Golden State Warriors guard Klay Thompson reacts after hitting a three-point shot against the San Antonio Spurs during their NBA basketball game in San Antonio, Texas

Klay Thompson shoots the Warriors past the Spurs to win Game 2, even the series

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In many ways, Game 2 between the Warriors and the Spurs was similar to Game 1. Golden State got out to a large lead behind one of its guards shooting the lights out, and San Antonio was stuck playing from behind the rest of the way.

The first game of the series saw the Spurs go on an incredible late run to erase their opponent’s early success, and they were able to pull it out after more than one overtime session. There would be no such heroics on this night, as the Warriors held off San Antonio 100-91 to steal home court advantage and even the series at a game apiece.

In Game 1, Stephen Curry was the one doing the damage for the Warriors. But after a decent first half in Game 2, he was largely held in check the rest of the night.

Klay Thompson was the killer for Golden State from the very start, pouring in 29 first half points while knocking down seven of his eight attempts from three-point distance. The Warriors built a lead of 19 points by halftime on the strength of Thompson’s hot hand, and unlike the first game of the series, were able to get just enough in the second half to keep the Spurs at bay.

Thompson finished with a game high 34 points and 14 rebounds, on 13-of-26 shooting, including 8-of-9 from beyond the three-point arc. He also did an excellent job defensively in helping to limit Tony Parker, who finished just 7-of-17 from the field with 20 points. Thompson fouled out near the end of regulation in Game 1 just before the Spurs embarked on their huge comeback, and his defense was sorely missed.

The Warriors cooled considerably in the second half, as Thompson and Curry combined to shoot 5-of-19 from the field over the game’s final two periods. The Spurs once again made a run, and twice cut the lead to six in the fourth quarter. But despite the overall low shooting percentage that Golden State suffered through in the second half, the team managed to find an answer offensively each time — first with a three from Draymond Green, and later with an incredible scoop shot finger roll from Curry with under four minutes to play that extended his team’s lead back to eight.

San Antonio tried to shoot their way back into it quickly from distance, yet managed to connect on just five of its 14 second half attempts from three-point range.

There are a lot of positives the Warriors will take with them back home to Oracle Arena for the next two games. They were able to get both of their guards going separately in each of the first two games, and they showed maturity in Game 2 by not collapsing again as they had in Game 1 of the series.

For the Spurs, the lesson is clear. If you let Curry or Thompson get loose early, they’ll torch you for a big performance that will be extremely difficult to stop. Both Mark Jackson and Gregg Popovich had their own take on the Warriors’ stellar shooters after this one.

“I thought it was polite of them to at least take turns and not both be on fire on the same night,” Popovich joked.

Jackson, however, was much more proud in praise of his guys.

“I’ve said, I’ve got the greatest shooting backcourt that’s ever played the game,” Jackson said. “Call my bluff.”

The Spurs would be wise not to do that for the remainder of this series.

Report: Pelicans trying to trade Terrence Jones

AUBURN HILLS, MI - FEBRUARY 01: Terrence Jones #9 of the New Orleans Pelicans gets off a shot next to Aron Baynes #12 of the Detroit Pistons during the first period at the Palace of Auburn Hills on February 1, 2017 in Auburn Hills, Michigan. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
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After their trade today, the Pelicans have the NBA’s most dynamic big-man tandem: Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins.

Davis and Cousins are tall, athletic and skilled in a combination we might have never seen from any power forward-center duo since Charles Barkley-Hakeem Olajuwon. New Orleans’ two could thrive together, and while they develop chemistry, they’ll each likely get minutes without the other.

That doesn’t leave much playing time for someone like Terrence Jones.

Chris Haynes of ESPN:

Jones settled for a one-year minimum contract after an injury-plagued and inconsistent tenure with the Rockets. His inconsistency remains, but considering his salary, his highs more than justify dealing with the lows. At just 25, Jones could still figure out how to reliably contribute.

Jones’ contract dictates he be rental, which will lower his trade value. But he could help teams trying to win down the stretch — including New Orleans.

Dante Cunningham seems more favored at power forward, and Donatas Motiejunas can fill in. But the Pelicans could still use Jones.

Shopping him might be a favor to the player, but we’ll see whether an actual trade is part of the gesture.

Source: Other team pulled ‘better’ trade offer for DeMarcus Cousins due to agent’s threat

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The Kings traded DeMarcus Cousins and Omri Casspi to the Pelicans for a first-round pick, a second-round pick, Buddy Hield, Tyreke Evans and Langston Gallowayshockingly little return for Sacramento’s franchise player.

“I had a better deal two days ago,” Kings general manager Vlade Divac said.

Um, what?

Divac made Sacramento look foolish with that quote, but according to a league source, the problem was more poor communication with the media — something Divac is no stranger to — than terrible trading.

According to the source, the potential trade partner made an offer only to pull it once Cousins’ camp threatened the star center wouldn’t re-sign in 2018. Cousins’ agent, Jarinn Akana, publicly said before the New Orleans deal was consummated that it was “highly unlikely” Cousins would re-sign with any team that trades for him.

The trade made Cousins ineligible to become a designated veteran player, costing him at least a projected $29.87 million on his next deal. So, Cousins had clear incentive to stay in Sacramento.

Another source involved in Cousins trade discussions confirmed Cousins’ camp attempted to dissuade teams from trading for him, though that source did not confirm a pulled offer.

It’s unclear whether the Kings could have completed the “better” offer before the other team pulled out. The offer was presented as available to Sacramento for a day or two, according to the first source, though the other team could have always backed away at any point as it received more information.

This situation isn’t unfamiliar to anyone who follows college recruiting, where there are differences between offers, Offers and committable offers and everyone has their own definitions of each term.

Divac has struggled as Sacramento’s general manager, and his track record opens him to the type of mocking he received in the wake of his “better offer” remarks. But, though there’s still some mystery in the Kings’ trade process, attacking Divac based solely on this comment is probably piling on too far.

There are already enough reason to believe Sacramento erred on this deal.

John Wall’s reaction to the Cousins’ trade is to have a drink (VIDEO)

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It was a strange situation in the “mix room” interview zone after the All-Star Game Sunday, the place the majority of players went for a post-game media obligation (MVP Anthony Davis, the coaches, and a few other players who had big games such as Russell Westbrook went to a different, larger room).

Strange because in the three hours or so the players had been away from their phones and social media accounts, the DeMarcus Cousins trade had gained steam and seemed destined to be done (the story the deal was done broke about 15-20 minutes later). The players walked in and had no idea what had happened — including Cousins.

But I loved John Wall‘s reaction.

When the news broke about the Cousins trade, it seemed everyone needed a drink. Wall had his recovery drink handy — notice the label was stripped off of the bottle, meaning it was not the NBA sponsor’s product — so he went with that.

Kyrie Irving on All-Star Game: ‘I would love to play in a competitive game’

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NEW ORLEANS — The NBA All-Star Game is supposed to be a star-studded exhibition, and not one necessarily aimed at the core of basketball fans. Sort of like the Super Bowl, the goal of the All-Star Game is to suck in the casual fan to watch both great athleticism and the show around it — The Roots, John Legend and on down the line. In the city the weekend of the event, it’s as much about showing league sponsors a good time as it is basketball.

Let’s be honest, the basketball itself isn’t good. From the Rising Stars challenge through the All-Star Game itself, there’s matador defense and cherry picking all game long. The defense was so bad Stephen Curry was literally laying down on the job.

Kyrie Irving would like to see that change, and he speaks for at least some players.

“For me, I would love to play in a competitive game,” Irving said. “I know we play in competitive games in the summer, pickup games, but I think going forward, the All-Star experience will probably get a little harder in terms of defense going forward.”

Will it? Guys are trying not to get hurt and — like the entire weekend itself — are focused on the fun off the court far more than anything on it.

“It’s all in good fun, but I definitely think that, if we want a competitive game, guys will probably have to talk about it before the game,” Irving said.

The onus to change this falls to the players, something. West coach Steve Kerr echoed.

“I think that in the past, at least generally in the fourth quarter, guys have picked it up. That’s what I was expecting. It didn’t happen (Sunday),” Kerr said. “I would like to see it more competitive. I’m not sure how to do it. It’s up to the players really.

“As a coach in the All-Star game, you ever seen that movie ‘Weekend At Bernie’s’? They might as well just bring a couple dead bodies on the sidelines. We’re not doing anything up there. Just prop us up.”

To get guys to play harder, the league is going to have to find an incentive to motivate the players. Currently, the winning team’s players get $50,000 each, the losing team $25,000 — while that extra $25K would make a big difference in your life or mine, for All-Stars with eight-figure annual salaries it doesn’t matter as much as staying healthy and getting some rest.

“It would be good to possibly incentivize the guys somehow, Kerr said. “I don’t know if you can maybe get their charities involved or winner-take-all type thing, but I think it’s possible to play a lot harder without taking a charge. We know what silly is out there, if you’re undercutting guys, but it’s almost gone too far the other way where there’s just no resistance at all. I think there’s a happy medium in there somewhere.”

There is, but until the NBA comes up with a new plan we’re not going to see it All-Star Weekend.