Heat, Cavaliers enter Twilight Zone; Miami emerges with 24th straight win. Barely.

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Strangest. Game. Ever… or at least this season. Rod Serling should have done the play-by-play.

In the end, Miami escaped Cleveland with a 98-95 win that extends their winning streak to 24 games. That’s what the history books will show. But like life, this game was not about the results, it was about the journey.

And the journey was wild.

To start, the opening tip was delayed for nearly 45 minutes because the scoreboard was leaking coolant onto the court and had to be lowered to be fixed.

Then once the game did start the undermanned Cavaliers — no Kyrie Irving, no Dion Waiters, no Anderson Varejao — the Cavaliers not only hung in but also went on a 23-2 run to close out the half and lead by 21. The Cavaliers played harder and were more physical than a Heat team that was cold and seemingly disinterested. Tristan Thomas led the way 12 points and 5 rebounds in the first half (he finished with 18-8)

That Cleveland lead climbed all the way to 27 early in the third quarter, 67-40.

Then the Heat came back with a vengeance — a 43-12 run fueled by pressure defense threes (the Heat opened the second half hitting 8-14 threesm Mario Chalmers hit 4-of-5 from three on his way to 17 points for the game). Miami had come out trapping on defense and pressuring the ball, and over the course of the half the Cavaliers were starting their offense farther and farther away from the rim. Miami was playing like the team that won 23 in a row and it overwhelmed the Cavs.

Then a Cavs fan wearing “LeBron 2014 Come Back” T-Shirt rushes the court and is taken off by security. (If you’re trying to convince LeBron to return, being the crazy guy running on the court mid-game is not helping your cause. Just sayin’.)

After that Miami looks like they are going to run away with it and cruise to a win. The Heat lead gets up to 8… but then the Cavaliers answer with a 7-0 run of their own.

It was a one-point game with :44 seconds left. Both teams had a chance to win it (or ice the win) but both teams missed jump shots — Dwywane Wade with a 20-foot step back miss off a Chris Bosh pick, then a Wayne Ellington isolation missed three over Ray Allen (Ellington led the Cavs with 20 points). As the game got tight both teams played too much hero ball and only Alonzo Gee — who had some great baseline drives and dunks around LeBron on his way to 10 points — seemed to have any success that way.

In the end, LeBron hit a couple free throws to add to his triple-double — 25 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists. As it has been on this streak, he is the guy at the heart of it all.

“We had to dig deep for this one,” LeBron said in a televised post-game interview. “We already know, like I said this morning, every team is going to give us a good shot no matter their record, no matter who is on the floor, we are going to get their best. And we should enjoy that, we should embrace it because it picks up our level of intensity as well.”

There would have been something fitting about the Heat winning streak dying in Cleveland, something cathartic for Cavaliers fans. The reason it’s still alive is the maturity and additions to LeBron James’ games that he has added since leaving the Cavs. Which is a tough pill to swallow in Cleveland, despite playing the kind of game they can be proud of.

Hawks, coach Mike Budenholzer agree to part ways

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This was expected.

It was pretty obvious Mike Budenholzer didn’t want to stick around and lose a lot of games with the Atlanta Hawks as they rebuild the next few years, especially after he had been stripped of his GM powers. Budenholzer went well down the road with the Phoenix Suns about their open coaching position before thinking better of it. Since then he has set up a meeting with the Knicks about their coaching vacancy, a job he reportedly wants badly.

At this point there was no need for the Hawks and Budenholzer to continue their sham marriage, so they have agreed to amicably separate, a story broken by Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN and since confirmed by the Hawks.

Budenholzer said this to Wojnarowski of ESPN:

“I am grateful for the five years that I spent as coach of the Atlanta Hawks, and will always cherish the incredible contributions, commitment and accomplishments of the players that I was fortunate enough to work with here,” Budenholzer told ESPN on Wednesday night. “From ownership to management, support staff to the community, I’ll look back with great pride on what we were able to achieve together with the Hawks.”

For Budenholzer, the long-time Spurs assistant and a strong Xs and Os coach, look for him to both push for the Knicks job and be in the running if/when the Milwaukee Bucks job opens up whenever their season ends. In both cases he’s a fit — those are teams that need a culture and system reset, and Budenholzer proved he can bring that to Atlanta (that was a good team before they let Al Horford and Paul Millsap walk for nothing).

With Atlanta, they likely will turn to a top assistant coach who will get a chance to develop young players on that team (and not cost Atlanta as much as an established coach). Stephen Silas of the Hornets is a rumored name, but there are others.

LeBron James overrules controversial finish with game-winning 3-pointer (video)

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LeBron James‘ turnover with the game tied late looked like a bad call. LeBron’s block of Victor Oladipo on the ensuing possession looked like a goaltend.

Did the Cavaliers get robbed of a crucial possession? Did the Pacers get robbed of two go-ahead points?

LeBron nullified those questions with a buzzer-beating 3-pointer to give Cleveland a 98-95 win and a 3-2 series lead. The game-winner capped a great game by LeBron (44 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists) and moves the Cavs to the verge of advancing.

When a team with home-court advantage can close out a best-of-seven series with a road Game 6, it has 52% of the time. It has won the series 92% of the time.

The odds are even better with LeBron. LeBron has won 11 straight closeout games, nine of them on the road. He’ll have another opportunity Friday with Game 6 in Indiana.

Raptors’ ‘culture reset’ shines in Game 5 win over Wizards

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The Raptors promoted ball movement. They emphasized 3-point shooting. They empowered their reserves.

This was why.

Backups Delon Wright and C.J. Miles and starting center Jonas Valanciunas – who was benched in previous postseasons due to his old-fashioned style, but expanded his game beyond the arc this year – scored Toronto’s final 18 points in a 108-98 Game 5 win over the Wizards on Wednesday. Stars DeMar DeRozan (0-for-4 from the field) and Kyle Lowry (0-for-1 from the field, 0-for-2 on free throws) struggled down the stretch, as the Raptors burst open what had been a one-point lead.

Though DeRozan (32 points) and Lowry (17 points and 10 assists) were good overall, they succumbed late in previous playoff games. Toronto didn’t want that duo stuck with the burden of creating so much in a stagnate offense.

Hence, Masai Ujiri’s famous “culture reset.”

The results have been mixed so far against a tougher-than-average-eight-seed Washington. But at least the Raptors – up 3-2 entering Friday’s Game 6 in Washington – are on the verge of advancing.

When a team with home-court advantage can close out a best-of-seven series with a road Game 6, it has 52% of the time. It has won the series 92% of the time.

Raptors honor victims of van attack before Game 5 (photos)

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TORONTO (AP) — The Toronto Raptors honored the victims the deadly van attack Monday with a moment of silence Wednesday night before Game 5 of their playoff series against the Washington Wizards.

Players from both teams held up banners with the hashtag #TORONTOSTRONG as they stood on the court during the tribute and the national anthems that followed:

The Raptors, the Wizards and the NBA will make a donation to a fund for victims and those affected by the incident.

Raptors President Masai Ujiri spoke about the attack after the Raptors practiced Tuesday.

“What we do doesn’t really matter sometimes,” Ujiri said. “I can’t imagine what it would be like to be on that sidewalk.”

Guard Kyle Lowry said he was impressed by the actions of Const. Ken Lam, who earned international acclaim for peacefully arresting of suspect Alek Minassian.

“In America he would definitely have been shot up,” Lowry said. “He did an amazing job of making a judgment call. I think more people could learn from that.”

Coach Dwane Casey was struck by how close the carnage occurred to his own Toronto neighborhood,

“It’s not too far from up the street from where I live,” Casey said.

Casey and his coaches were in the midst of a meeting Monday afternoon when assistant Rex Kalamian’s phone buzzed with someone informing him of the tragedy. The coaches stopped their meeting and turned on a television to find out what had happened.

“It’s very unfortunate,” Casey said. “Just this weekend I was talking to people saying how safe Toronto is, how it’s a melting pot and you don’t have the same crime. Hopefully though, sport can offer a relief, some reprieve.”

Like Casey, Ujiri said he is proud of Toronto’s reputation as a safe, welcoming place.

“Everywhere I go, I brag about this city,” Ujiri said. “It’s the safest place in the world. It’s the best city in the world and it’s going to continue to be the best place and the best city in the world.”

Toronto police said the 10 people killed and 14 injured in the attack were “predominantly” women, but have declined so far to discuss a motive. The 25-year-old Minassian has been charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder and 13 counts of attempted murder.