers and Kobe find a balance soon, because they have become just hard to watch. And I don’t want Kobe to go out this way.