Jrue Holiday and Evan Turner: 76ers should hire Michael Curry

4 Comments

Though Doug Collins’ departure from the 76ers was framed as his decision, it seemed Philadelphia wasn’t exactly heartbroken to see him go. But the three-year Collins era with the 76ers was a relative success. They made the postseason for consecutive years for the first time since 2008 and 2009 and a playoff series for the first time since 2003.

Even this season, with Andre Iguodala traded and Andrew Bynum out all year, the 76ers had a better record (34-48) than they did the year before Collins’ arrival (27-55).

Would Philadelphia look within for a replacement, hoping to retain the positive aspects of the Collins regime?

Jrue Holiday and Evan Turner hope so. John N. Mitchell of The (Philadelphia) Inquirer:

Jrue Holiday, who has voiced his opinion that the Sixers should consult him during the search, cast his vote for the promotion of associate coach Michael Curry.

“I’ve known him for the last three years,” Holiday said Wednesday in a telephone interview. “He’s somebody I trust, and somebody I’d love as a head coach.”

Evan Turner, who also had his best season in his first campaign as a starter, also endorsed a Curry promotion.

Turner admitted that he and Collins clashed at times. In those moments, according to Turner, he often looked to Curry to smooth the waters.

“He was great because he was calm in certain situations, and that helps,” Turner said. “He never really panicked. That’s something that players need.”

Curry served as the Pistons’ head coach in 2008-09, when the team went 39-43. The Pistons fired him after just that season, and most around Detroit found the move completely reasonable.

The team had internal dysfunction (fueled by an in-season trade for Allen Iverson that would be difficult for any coach to handle, but was handled especially poorly by Curry, who also alienated Richard Hamilton in the process) and questionable schemes at times (I recall a zone/man defense hybrid that players said they didn’t understand). In short, Curry seemed in over his head.

In hindsight, perhaps the Pistons were too tough on him. They haven’t finished better than 25-41 since and have fired John Kuester and Lawrence Frank.

Plus, many coaches get better in their second head-coaching stint. That should especially be true of Curry, who spent just one year as an assistant before becoming Detroit’s head coach.

But assistant coaches often play buffer between players and the head coach, and just because, as Turner said, Curry filled that role well, that doesn’t mean Curry would be a good head coach. He’s young enough (44) and savvy enough that he will get another chance as a head coach, though.

Thankfully for the 76ers, they should be in the best possible position to know whether he deserves that opportunity right now. And it matters a great deal that two of their players, including their All-Star, say yes.

Utah’s Donovan Mitchell wins throwback Dunk Contest with Vince Carter tribute

Getty Images
2 Comments

LOS ANGELES — The 2018 Dunk Contest went retro.

And it worked.

The throwbacks started with Cleveland’s Larry Nance Jr. going quick-change to pay tribute to his father, the 1984 winner of the Dunk Contest.

Nance later had the best dunk of the night, but it wasn’t enough in the face of Utah’s Donovan Mitchell‘s strong and consistent night highlight by his throwback dunk — donning a Vince Carter Toronto dinosaur jersey and doing VC’s famed 360 dunk — which got Mitchell the 48 points he needed to hold-off Nance and win the contest. It was over.

“Growing up I was a big dunker,” Mitchell said. “I wasn’t really much of a basketball player. I just dunked and played defense, and I watched a lot of Vince’s videos. I’ve been seeing what he’s been doing all year at his age, which is incredible.

“So I figured, you know, at my size if I was able to get it, it would be a great dunk and a way to finish it, you know. And actually, funny story is I haven’t made that dunk in like half a year. I tried it in practice the past two days and tried it this morning, didn’t make it. Tried it last night, didn’t make it… But to be able to make it was why I was so excited.”

Earlier in the night, Mitchell had done another tribute worn a Darrell Griffith jersey — Utah’s Dr. Dunkenstien, who went to Louisville like Mitchell — for an off-the-side-of-the-backboard jumping over Kevin Hart dunk.

“You know, just knowing your history, I think, is the biggest thing,” Mitchell said of the throwbacks. “Just understanding where this game originated, I guess the OGs of the game, I guess you would call it. But just understanding. Even if it’s just dunking. Whether it’s dunking in the NBA in general, Darrell Griffith, we went to the same school in college. I know Darrell very well. Both got drafted by the Jazz, and he was an incredible player. To be able to pay homage to him meant a lot to me.”

For my money, Nance had the dunk of the night, his first in the Finals, a double off-the-backboard throwdown that you had to see on replay to get (it wasn’t as evident in the building what he had done until it was re-shown on the big screen).

It was a fun contest all night long.

Mitchell (the leader in the Rookie of the Year race) started it off brilliantly — he brought out a second backboard, and did a self-alley-oop off one to the other.

Larry Nance Jr. did his tribute to his father with his first dunk, and on his second one came from behind the backboard, going around the world, and threw it down hard. That got him into the Finals.

Oladipo missed all three of his dunks in the first round, which almost doomed his night. He, however, did a dunk wearing the Black Panther mask for his second dunk, which impressed.

Mitchell said he wanted to beat Dennis Smith Jr. because the Mavericks’ point guard had beaten him in dunk contests for years. Smith had one monster dunk, when he went between the legs and threw it down hard and got the full 50. It just wasn’t enough to get Smith to the Finals.

Nance started off the final round by bringing out his father again to throw an alley-oop to a windmill. Mitchell responded with a self-alley-oop to a windmill that was flat-out wicked. That got Mitchell a 50-46 lead after one round of the Finals.

Then Mitchell went to Vince Carter and “it was over.”

Larry Nance Jr. throws alley-oop to himself, throws alley-oop to himself (video)

Leave a comment

LOS ANGELES — Cavaliers forward Larry Nance Jr. immediately motioned for the replay to be shown of this dunk. It was necessary to properly appreciate it.

Best dunk of the night.

Donovan Mitchell won the dunk contest, though.

Larry Nance Jr. plays tribute to father — rock-the-cradle dunk in Suns uniform

Associated Press
1 Comment

LOS ANGELES — Back in 1984, high-flying Larry Nance Sr. won the first NBA All-Star Dunk Contest with this set of dunks — most famously a rock-the-cradle move.

Larry Nance Jr. came into the 2018 Dunk Contest and went nostalgic — all the way back to the Suns’ throwback uniform and the same dunk.

That and a good second dunk got him into the Dunk Contest finals. In that round, Nance Sr. threw an alley-oop to his son for the windmill.

Donovan Mitchell throws alley-oop to himself – off second backboard (video)

Leave a comment

LOS ANGELES – Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell set a high standard with the first slam of the 2018 dunk contest.

Very creative. Very well-executed.

Looks like all that preparation paid off.