Miami Heat players LeBron James, Ray Allen and Dwyane Wade react in the closing seconds of their win over the Milwaukee Bucks in Miami

Heat open title defense with blowout Game 1 win over Bucks


The one-eight matchup between the Heat and the Bucks in the Eastern Conference playoffs seemed to be the biggest mismatch of them all, for a variety of reasons. Nothing took place during Miami’s 110-87 blowout victory on Sunday to change those perceptions.

Miami came into the postseason on an insane run, winning 37 of its final 39 regular season games. The Bucks, meanwhile, stumbled to the playoffs by dropping seven of their last nine.

Despite the lackluster pairing, or maybe because of it, Brandon Jennings tried to breathe some life into the series by going on record as saying the Bucks would take care of the Heat in six.

While that’s obviously not likely to happen, you can’t fault Jennings for the false bravado, and at least he backed up his words on the court, if only in the first half.

Jennings was fun to watch in the first two quarters, scoring 18 points (albeit on 14 shots) while temporarily keeping the game close. He scored on array of difficult shots, both inside and from three-point distance, and his Bucks were down by only seven points at the break after trailing by as many as 13 early.

Monta Ellis took on the scoring for Milwaukee in the third, getting going for 11 points in the period. The Bucks battled from 15 points down to close to within eight once again, but just like the Spurs did to the Lakers earlier on Sunday, Miami closed the quarter with a furious, momentum-seizing rally that all but sealed it.

It all started with LeBron James, who drove through traffic in the half court set to finish with a left-handed dunk at the rim that seemed to ignite his teammates. Chris Andersen got loose for dunks on consecutive possessions, and a free throw from James capped the 7-0 run that took just over two minutes of game time and had the Heat back up by 15 entering the fourth.

James finished with a near triple-double line of 27 points, 10 rebounds, and eight assists, but got his points on just 11 shots — and all but two of those came at the rim. Take a look at his shot chart:


That’s ridiculous. If James has the discipline to attack the rim in this way with these results, no one is stopping the Heat.

Jennings and Ellis finished with 26 and 22 points respectively, but no other Milwaukee player finished in double figures. The Bucks’ main rim protector, Larry Sanders, played only 18 minutes and was completely ineffective in stopping anything Miami wanted to do inside.

Look, there’s no getting around it: It’s going to be a short series for Milwaukee in the first round of the playoffs. The games will seem long due to the way Miami will do what they want when they want against the undermanned Bucks, but there will be short spurts of success in keeping the games close.

And really, that’s the best the Bucks can hope for under the circumstances.

Gordon Hayward goes behind Jordan Clarkson’s back with dribble

Gordon Hayward, Nick Young
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Utah’s Gordon Hayward abused the Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson on this play.

First, Hayward reads and steals Clarkson’s poor feed into the post intended for Kobe Bryant, then going up the sideline he takes his dribble behind Clarkson’s back to keep going. It all ends in a Rudy Gobert dunk.

Three quick takeaways here:

1) Gordon Hayward is a lot better than many fans realize. He can lead this team.

2) It’s still all about the development with Clarkson, and that’s going to mean some hard lessons.

3) Hayward may have the best hair in the NBA, even if it’s going a bit Macklemore.

(Hat tip reddit)

Could Tristan Thompson’s holdout last months? Windhorst says yes.

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five

VIZZINI: “So, it is down to you. And it is down to me.”
MAN IN BLACK nods and comes nearer…
MAN IN BLACK: “Perhaps an arrangement can be reached.”
VIZZINI: “There will be no arrangement…”
MAN IN BLACK: “But if there can be no arrangement, then we are at an impasse.”

That farcical scene from The Princess Bride pretty much sums up where we are with the Tristan Thompson holdout with the Cleveland Cavaliers, minus the Iocane powder. (Although that scene was a battle of wits in the movie and this process seems to lack much wit.) The Cavaliers have put a five-year, $80 million offer on the table. Thompson wants a max deal (or at least a more than has been offered), but he also doesn’t want to play for the qualifying offer and didn’t sign it. LeBron James just wants the two sides just to get it done.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN thinks LeBron could be very disappointed.

Windhorst was on the Zach Lowe podcast at Grantland (which you should be listening to anyway) and had this to say about the Thompson holdout:

“I actually believe it will probably go months. This will go well into the regular season.”

Windhorst compared it to a similar situation back in 2007 with Anderson Varejao, which eventually only broke because the then Charlotte Bobcats signed Varejao to an offer sheet. Thompson is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavaliers can match any offer, but only Portland and Philadelphia have the cap space right now to offer him a max contract. Neither team has shown any interest in doing so.

And so we wait. And we may be waiting a while.