Erik Spoelstra, Chris Bosh, LeBron James, Mike Miller

With streak over, Heat can turn focus to bigger goal


It’s not a good thing for the Heat that the streak is over. That streak helped keep them focused through the dog days of the season and that will help them in the playoffs. Plus, setting a new record could have been a special part of their legacy when we look back on this team in a decade. You could tell how bad LeBron wanted that with how he played at the end of Wednesday’s loss — he showed a kind of passion we don’t often associate with LeBron.

But the end of the streak isn’t the worst thing, either.

While the streak is and will be part of the Heat’s legacy from this season and this era, it will be hollow without a ring at the end of it. The 1972 Lakers got their ring that season, the 72-win Chicago Bulls got their ring that season — regular season accomplishments become diminished in the public eye without a title to back them up.

Go ask the 2007 New England Patriots about it.

So the timing for the Heat isn’t all bad. First, as Gregg Popovich has said, teams tend to swoon a little after the end of a streak — it’s a natural response. Those ’72 Lakers lost four of six starting with the end of their streak. Better for the Heat to get that out of the way now.

And better to get some players some time off to rest and recover — all those close calls during the streak meant not only was the team’s core playing every game (almost) they were playing big, important minutes through the end of the game. There was no break.

Dwyane Wade clearly could use a little more time off. He looked a step or two slow against the Bulls. Chris Bosh has played in 68 games, Ray Allen and his old bones 69, and even LeBron is at 71. Granted, LeBron wants no part of a night off, but Spoelstra could force one or two on him, just to help rest all the bumps and bruises from the hard fouls LeBron has to suffer through.

Then there’s what to do about having the best overall record in the NBA. Although I don’t think that should be a big priority. In theory the Heat are in a battle for the best overall record — they are two games up on the Spurs for that as of Thursday — but in the finals the NBA switches to the 2-3-2 format of games and with three games in a row for the lower seed the home court advantage is somewhat nullified. It helps if you get to a Game 7, but it matters less in the finals than the earlier rounds, and the Heat have the top seed in the East locked up.

So the Heat need to move on, starting Friday in New Orleans. Get guys a little rest, work on a few bad habits they picked up during the streak, and focus on what really matters. Because for the Heat and their legacy, for LeBron’s legacy, it’s all about rings now.

Carmelo Anthony drops 21 on Wizards in preseason Friday

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We had an efficient Carmelo Anthony sighting in the preseason.

Anthony and the Knicks went up against the Wizards and ‘Melo hit 10-of-15 shots to score 21 points. He also had four rebounds and four assists.

Derrick Williams had 23 points on 11 shots to lead the Knicks in scoring, and New York won 115-104.

Lucky? Klay Thompson reminds Doc Rivers which team lost to Rockets


There’s this overplayed angle talked about by some fans and pundits suggesting the Warriors just got lucky last season — for example, they faced a banged-up Rockets’ team in the conference finals then a Cavaliers’ squad without two of their big three through the Finals. Then there was Clippers’ coach Doc Rivers saying the Warriors were lucky not having to play the Clippers or Spurs in the postseason.

The Warriors are sick of hearing they were lucky.

Friday Klay Thompson fired back at Rivers, via

– “I wanted to play the Clippers last year, but they couldn’t handle their business.”
– “If we got lucky, look at our record against them last year (Warriors 3-1). I’m pretty sure we smacked them.”
– “Didn’t they lose to the Rockets? Exactly. So haha. That just makes me laugh. That’s funny. Weren’t they up 3-1 too?”
– “Yeah, tell them I said that. That’s funny. That’s funny.”

Warriors big man Andrew Bogut phrased it differently.

If you think the Warriors just won because they were lucky — you are dead wrong.

They were the best team in the NBA last season, bar none. They won 67 regular season games in a tough conference, then beat everyone in their path to win a title. Did they catch some breaks along the way, particularly with health? You bet. Magic Johnson, Michael Jordan, and Kobe Bryant didn’t win a title without catching some breaks along the way, either. Nobody does. Luck plays a role, but it was not the primary factor in why the Warriors are champs.

All this talk of them getting lucky is fuel for the fire they needed not to be complacent this season. Way to give the defending champs bulletin board material, Doc.