Atlanta Hawks v Chicago Bulls

Report: Hawks pulled out of trade at the last minute that would have sent Josh Smith to the Bucks


As it turned out, the biggest name to be dealt before Thursday’s trade deadline passed was Rudy Gay, whom the Grizzlies sent to Toronto in a deal that was completed three weeks ago.

It was supposed to be Josh Smith.

Leading up to the 12 p.m. ET deadline, all signs pointed to Smith being the highest-profile player to be traded, with Atlanta rumored to be knee-deep in talks with Brooklyn, Phoenix, and Milwaukee to try to get something done before losing Smith this summer when he enters unrestricted free agency.

The Hawks ultimately decided that they weren’t being offered enough in return for Smith’s services, and will play out the season with him on their roster. But a deal was apparently in place to send Smith to the Bucks, before Atlanta called it off at the last minute.

From Ric Bucher of CSNBayArea:

Source: Atlanta Hawks blow up deal at last minute that would’ve sent Josh Smith to Milwaukee.

Hawks would’ve received Ekpe Udoh, Luc Mbah-Moute, Beno Udrih and a protected No. 1 pick. Can’t imagine the Bucks are happy having invested so much time in trying to make it happen. Leaves big question now if Hawks can do better this summer.

It’s tough to blame Atlanta for backing out of this one. Despite the issues the team has with not wanting to sign Smith to a max contract this summer, this offer consisted of a bunch of questionable spare parts that don’t immediately make sense, or help the Hawks to build a winner for the future.

As for the part about whether the Hawks can get anything better for Smith after the season, this latest report of Smith’s intentions isn’t likely to help in that regard.

From Jeff Zillgitt of USA Today:

On Thursday, Smith said Atlanta will be on his list of teams he considers when he becomes a free agent. However, all politics is local. The Atlanta native does not want to irritate the home fans, but a person familiar with Smith’s plans told USA TODAY Sports that it is “highly unlikely” that Smith re-signs with Atlanta. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the private nature of the negotiations.

If teams do their due diligence and discover that Smith indeed won’t return to Atlanta, then there’s no reason to overbid for his services to the point where they’d need to acquire him via a sign-and-trade, and give up assets in the process.

It’s worth noting that only teams who are under the luxury tax threshold (or no more than $4 million over it — it’s complicated) will be allowed to execute sign-and-trade deals next year under the terms of the new collective bargaining agreement, so Smith may have to settle for less money over the life of a new contract to play somewhere else.

Either way, it doesn’t seem like the Hawks will be able to do better than the questionable pile of players the Bucks were offering shortly before the deadline, but perhaps they’d simply rather have the cap space to pursue a different high-priced free agent instead.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.