Marty Blake

Marty Blake, “godfather” of NBA scouting, dies


In today’s world of the Internet and video, if a guy can play we find out about him no matter what small college he attended. But there was a time that if you were Karl Malone at Louisiana Tech or Scottie Pippen from Central Arkansas you could get missed.

But Marty Blake, the NBA’s long time director of scouting, found those guys and many others and made sure teams knew. He discovered a lot of national and international talent.

Blake passed away Sunday in Atlanta at the age of 86.

“Marty began his lifetime of service to basketball at a time when the league was still in its infancy,” said NBA Commissioner David Stern in a statement. “His work as a general manager and then as Director of Scouting for the NBA first helped the teams to understand the value of scouting. Marty’s dedication not just to the NBA but to basketball was extraordinary and we will forever be indebted to him.”

Blake was the general manager for the Milwaukee Hawks back in 1954 and followed that franchise to St. Louis then Atlanta. After leaving the role of GM he had a consulting service but was quickly snapped up as the league’s official director of scouting. In that role he started the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament and the NBA Pre-draft Combine, both key talent evaluation settings that still go on today.

In 2005 he was inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame. He retired a couple years ago.

Blake is survived by his wife of more than 50 years, Marcia Blake; his three adult children, Eliot Blake, Sarah Blake and Ryan Blake, and five grandchildren. Our thoughts are with his family and friends.

John Wall drops J.R. Smith with crossover, makes layup (VIDEO)

John Wall
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John Wall is one of the hardest players to guard in the NBA. J.R. Smith found that out the hard way on Tuesday night when Wall sent him flying with a behind-the-back dribble before making an easy layup.

The Wizards beat the Cavs, who are now 13-5 on the season.

Sixers to retire Moses Malone’s number next season

Darryl Dawkins, Moses Malone

Kobe Bryant‘s pregame tribute video stole the show in Philadelphia, but Tuesday night was Moses Malone tribute night. The former league MVP and Hall of Famer passed away in September, and his legacy was honored by the Sixers during a halftime ceremony. During the festivities, Malone’s son announced that his No. 2 will be retired by the organization next season.

There’s no question that Malone, one of the greatest players in the history of the sport, deserves to have his number retired. The only relevant question is: why didn’t this happen years ago? The ceremony next season should be good, but it would have been better if they had done it when Malone was alive to participate in it. No Sixers player has worn No. 2 since Malone anyway, but it’s been over 20 years since he last wore a Sixers jersey. Why couldn’t they have found some time in those two decades to have a ceremony and hang a banner?

LeBron James with two-handed halfcourt bounce pass for assist (VIDEO)

LeBron James
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Perhaps LeBron James‘ most underappreciated skill has been his passing. He is rightly hailed as the most unselfish superstar of his generation, but being a willing passer is only part of it: he’s also as good at it as any point guard in the league. Case in point: this two-handed halfcourt bounce pass on Tuesday night, finding Richard Jefferson for an easy dunk:

Kobe gets great introduction, loud ovation in Philadelphia

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Kobe Bryant‘s relationship with his hometown of Philadelphia had its rocky sections — the Kobe’s Lakers beat the Sixers in the 2001 Finals, and then Kobe was booed during the 2002 All-Star Game —  but all was forgiven on Tuesday night.

In his final trip to Philly, he was given a framed Lower Merion High School jersey — that’s Kobe’s school, in case you forgot — and it was presented by Dr. J.

Then the fans welcomed him like you see above.

That pumped up Kobe, who scored 13 first quarter points on 5-of-10 shooting, his best quarter of the season.