Monday And-1 links: Should we be praising Brandon Knight for trying to make a play on DeAndre Jordan?

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Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• Brandon Knight became a trending joke on twitter after the Clippers DeAndre Jordan dunked all over him — R.I.P Knight. But Adrian Wojnarowski at Yahoo Sports says we got it backwards — most guys would have ducked out and not gotten in the poster at all, just let the dunk happen, but Knight made the effort and tried to make a play on it. Woj says he should be praised for that.

• Mike Prada at SBN counters that if Knight had made the right play at the right time he would have taken away the lob opportunity, not gotten dunked on.

• A good interview with John Wall where he says he thinks he deserves a max extension this summer. Among other things.

• Blake Griffin’s game has really grown in the last couple years. For example, he showed a handle Sunday night against the Pistons that only a handful of the game’s elite power forwards can match. He is a good passer and his midrange game is improving. But the Clippers are going to need a lot more from him if they are going to be contenders, our friend Rob Mahoney says at SI.

• Paul Pierce says what Celtics fans want to hear — if we get on a run in the playoffs anything can happen.

• That Pierce interview is part of the NBA’s always must-read column from David Aldridge, his Morning Tip at NBA.com. Also in there this week Aldridge said that quite, private negotiations to buyout Billy Hunter and get the lawsuits dropped and him out of the NBA players union are underway. This was always how this saga would end, the only question is the price.

• Also, if you want more details on what the NBA owners are looking at in the Seattle/Sacramento discussion, Aldridge has as level-headed and good an explanation as you are going to find.

• Another of Monday’s must read posts comes from Kevin Arnovitz at ESPN: How the Clippers are walking the line between elite contender and just very good. Even in the locker room Sunday they talked about using the blowout of the Pistons as a springboard to finishing with the level of play they will need in the postseason.

• Don’t look now, but Tyreke Evans is having a good season. Maybe his best season to date. So…. how much you going to offer him this summer as a restricted free agent?

• Two regulars to this award were named the NBA players of the week — the Heat’s Dwyane Wade for the Eastern Conference and the Lakers’ Kobe Bryant for the West. Wade averaged 25.3 points on .606 shooting, plus had 5.0 assists, 4.3 rebounds and 3.5 steals a game. Bryant averaged 33.0 points, 8.8 assists and 5.8 rebounds a game.

• Here’s a great piece describing why Delonte West is not playing in the NBA right now.

• Here is the argument that Kyrie Irving being out for up to a month is good for a Cavaliers team that should want more ping-pong balls in the lottery.

• Eric Maynor was traded to Portland but now says he wouldn’t mind sticking around.

• Andre Drummond is going to start doing some basketball related activities (as opposed to the pregame workout I watched him go through on Sunday, which involved a lot of running). However, the Pistons will not put a timeline on his return.

• Erik Spoelstra says we are all selling the Heat’s sacrifices short.

Draymond Green says Warriors are “more relaxed” this season

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Last year, the Warriors entered the NBA Finals with the weight of expectations: Defending NBA champions, 73 regular season wins, if they got the title they would leap up the ladder of all-time great teams, lose and it would be a massive let down. We all know what happened from there.

The Warriors are back in the Finals, taking on the Cavaliers for the third year in a row — but this year things are going to be different. Mostly because of Kevin Durant changing the equation. But also the Warriors mindset is better if you ask Draymond Green. Which Mark Spears of ESPN did.

This makes sense. The Warriors to a man denied the pressure and how physically/mentally taxed they were by the chase for 73, but it clearly wore on them physically and mentally. Green was thrashing about and drawing techs, over-reacting to everything (although sometimes that feels like his default setting). Curry was injured but also tired. The Warriors opened the door, LeBron James and the Cavaliers stormed through it.

Will a rested Warriors make a difference this time around? Maybe. But again, Durant matters more than rest.

Report: Harlem Globetrotters to resume series with Washington Generals

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The Harlem Globetrotters dropped the Washington Generals as an opponent a couple years ago – a sad development for basketball traditionalists.

But the sport’s most-lopsided rivalry is returning.

Darren Rovell of ESPN:

Sources said the Generals will be put into rotation to play the Globetrotters again as early as this summer and will take on a greater life than before as the lovable losers.

This just feels right. There’s a spirit about the Generals that complements the Globetrotters so well.

Report: Turkish government issues arrest warrant for Enes Kanter

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The current, authoritarian government in Turkey is not big on dissent (they have beaten protestors of the Turkish regime at a march in this country). Or human rights.

So what’s real trouble for them is opposition and dissent from a famous, well-known person.

Which brings us to Oklahoma City big man Enes Kanter. He is a native of Turkey, and he has been outspoken in his opposition to that country’s current president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. Last week the Turkish government revoked Kanter’s passport while he was traveling the globe promoting his charity. He barely got out of Indonesia and was able to get to Romania, where he was detained for a stretch before getting to return to the United States via London.

Now, the Turkish government has issued an arrest warrant for Kanter, reports the Agence France-Presse.

Turkey issued an arrest warrant on Friday for Turkish NBA star Enes Kanter, accusing him of being a member of a “terror group”, a pro-government newspaper reported.

A judge issued the arrest warrant after an Istanbul prosecutor opened an investigation into Kanter’s alleged “membership of an armed terrorist organisation”, Sabah daily reported.

He is in no danger of being extradited by the United States because of this. If anything, it strengthens his case for U.S. citizenship based on asylum.

Kanter is a supporter of the Gülen movement in that country, which is led by the exiled cleric Fethullah Gulen, who currently lives in Pennsylvania. That movement has opposed Erdogan (who recently won a disputed election in that country that gives him sweeping, almost dictatorial powers). Erdogan blamed Gulen for masterminding a failed 2016 coup attempt in Turkey, one with members of the military involved (after that attempt members of the Gulen movement have been swept up by the government all over Turkey). This has come at a cost for Kanter, who has been disavowed by his own family because of his political beliefs.

Kanter is not about to back down from his position. Which means it may be a long time before he gets to visit his homeland again.

Report: Duke guard Frank Jackson undergoes foot surgery before NBA draft

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Duke guard Frank Jackson declared for the 2017 NBA draft with an outside shot of going in the first round and a likelihood of getting picked in the second-round.

This won’t help his stock.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Duke’s Frank Jackson, a well-regarded point guard in the 2017 NBA draft class, underwent right foot surgery and is expected to be fully recovered sometime in July.

When Jackson recovers will determine whether he plays in summer league, and that can affect transition to the pros as a rookie.

The bigger questions: Will this hinder his athleticism long-term? Does this put him at greater injury risk?

Jackson, a 6-foot-4 scoring guard, relies on a strong first step to attack the basket and high elevation on his jumper.