Golden State Warriors' Thompson moves with the basketball while Indiana Pacers' George defends him during an NBA basketball game in Indianapolis

Klay Thompson’s dad will cut his allowance after league fine. I’m not kidding.


Klay Thompson is 23, a part of the young core of the Golden State Warriors, a guy who already is considered one of the league’s better shooters. He’s still on his rookie deal, so he’s “only” going to make $2.2 million this season, and not much more next season.

He’s going to make a little less this week — the league fined Thompson $35,000 for his involvement in the dust up with the Pacers this week.

But Klay won’t notice because doesn’t get his bi-weekly checks from the Warriors anyway — they go to his father, Mychal, who gives him a weekly allowance. Seriously. And is dad is going to cut his allowance after that fine. Just for the record again, Klay is 23.

Mychal — the former No. 1 overall pick and part of the Showtime Lakers who is now a Lakers radio broadcaster — has said on the air in Los Angeles more than once that he gets Klay’s checks and puts them in the bank then gives his son a $300 a week in spending money. The elder Thompson takes care of all the bills. had excerpts of a recent Mychal radio broadcast talking about his son’s finances.

“He will [figure it out] when he sees that cash envelope show up a little short this week,” said Mychal, a two-time NBA champion in his own right.

Mychal, while watching the ruckus unfold, was hoping Klay wouldn’t lose his temper and get involved.

“Then Roy Hibbert turned his back & [Klay] was like ‘now’s my chance’!” Mychal said. “I was like ‘you idiot’!”

On some level, I wish more parents would do this for their NBA player sons — or could be trusted to do it without blowing the money. Far too many NBA players start living like they’re Jay-Z once the game checks start rolling in, living basically paycheck-to-paycheck. The average NBA player is in the league less than five years, those checks dry up and then there is nothing left. It would be great if someone helped more of those young players build for their futures (some do, it should be noted).

But Klay Thompson has not only his rookie deal but also a couple nice contracts coming after that — if you can shoot the rock you can play in the league a long time. Klay is averaging 16.2 points per game this season (better than his father’s career average of 13.7) and is shooting 38.1 percent from three (but just 41.4 percent overall). At some point, once there is a nice next egg built up, Klay should take charge of his own finances. Just an idea.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.