Miami Heat's LeBron James reads the label on his Most Valuable Player trophy during a news conference held by the NBA and Miami Heat in Miami

LeBron James named MVP, misses becoming unanimous selection by a single vote


The news we’ve known about for a few days now became official on Sunday, as LeBron James was named the league’s Most Valuable Player for the fourth time in his career.

There was no suspense surrounding the crowning of James, but there was some curiosity to see whether or not he might be a unanimous winner of the award for the first time in league history.

He was not.

James received 120 out of 121 first place votes, and one second place vote. The player who received LeBron’s missing first place vote was Carmelo Anthony of the New York Knicks.

This matters little in the grand scheme of things, as James will receive his fourth trophy just as he would have had he received every last one of those first place votes. But much like the MVP race in 2000, when Shaquille O’Neal’s season was similarly dominant and he missed out on being the unanimous choice by way of a single vote that went to Allen Iverson, it’s going to be fodder for discussion.

The NBA awards are voted upon anonymously by members of the media, so unless the person who gave Anthony that first place vote decides to reveal himself, we’ll never know the reasoning behind the decision. Something tells me, however, that whoever didn’t vote for James will be more than happy to spend a few moments in the spotlight.

The complete results of the balloting are listed below. Kevin Durant, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, and Kobe Bryant rounded out the top five.

Player, Team                                    1st               2nd              3rd               4th           5th                 Total Points

LeBron James, Miami                      120             1                  –                  –              –                    1,207

Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City             –                  93               21               2              3                   765

Carmelo Anthony, New York                1                  16               51               27           17                 475

Chris Paul, L.A. Clippers                       –                  2                  27               39           23                 289

Kobe Bryant, L.A. Lakers                      –                  4                  12               23           27                 184

Tony Parker, San Antonio                     –                  2                  7                  8              13                 86

Tim Duncan, San Antonio                    –                  2                  1                  12           10                 65

James Harden, Houston                        –                  –                  –                  7              12                 33

Russell Westbrook, OKC                          –                  –                  –                  1              6                   9

Dwyane Wade, Miami                              –                  –                  1                  –              –                    5

Stephen Curry, Golden State                     –                  –                  –                  –              3                   3

Kevin Garnett, Boston                                –                  –                  –                  –              1                   1

David Lee, Golden State                             –                  –                  –                  –              1                   1

Ty Lawson, Denver                                     –                  –                  –                  –              1                   1

Marc Gasol, Memphis                                –                  –                  –                  –              1                   1

Joakim Noah, Chicago                              –                  –                  –                  –              1                   1

Stan Van Gundy rips ‘selfish’ Pistons

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The Pistons had just 19 assists – to 22 turnovers – in their 93-83 loss to the Nets last night.

Stan Van Gundy was none too pleased.

On offensive problems:

I told them in there – that was the first thing – we’re not playing together at all. I thought it was a very selfish performance, and guys wouldn’t just pass the ball to open men. They wanted to see if they could take one more dribble to get their own shot, so the passing angles were gone. I just thought we forced play after play after play. We’re not willing to move the ball

On Reggie Jackson, who scored seven points on 3-of-10 shooting with six assists and six turnovers, and was coming off Achilles soreness:

He was not good at all. He was forcing everything.

On injuries to point guards – Jackson, Brandon Jennings and Steve Blake – hindering the team’s flow in practice and that carrying over to the game:

We could probably make a lot of excuses for our guys, but we were selfish.

Van Gundy is clearly trying to send a message, and the preseason is the best time to do it.

But it’s somewhat troubling he had to do it after this game.

Eight of the 10 Pistons who played against Brooklyn project to make the regular-season rotation. Joel Anthony played over Aron Baynes, and once healthy, Blake could challenge Spencer Dinwiddie to become back up point guard – at least until Jennings is ready. Otherwise, Detroit – with Jackson, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, Marcus Morris, Ersan Ilyasova, Andre Drummond, Jodie Meeks, Stanley Johnson and Anthony Tolliver – looked similar to its opening-night lineup.

Van Gundy is blunt, but he doesn’t tell the media things he hasn’t already directly told his players. They appreciate that.

He’d appreciate them getting this message.

Report: Dwight Howard didn’t have offseason surgery

Dwight Howard
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Dwight Howard said he played with a torn MCL and meniscus in the Western Conference finals – pretty shocking news that few knew what to make of.

So, um, did he have offseason surgery?

Calvin Watkins of ESPN:

Howard obviously feels great about his health now, so maybe this was the right course.

We’ll never how Howard would have performed if fully healthy, but he averaged 14.4 points and 14.4 rebounds in 35.1 minutes per game against the Warriors during the conference finals. How bad could the injuries have been?