Golden State Warriors v Denver Nuggets - Game One

With David Lee out, Stephen Curry becomes even more important in Game 2


The playoffs are all about adjustments, but even though the Warriors find themselves down 1-0 to the Nuggets they really don’t have to change too much heading into this all important game two.

Missing David Lee certainly hurts. When looking at the match ups in this series, he was one player who clearly had an advantage for the Warriors. His ability to space the floor as a shooter, score from the low post, and act as a facilitator have been staples of the Warriors’ offense all season. Replacing those things won’t come easy and several players will need to find a way to chip in a bit extra to make it happen.

First on that list is Stephen Curry. His 7-20 shooting from game one simply wasn’t good enough, even though he did find a way to sort out some of his issues in the 2nd half. The Warriors need a more efficient scoring effort to go with the playmaking Curry flashed in game one. Getting him into spots on the floor where he can get better looks — be it through isolation or working off picks — should be a high priority for head coach Mark Jackson and I expect him to have some wrinkles in place to do just that.

Another player who needs to raise his game is Carl Landry. Landry will need to find a way to be effective from the post and as a mid-range threat, providing some of the balance Lee has offered the Warriors’ offense all season. Landry will never be the passer that Lee is, but if he can hit the open jumpers he’ll get out of the pick and roll while doing some damage from the low block in isolation, the Warriors will take it.

Landry’s bench mate, Jarrett Jack, will also need to be better than he was in game one. Jack was badly outplayed by Andre Miller and if the Warriors are to be competitive in this series they’ll need that match up to be much more even (or even won by Jack) in the coming games.

If the Warriors can get those contributions from those players and combine them with the solid defense they flashed in the first contest, they should be able play another close game. The, key, however is to not get overwhelmed early by a Nuggets team who surely gained some confidence after getting a win when they clearly weren’t at their best either.

This may prove difficult with Kenneth Faried likely returning, the Nuggets’ role players (at least ones not named Andre Miller) likely to shoot better than they did in game one, and the home crowd spurring them on. They’ll be energetic and will attack relentlessly. It’s what they always do.

But if the Warriors simply keep their heads about them, find a way to maximize Curry’s touches, and do as good a job of getting back in transition and they did in game one, they should be right there. Of course all those things are easier said than done, but that’s the task at hand.

They’re the underdogs for a reason, right?

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.