Tom Thibodeau

Joakim Noah says Bulls coach Thibodeau ‘doesn’t understand the whole rest thing’


The questions about how hard Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau rides his starters have been asked countless times, and the answers are always the same: That’s how he chooses to do it, the players can handle it, and the results have been mostly successful.

That doesn’t mean that they’re going to stop, especially when the guys normally logging the heaviest of minutes end up doing so even when the game has seemingly already been decided, as was the case in an easy 96-85 win over the Nets on Saturday.

Chicago led by 18 points after three, yet Luol Deng played the entire fourth quarter giving him 44 minutes on the night, and Joakim Noah was subbed back in with just over six and a half minutes to play and the Bulls leading by 20.

It seemed excessive, more so than usual. And Noah had an opinion about it afterward.

From Sam Smith of

“I saw the way the game was going,” said Thibodeau. “You’re jogging back. They’ve got a lot of three point shooting on the floor. A 10-point lead can dissipate in a minute. You knock down three threes, you get a foul, boom. And then we were in the penalty; we’re recklessly fouling. We’ve got to do better.”

“What do you want me to say? Yeah, I’m tired, pretty tired,” Noah offered with a shrug. “Working on (his plantar fasciitis) every day, massages, lots of treatments, doing everything possible to keep it under control. It’s not really right after the game (you feel tired). It’s the next morning that’s the roughest.

“We’ve got a great coach,” Noah said as he began to smile and let out a laugh and you know one of those subtle, understated zingers was coming. “But he doesn’t understand the whole rest thing yet I don’t think. But it’s all good. We all want to win. It’s good.”

The thing about the Bulls is that while most teams are able to turn it up a notch once the postseason begins, Chicago is already playing at maximum effort, and playing its players maximum minutes — even in a situation like this where it would seem to be a good time for Thibodeau to get his guys some rest.

Thibodeau isn’t going to change his style, though, and the way he obsesses about the little things, even when up 20 with only six minutes remaining, is what has made him a successful head coach.

Having his two All-Stars log 40-plus minutes in a game that has already been decided, however, is eventually going to take its toll — perhaps as soon as Sunday night, when the Bulls head to Indiana to take on the Pacers.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.