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Metta World Peace says his style of play is aggressive, but not dirty


It can be extremely frustrating to watching Metta World Peace continually make violent plays that are meant to instigate or agitate his opponents, and then hear him try to explain away his actions afterward.

It’s not that World peace is lying or being disingenuous. He truly believes that plays he’s been penalized for — such as the subtle punch he gave to the Pistons’ Brandon Knight, and the elbow to the head of Kenneth Faroed that the league came down on him for a few days later — are well within the realm of reasonable in an NBA basketball game.

Obviously, they are not. But that didn’t stop World Peace from defending his style of play at the Lakers’ practice facility on Saturday during an interview session that lasted almost 20 minutes.

From Sam Amick of USA Today:

“It’s not like I (brought) this aggression to the league,” World Peace said. “I didn’t invent this. This is what we watched. This is what we saw. The Bill Laimbeers and the (Dennis) Rodmans. They played hard. And they wasn’t trying to hurt nobody. They just played hard. They played with passion. And we grew up wanting to play with passion. So when guys say we’re dirty, we’re just playing hard, man. We’re not playing dirty. We’re just playing, we’re reacting, we’re going hard. We want to win.”

Laimbeer arguably was just fine with hurting people as a member of the “Bad Boys” era Pistons teams that won back-to-back championships in 1989 and 1990, but we’re getting into semantics.

World Peace was responding to questions about that play in Denver, where Nuggets head coach George Karl later said that he felt it was premeditated. Whether it was or wasn’t, World Peace unquestionably has a long history of making excessively physical plays, and it’s going to continue to haunt him if he continues to make them, plain and simple.

Players’ union, NBA to set up cardiac screening for retired players

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First it was Darryl Dawkins. Then it was Moses Malone.

Two all-time great players who recently died — and at t0o young an age, 58 and 60 respectively — from undiagnosed heart conditions. Even before that, recognizing the issue the NBA players union and the league itself were setting up supplemental health coverage to provide cardiac screening for retired players, something ESPN’s Jackie MacMullan recently broke.

The joint effort between union executive director Michele Roberts and NBA commissioner Adam Silver — at a time when there still may be potentially acrimonious labor negotiations looming for their sides — is intended to ease the health concerns of its retired players.

Roberts said action from the players’ association on providing screening for its retired players is “imminent.”

“I wish I could give you an exact timetable, but we have to make sure all the components are in place,” Roberts told ESPN recently. “I will tell you we hope to have something sooner than later.”

The Cardiologists are affiliated with the NBA already, and some of the money will come from the league, while the union is both pitching in a chunk of cash and is the one organizing this, according to the report.

It’s good to Roberts and Silver working together on this. While you’d like to think this would be the kind of no-brainer move that the league and union would work together on, in the past the relationship didn’t always facilitate this sort of cooperation even on the obvious.

I’d like to think this bodes well for future labor talks, but I’m not willing to completely draw that parallel.


Stephen Curry drops 30 on Portland in preseason (VIDEO)

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Somebody is in midseason form.

Stephen Curry put up 30 on Portland in a preseason game Thursday night, hitting six threes and getting to the line 15 times over the course of his less than 26 minutes. It was quite a show.

Portland won the game 118-101 behind 25 points from Allen Crabbe and 22 from Damian Lillard. Not a lot of defense in this one but it was fun to watch.