Preview: Knicks can win Game 2, they just need to do what Bernard King said

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The Knicks are not going to change who they are Tuesday night.

After the Pacers beat the Knicks in Game 1 Sunday, when the Pacers size and physicality up front proved a problem for the Knicks, there was some talk of them going big (starting Kenyon Martin at the four and bumping Carmelo Anthony to the three).

But the Knicks got the No. 2 seed in the East playing small ball with Anthony at the four this year and they are going to stick with it. Good. Changing identities at this point is a bad idea.

But if the Knicks are going to even this series out a few things have to happen — a couple of them outlined by Bernard King (or his friend) on twitter, before the oversensitive Knicks made him shut down his account (way to treat your Hall of Famer).

1) Share the ball. The Knicks had 15 assists on 35 made baskets in Game 1. In the playoffs, they have assisted on 45 percent of their baskets (they averaged 52.7 percent in the regular season). The Pacers are too good defensively; if you don’t share the rock all your shots will be contested. What this means to me is more Jason Kidd and less J.R. Smith. And sharing the ball will likely lead to more points in the paint because you have to get Roy Hibbert’s feet moving and not let him anchor the paint.

2) More Raymond Felton/Tyson Chandler pick-and-roll. It doesn’t just have to be a 1/5 pick-and-roll, run some 4/5 with Anthony. But the Knicks had success with side P&R in the first quarter of Game 1, then went away from it and had more isolation sets. How’d that work out for you? Exactly. Also, this works to get Hibbert moving and out of the paint.

3) Shore up the defense. The Pacers are not a great offensive team, but they are better than the Rondo-less Celtics — Paul George can create, David West is a pick-and-pop force with some post moves, and Roy Hibbert has his groove back. They will score if you don’t challenge and contest them, and what made it difficult in Game 1 is the Pacers showed balance and scored a variety of ways. This isn’t something as simple as changing pick-and-roll coverage, the Knicks have to be generally sharper. They can be. The Knicks are a better defensive team than they showed in Game 1, but they have to tighten things up.

For the Pacers, it comes back to defense then getting some easy buckets in transition. The physicality of the Pacers in Game 1 threw the Knicks off their stride — keep on doing it. Felton said the Pacers were dirty and going after ‘Melo’s sore shoulder, you should tell him “welcome to the playoffs.” Play a little edgy, take a few calls. That’s fine, just don’t let the Knicks get comfortable in their offense. Do that, turn some of those Knicks misses in to easy transition buckets the other way, and you can take a stranglehold on this series.

DeMarcus Cousins answers first several Kings-related questions same way (video)

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DeMarcus Cousins had a bitter exit from the Kings, but that won’t be the last they see of him.

Cousins’ Pelicans will host Sacramento tomorrow night.

Not that Cousins rushed to talk about the matchup.

Justin Verrier of ESPN:

Cousins is pretty funny when joking with the media, and his smile is contagious. Just listen to all the laughs Cousins generates as he goes through his shtick.

Bonus points to Cousins for eventually breaking down and providing real answers. Some of his relationships in Sacramento were clearly meaningful to him, and he wanted to acknowledge those — even if he’d prefer just to get past this awkward game and all the talk it invites.

Report: Sweet-shooting 7-footer Lauri Markkanen leaving Arizona for NBA draft

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Lauri Markkanen is 7-foot and made 42% of his 3-pointers this season.

That combination alone will have NBA teams drooling, and the Arizona freshman will capitalize.

Evan Daniels of Scout:

Arizona’s Lauri Markkanen is declaring for the NBA Draft and is expected to sign with an agent, multiple sources told Scout.

Markkanen seems pretty certain to get picked in the lottery, likely in the top 10.

Calling him a good shooter for his height undersells him. It’s not just he shoots so efficiently from deep, it’s that he can generate 3-pointers in so many ways — pick-and-pops, spot-ups, off off-ball screens and even running pick-and-rolls himself. Having the height to shoot over defenders is his most noticeable asset, but don’t undersell his mobility.

Markkanen also finishes well at the rim and offensively rebounds at extremely impressive clip for someone who spends so much time on the perimeter. Those interior skills instill belief he will eventually become a suitable defender.

There are a couple red flags. He’s old for a freshman, turning 20 before the draft. He leaves plenty to be desired defensively, especially due to his lack of strength.

But his size and shooting are tantalizing. That’s plenty for now.

Dwyane Wade wowed by jumping, around-the-back alley-oop pass in McDonald’s All-American Game (video)

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Watch for Collin Sexton in the 2018 NBA draft.

In the meantime, the Alabama commit had all eyes — include Dwyane Wade‘s — on him with this pass in the McDonald’s All-American Game last night.

Carmelo Anthony on shrinking role with Knicks: ‘I see the writing on the wall… I’m at peace with that’

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Carmelo Anthony scored just nine points on 12 shots in the Knicks loss to the Heat last night — well below his season averages of 22 points on 19 shots per game.

Anthony, via Ian Begley of ESPN:

“I see the writing on the wall. I see what it is,” Anthony said late Wednesday night. “I see what they’re trying to do, and it’s just me accepting that. That’s what puts me at peace. Just knowing and understanding how things work. I’m at peace with that.”

Is Anthony talking about just the Knicks’ final dozen games of this season, when they’re clearly interesting in testing less-proven players? Or is he referring to his entire tenure in New York?

Anthony has said he’d consider waiving his no-trade clause if the Knicks want to rebuild, and they’ll reportedly try again to trade him this offseason. Perhaps, this is Anthony indicating he’s warming up to the idea of allowing a trade.

Anthony’s and Kristaps Porzingis‘ timelines are barely compatible, if at all. It’d make sense for the Knicks to go in a different direction.

Could Anthony be at peace with that?