Doug Collins rant had him going viral. He’s not really sure what that means.

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Tuesday night after an embarrassingly bad performance by the Sixers, old-school coach Doug Collins went off in an 11-minute press conference talking about effort. About being a professional. About leaving everything you’ve got on the court.

“I looked out there to start the game and three guys weren’t even sweating when we started the game. They’re going to ease themselves into the game. You’ve gotta get sweaty, you’ve gotta get ready to go.”

We talked about it and the clip was all over the Web. Thanks to the NBA’s very strong twitterverse Doug Collins was trending and the video went viral.

That confused him, reports Dei Lynam at CSNPhilly.com.

“I guess I was trending. I was viral and trending,” Collins joked. “What is all this stuff?

“It was interesting. I went back and I didn’t think I was hard. I thought I was talking about what I expected and as a coach that is what you do. There was nobody called out. I have never been a guy that if you lost a game but competed to your best, I was never disappointed. I have always been disappointed if we didn’t do everything we are capable of to win.”

“I was trying to get the spin on this. How was it spun that I was so hard. I don’t think I did that at all. I think the players know that. We are a big honesty group and I think our guys know when you put a Sixers uniform on what is expected, but I was shocked. My phone was blowing up on me. I didn’t realize I had been so tough.”

Collins didn’t call out names but he didn’t really have to because nobody in a Sixers uniform should have been safe.

But he also went on to say that he understands part of what has happened in Philly — a team that has lost seven in a row and dropped six games out of the playoffs — has to do with making a big trade and building a team around Andrew Bynum only to have injuries keep him out an entire season so far. Again from CSNPhilly.com.

“I think sometimes we don’t understand how that really affects guys,” Collins said. “Like the other night before we played Orlando, Andrew was getting ready to speak to the media and I said, ‘I don’t know if he is speaking or not.’ Players were getting ready for the game and the media was waiting in there for Andrew to speak. I don’t know how guys process that.

“I talked a little about it today because I didn’t read it, but someone said (Bulls head coach Tom) Thibodeau was talking about managing distractions. There are so many distractions for these young players today. They have so much on their plate and to keep focused on the task at hand.”

Collins is the kind of old-school, hard-nosed coach that can wear on a team, particularly a young one that is not winning. But the lessons he tries to impart about effort and professionalism do matter if guys want to stick, want to succeed.

It’s just hard because the Bynum injury dealt Collins and the Sixers a bad hand to play. At some point the reality of the talent situation was going to catch up with them, and it’s hard not to be frustrated with the reality of that.

NBA implementing ‘Zaza Pachulia,’ ‘James Harden’ rules

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NEW YORK (AP) — NBA referees will be able to call flagrant or technical fouls on defenders who dangerously close on jump shooters without allowing them space to land, as Zaza Pachulia did on the play that injured Spurs star Kawhi Leonard in last season’s playoffs.

Officials will also make sure jump shooters are in their upward shooting motion when determining if a perimeter foul is worthy of free throws, which could cut down on James Harden‘s attempts after he swings his arms into contact.

Leonard sprained his ankle when Pachulia slid his foot under Leonard’s in Game 1 of Golden State’s victory in the Western Conference finals. After calling a foul, officials will now be able to look at replay to determine if the defender recklessly positioned his foot in an unnatural way, which could trigger an upgrade to a flagrant, or a technical if there was no contact but an apparent attempt to injure.

“It’s 100 percent for the safety of the players,” NBA senior vice president of replay and referee operations Joe Borgia said Thursday.

The NBA had made the freedom to land a point of emphasis for officials a few years ago, because of the risk of injuries. But the play got renewed attention during the playoffs because of Leonard’s injury, and also one in which Washington forward Markieff Morris landed on Al Horford‘s foot in Game 1 of their Eastern Conference semifinal, knocking him out of a game the Celtics rallied to win.

Officials can still rule the play a common foul if they did not see a dangerous or unnatural attempt by the defender upon review. Borgia said Pachulia’s foul would have been deemed a flagrant.

With the fouls on the perimeter shots – often coming when the offensive player has come off a screen and quickly attempts to launch a shot as his defender tries to catch up – officials will focus on the sequencing of the play. The player with the ball must already be in his shooting motion when contact is made, rather than gathering the ball to shoot such as on a drive to the basket.

“We saw it as a major trend in the NBA so we had to almost back up and say, `Well, wait a minute, this is going to be a trend, so let’s catch up to it,”‘ NBA president of league operations Byron Spruell said.

Report: Cavaliers signing Kendrick Perkins

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Kendrick Perkins spent fewer than four months with the Cavaliers, including the 2015 playoffs. But nearly a year later after Cleveland let Perkins walk in free agency, LeBron James was still bemoaning Perkins’ absence.

Are the Cavs righting a wrong?

Joe Vardon of Cleveland.com:

Kendrick Perkins joined the Cavaliers at LeBron James’ minicamp in Santa Barbara, Calif., and will come to training camp next week, sources told cleveland.com.

The Cavs now have 18 players with standard contracts, and 15 – the regular-season limit – have guaranteed salaries. I doubt Cleveland wants to waive the two without guaranteed salaries, Kay Felder and Edy Tavares, either.

In other words, Perkins is a longshot to stick into the regular season.

Perkins was washed up when with the Cavaliers two years ago. The 32-year-old who sat out last season hasn’t produced on the court in several years. He’s tough and well-liked in the locker room, which might give him a chance of sneaking onto the regular-season roster.

But the Cavs should focus on developing toughness and chemistry among their rotation players. Perkins is just a crutch, most likely one who’ll be yanked away by cut-down day a few weeks from now.

Report: Lakers sell jersey ad for $36M-$42M over three years

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The Lakers are a financial behemoth, though that’s tied to a local-TV deal signed when they were still good.

How do current conditions value their brand?

John Lombardo and Terry Lefton of SportsBusiness Daily

The Lakers have signed a jersey patch deal with S.F.-based e-commerce company Wish. The three-year agreement, according to a source, is between $12-14M annually

That’s the second-richest known jersey-ad deal – behind only the Warriors ($20 million annually) and ahead of the Cavaliers ($10 million annually).

It clearly pays to be Los Angeles, though don’t discount the role of the Lakers’ fantastic history and intriguing future.

Rumor: Carmelo Anthony to accept trade to Trail Blazers if Knicks and Rockets don’t strike deal

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Carmelo Anthony trade talks between the Knicks and Rockets appear to be going nowhere.

Yet, Anthony’s camp is reportedly cautiously optimistic he’ll get dealt by Monday.

This might explain why.

Jason McIntyre of Fox Sports:

Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum have recruited Anthony to Portland. The Trail Blazers have plenty of expendable players who could be aggregated to matching Anthony’s salary – Evan Turner, Maurice Harkless, Meyers Leonard, Al-Farouq Aminu and Ed Davis – plus lower-paid players to give New York value. This certainly looks plausible.

It’d make sense for Anthony to hold out as long as possible for Houston, his ideal destination. He can use his no-trade clause to force the Knicks to deal with only the Rockets.

But what if that fails?

I’m skeptical New York, Portland and Anthony all agree to a deal. There are just too many sides to please.

The Knicks will need more than just bad contracts to move Anthony, and the Trail Blazers don’t need more scoring enough to relinquish significant assets. Anthony would also have to approve, and as miserable as the Knicks have been, the New York market still matters.

Again, this is plausible, but I’m doubtful. Either way, we should know soon with training camp around the corner.