Bulls put up a fight before Heat eventually cruise to victory

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Chicago’s performance in Miami on Sunday was yet another in a long series of them that makes you believe that no team would look forward to playing the Bulls in a seven-game series.

The Heat eventually cruised to a 105-93 victory, exacting some minor measure of revenge on the Bulls for beating Miami in Chicago back on March 27, which put an end to the Heat’s historic 27-game winning streak. But it wasn’t as easy as expected.

Miami had rested its stars off and on for the past week or so, but went with LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh in this one. The Heat wanted to make sure to get this win over the Bulls, while not having too much rest for any of its star players before they open the playoffs at home against the Bucks next weekend.

The Heat tried to put this one away early, and looked like they might do so after a big dunk from James down the middle of the lane pushed the Miami lead to 15 points with just over five minutes remaining in the first half.

But the trait of this Bulls team that makes them so tough is the way they keep playing at maximum intensity, no matter the score. It also doesn’t hurt to have someone like Nate Robinson coming off the bench, who can occasionally catch fire.

Robinson sparked a spirited comeback that helped the Bulls cut the lead to just two before halftime. He scored 10 points in the final 3:34 of the second quarter, and pushed the tempo to get his teammates easy and open looks in transition.

Miami had its lead back to double digits just over midway through the third, and it hovered there for essentially the rest of the game. You never got the feeling Chicago was going to be able to make enough of a run to close the gap in the second half, once the Heat clamped down and tightened their rotations defensively.

At the same time, it never felt like Miami would blow this one open, either.

James said before the game that he was looking forward to the physical play of the Bulls, but the referees didn’t share that same sentiment. There were 57 fouls called over the course of the game, distributed fairly evenly with the Bulls picking up 30 to the Heat’s 27. But Chicago got the short end of the whistles early, and had 14 personal fouls called on them in the game’s first 18 minutes.

Miami won as expected, and Chicago competed as expected. There wasn’t anything new to be learned from this contest so late in the season, but the Bulls did seem to confirm the fears of the rest of the teams in the Eastern Conference playoffs — that they’ll be an extremely tough out, no matter the matchup.

Can Stephen Curry shoot the ball into the sun roof of a car? Did you even need to ask?

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Stephen Curry has been getting up buckets the past week, working on his game. Sort of. It’s been a bit unconventional.

First, he finished off an alley-oop pass from Tony Romo on the American Century golf course in Lake Tahoe.

Then on Thursday he was filming an Infinity car commercial and had to shoot one into the sun roof from what looks to be 15-20 feet away. He drains it.

Of course he made that, he’s basically the Meadowlark Lemon of a new generation, but without the hook shot.

Celtics sign 2016 first-round pick Guerschon Yabusele

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When you think of the best-run organizations in the NBA — think Spurs or Warriors right now — they not only have elite players helping them win now, but also have a couple of roster spots for younger players they are trying to develop.

The Boston Celtics are trying to be that kind of franchise, and the signing Thursday of Guerschon Yabusele fits that trend.

Boston took Yabusele with the No. 16 pick in the 2016 draft, which means he is on the rookie scale and at least the first two years are guaranteed.

Yabusele is an explosive but very raw 6’8” power forward out of France who the Celtics had get a year of seasoning in the Chinese Basketball Association. He’s a project and may not be able to contribute this season to the Celtics, but he’s got the athletic potential to at least be a rotation player in the league. That the Celtics signed him means they must think that potential is real. He didn’t play at Summer League because he is coming off surgery to remove bone spurs from his foot.

Interestingly, with the Celtics’ signings of Shane Larkin and Daniel Theis in the last 24 hours, Boston now has 16 guaranteed contracts on the roster. They can only go into the season with 15 players on the roster (plus two two-way contracts, but we’re not talking about those deals). Someone is going to be cut and be paid not to play this year, or be traded.

One year after attempted murder charge dropped, Eric Grifin signs two-way deal with Jazz

AP Photo/Rick Bowmer
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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — One year after having an attempted-murder charge against him dropped, Eric Griffin signed a two-way contract with the Utah Jazz.

Griffin was a member of the Jazz during NBA summer leagues in Salt Lake City and Las Vegas. He averaged 10.8 points, 7.8 rebounds and 3.0 blocks in Vegas.

The 6-foot-8, 205-pound center/forward played for Hapoel Galil Gilboa in the Israeli Basketball Premier League last season, averaging 14.9 points and 7.1 rebounds.

This is the first time the Jazz have used the two-way contracts implemented by the NBA for the upcoming season.

Teams can sign two players to these deals in addition to the 15-man roster. The contracts allow NBA teams to better compensate Gatorade League players expected to spend time with the big league team. Griffin can spend up to 45 days in the NBA.

Warriors fans will need to buy “memberships” to then pay for season seats in new arena

Image courtesy Golden State Warriors
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Going to NBA games — particularly playoffs and NBA Finals games — at Oracle Arena in Oakland is a joy because it is loud and filled with exuberance and love of the sport. It feels more like a college atmosphere (with beer) than it does the more staid feel of many modern NBA arenas. I hope the Warriors don’t lose that when they move into their new arena in San Francisco in the fall of 2019.

What I do know: It’s going to cost some serious bank just to have the right to buy season seats in the new building.

The Warriors are making teams buy “memberships” for the right to buy season tickets — just don’t call them “personal seat licenses.” The San Francisco Chronicle has the details.

The team is calling it a “membership” program, and it will require season-ticket buyers to pay a one-time fee that will enable them to buy their seats for 30 years. In a unique twist yet to be used in any pro sport, the Warriors promise to pay back that fee after 30 years.

Golden State’s ticket plan represents the latest evolution of a business trend that has deep roots here in the Bay Area, where Al Davis and the Raiders were pioneers in selling “personal seat licenses,” and where both the Giants and the 49ers used similar strategies to help finance their new stadiums. The twist the Warriors are stressing is that, unlike PSLs, which required a one-time cost allowing a customer to buy season tickets every year, this plan involves a refund at the end.

How exactly does this work?

If you want to own Warriors season tickets, you would pay a one-time fee for the right to purchase your seats every year for the next 30 years. You can do that in one lump sum, or finance the payments. That’s a big commitment, but the team says memberships will be transferable and can be sold, but only through a marketplace run by the team.

How much are they? The Warriors say about half the memberships will be less than $15,000, the other half scale up from there.

In the Bay Area, there was zero chance the Warriors would be able to get public funding to help them build this new $1 billion arena (as it should be everywhere, but that’s another rant for another time). This is the Warriors’ way to essentially get an interest-free loan to help pay for part of that arena. This is not a plan that will work in every market, but with the money available in San Francisco they can pull it off.

This arena is going to generate a lot of new revenue for the team outside of just this membership fee, and those fattened revenue streams are something Warriors ownership is counting on to help them keep the best — and soon to be the most expensive — team in the NBA together.