Miami Heat's guard Dwyane Wade goes to the basket past Indiana Pacers guard George Hill during their NBA game in Miami

Baseline-to-Baseline recaps: Miami wants to know if you have any other challengers

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Welcome to PBT’s roundup of yesterday’s NBA games. Or, what you missed while wondering where you’re going to get your next lion meat burger if not Chicago….

Lakers 90, Bulls 81: The Lakers offense has been better of late and the Bulls offense continues to be unimpressive. At best. Those things combine to give the Lakers another win, one that moves them into the eighth playoff seed. Our Brett Pollakoff was there and broke it down.

Clippers 129, Pistons 97: The Clippers were looking to springboard their defense and overall game as they start to think about the playoffs. A good way to have your defense look good is to play a team that tries to make you pay for your mistakes with shots by Jason Maxiell and Jonas Jerebko. Easy win for the Clips. If you want to read more about their defense and this game, we can help you out.

Heat 105, Pacers 90: This is not a statement win for the Heat. It’s one of 18 straight statement games by the Heat to the entire league.

This game unfolded pretty much like you’d expect — the Pacers defense could keep them close for a stretch, but then they’d have an offensive lull, turn the ball over a few times and suddenly they are playing catch-up. And the Pacers are not a team that can play catch-up. Mario Chalmers led the Heat 26 points including knocking down five 3-pointers. Chris Bosh added with 24 points, Dwyane Wade chipped in 23 points and six steals. The Heat shot 56 percent for the game, showing they can score on the defense that statistically has been the best in the NBA this season.

Thunder 91, Celtics 79: Celtics fans have every right to dream of a huge playoff run, they got one last season. But this game was more like the reality of what the NBA elite look like against the Celtics. The Celtics and their defense — plus 20 points from Paul Pierce — hung close with the Thunder for three quarters.

But the Thunder cranked up the defensive pressure and opened the fourth quarter on an 11-0 run. The Celtics shot just 18.2 percent (4-for-22) for 14 points in the fourth quarter and OKC ran away. Kevin Durant had 23. The bottom line is the Thunder had another gear the Celtics did not.

Hornets 98, Trail Blazers 96: For the second time in a week the Hornets gave up a double-digit lead late, but this time the outcome was different. An and-1 lay-up and free throw by Ryan Anderson with 1.8 seconds to play (off a sweet drive and dish by Greivis Vasquez) gave the Hornets a win this time around. His shot was in answer to a Damian Lillard three with 11.2 seconds to play that put Trail Blazers on top. Lillard had eight of his 20 points in the fourth quarter, but Wesley Matthews was the real driving force in the Blazers comeback with 14 of his 24 in the fourth.

Anthony Davis looked good, with 18 points and 10 rebounds.

Bucks 115, Kings 113: Another game, another DeMarcus Cousins ejection — he got his fourth of the season for an elbow to the head of Mike Dunleavy. Who clearly got in Cousins head. Dunleavy had 16 points and knocked down four threes, by the way. The Bucks led from the second quarter on and withstood the Kings runs, including a late 11-2 one that made it very interesting at the end. The Kings could have used Cousins, who had 24 points and 10 boards before getting tossed (and you can expect a fine).

Monta Ellis had 29 points to lead the Bucks.

Orlando 99, Sixers 91: Well, the Sixers keep looking for a new bottom to the season. This might be it. This game was tied 85-85 and the Magic just flat-out outplayed the Sixers down the stretch, knocking down threes and pulling away. Late in the game the Magic went small, playing Beno Udrih, Jameer Nelson and Arron Afflalo together — and each hit a key three in the fourth. The Magic shot 5-of-8 from three in the final nine minutes to pull away. The Sixers never had an answer for the small ball lineup.

Thaddeus Young did his part for the Sixers — 26 points on 13-of-17 shooting — but Nelson outplayed Jrue Holiday at the point and that was key. Nelson had 24 points and 10 dimes.

Raptors 100, Cavaliers 96: The scariest scene in this game was Kyrie Irving leaving the game in the third quarter with a shoulder injury after a collision with a Raptor. The good news is X-Rays were negative but he will be re-evaluated Monday. The guy has had enough injuries this season, can’t the basketball gods lighten up on him a little?

The Raptors, without Rudy Gay (sore back) fought back from a 17-point first quarter deficit to make it a close game down the stretch. Cleveland led by a point in the final minute but Kyle Lowry scored the final four points to get Toronto the win, including a nice little turnaround jumper with 14 seconds left. Dion Waiters made it close with Irving out, scoring 13 of his 21 in the fourth.

Mavericks 100, Timberwolves 77: Dallas opened the second quarter on a 17-1 run and pulled away from there to an easy win. The Timberwolves looked tired — they played the night before in Denver and were delayed getting out of town because the plane had to be de-iced — and the Mavericks took advantage. Vince Carter had 22 points, Dirk Nowitzki added 16 points.

Pistons’ Stan Van Gundy “encouraged” by players speaking out, protesting social issues

CLEVELAND, OH - APRIL 17: Head coach Stan Van Gundy of the Detroit Pistons yells to his players during the first half of the NBA Eastern Conference quarterfinals against the Cleveland Cavaliers at Quicken Loans Arena on April 17, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)  *** Local Caption ***Stan Van Gundy
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Athletes are injecting themselves into the needed national conversation about race, violence, and policing in this nation. That has taken some very public forms, including LeBron James, Chris Paul, Dwyane Wade and Carmelo Anthony speaking at the ESPYs, and Colin Kaepernick taking a knee during the national anthem and leading others to do so. Some NBA players likely will follow Kaepernick’s lead.

Pistons coach/GM Stan Van Gundy likes seeing players speak out.

A couple of his Detroit players — Reggie Jackson and Marcus Morris — said they backed the 49ers quarterback. Here is what the never shy Van Gundy said about all of it, via Vincent Ellis of the Detroit Free Press.

“I’m encouraged by the fact of what some of those guys stood up and did at the ESPYs and had a conversation,” Van Gundy said. “I’m really proud of the fact that we have guys that not only see the problem, but want to try to do something about it…

“To me, in some ways, (police brutality is) just the most visible to focus on and it goes to deeper inequities in our criminal justice system, our education system so there’s so much to focus on,” Van Gundy said. “I think it’s great that we have players that want to be part of that conversation, and a lot of players that want to go beyond the conversation and be part of the solution.”

Van Gundy has been telling his players part of that solution is to vote.

The players union and NBA sent out a release saying they wanted to work together to create positive change, but details are still vague on what that might be. The only thing we know for sure as we head into the NBA season — with as divided a nation and election as anyone can remember as a backdrop — is that some NBA players are going to try and keep the conversation going.

Sunday is 16th anniversary of greatest dunk ever: Vince Carter over Frederic Weis

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It was the last game of the group stage of the 2000 Olympic basketball tournament at the Sydney Olympics, the USA was taking on France, another USA win on its way to another gold medal.

But what we all remember is this one play — Vince Carter dunking over the 7’2″ French center Frederic Weis.

Best. Dunk. Ever.

By anyone.

Weis was never the same.

In an impressive career — two-time All-NBA, eight-time All-Star, hours and hours of crazy highlights — this is always going to be the highlight at the top of the list. So we will use the anniversary of this dunk to look at it one more time.

Hat tip to nitramy at NBA Reddit.

Hornets coach Steve Clifford suggests allowing teams to advance ball in final two minutes without timeout

Steve Clifford
AP Photo/Chuck Burton
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The final minutes of a close NBA game rank among the best moments in sports – which is pretty remarkable, considering frequent stoppages interrupt and impede enjoyment of the game.

Clutch play. Timeout. Clutch play. Timeout. Clutch play. Timeout.

Coaches should probably call fewer timeouts, because drawing up a play also allows the defense to set. But timeouts give the offense the option of advancing the inbound spot into the frontcourt, a key advantage. So, teams will keep calling timeouts.

Unless…

Steve Aschburner of NBA.com:

For Charlotte’s Steve Clifford, the ability in the final two minutes of a game to advance the ball without requiring a timeout to be called could speed up the action. That has been used on a trial basis in the D League and in Summer League, and several coaches felt it worked well.

“The game is at an all-time high in popularity, but a lot of people complain about the last two minutes,” Clifford said. “I think it would add a different dimension but it would also be a good thing in addressing our biggest issue.”

Not that the coaches would be willing to lose any of their timeouts, though. They just wouldn’t save them specifically for that purpose.

I’m here for that.

I’m unsurprised control-seeking coaches want to keep all their timeouts, and reducing those seems unlikely, anyway. The NBA pays its bills through commercial breaks.

Would moving those advertising opportunities earlier in the game pay off? Audiences are probably larger in crunch time, but an action-packed closing stretch could hook fans and grow overall audiences. It’s always a difficult decision to forgo maximizing immediate revenue in pursuit of more later.

But I’m fairly certain fans would appreciate the change, which is at least a starting point in considering it.

Kyrie Irving feels validated after hitting game-winning shot to bring title to Cleveland

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Back in July during the pre-Olympics USA Camp in Las Vegas, I asked Kyrie Irving what had changed for him, what was different for him after winning an NBA title. His answer was about the doors it opened, the possibilities that suddenly felt available to him. A month after winning the title he still seemed a little overwhelmed by the experience, and he hadn’t fully processed it yet. Which is completely understandable.

Now, as training camp is set to open for the Cavaliers and their defense of that title, Irving clearly has gotten used to being a champion — and he feels validated. Look at what he told Joe Varden of the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

“Yes, my life’s changed drastically,” Irving told cleveland.com Saturday, during Irving’s friendship walk and basketball challenge downtown for Best Buddies, Ohio — an organization that gives social growth and employment opportunities to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

“It’s kind of, you’re waiting for that validation from everyone, I guess, to be considered one of the top players in the league at the highest stage,” Irving said. “That kind of changed. I was just trying to earn everyone’s respect as much as I could.”

It’s amazing to think of the impact one shot — Irving’s three over Stephen Curry with 53 seconds left in Game 7 — can have. If he misses, there is less pressure on the Warriors to answer with a three, maybe they come down and get a bucket inside for two (one could argue they should have done that anyway rather than hunt for the three), from there maybe the Warriors win. If so, that could change everything from Kevin Durant‘s summer plans to what the Cavaliers’ roster looks like today — there’s a good chance Cleveland’s lineup would have changed if they lost to the Warriors two Finals in a row.

One shot can have that kind of impact on a player, too.

Kyrie Irving was one of the top five point guards in the NBA for a while, a score first guy but one who had some floor general in him and got some steals. A lot of time seemed to be spent focusing on his flaws defensively and passing. But with that shot, he feels validated. If he carries that confidence into next season, the Cavaliers just got better.