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Gary Payton, two-thirds of Run TMC lead Hall of Fame finalists

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It’s time for The Glove to be in the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame.

Gary Payton — one of the greatest point guards of his generation, a defensive force, a nine-time All-Star and the face of Seattle Sonics basketball (with all due respect to Jack Sikma) — is the leader of the finalists for the Hall of Fame class of 2013.

Payton told ProBasketballTalk that this was not something he expected growing up in Oakland.

“It’s showing a lot of people have respected the things I’ve done in basketball and it’s showing I’ve done a lot in basketball,” Payton said. “And I’m really happy for it. Not a lot of people can get in the Hall of Fame, it’s a great honor. I hope that I can make it.”

The rest of the finalists include two-thirds of the Warriors Run TMC from the 1990s (and the other guy is already in) plus a Knicks legend who deserves it. There is another round of voting to pare this group down, with the class of 2013 to be announced Final Four weekend in April. The enshrinement happens in September.

In addition to Payton the finalists are:

• Bernard King. The Knicks swingman was one of the greatest pure scorers of all time. He averaged 22.5 points per game during a 15-year career and had some monster playoff runs, like 1984 when he averaged 34.8 points per game. More than that or the four All-Star games or two All-NBA First Teams, it was his influence on a lot of players coming up that matters. Seriously, this guy needs to be in. That he’s not is just wrong.

• Mitch Richmond. He was one third of Golden State’s Run TMC with Chris Mullen (already in the Hall) and fellow nominee Tim Hardaway. Richmond could score averaging 21 points a game for his career, was a six-time All-Star and has a gold medal.

• Tim Hardaway. The standard against which all other crossovers are judged. He won a gold medal and was a five-time All-Star as part of Run TMC in the Bay Area.

• Maurice Cheeks. The great Philadelphia Sixers guard (and current Oklahoma City Thunder assistant) is a four time NBA All-Star, was named to the NBA All-Defensive team four times, and won an NBA ring.

• Spencer Haywood. One of the more graceful big men of all time, he is a four-time All star, plus has both an NBA championship ring and a gold medal.

• Others on the list of finalists include college coaches Jerry Tarkanian, Guy Lewis (University of Houston and Phi Slamma Jamma) and Rick Pitino (don’t tell Celtics fans he was an NBA coach, they’ll deny it). Also Celtics coach Tom Heinsohn, already in as a player, is nominated as a coach because he won two titles as the head man for the Celtics.

The two women nominated are Dawn Staley (three time Gold Medalist and five time WNBA All Star) and Sylvia Hatchell (North Carolina women’s coach).

Also voted in for sure are Roger Brown (a four time ABA All-Star), Richie Guerin (the feisty six-time All-Star guard for the Knicks), Brazilian legend Oscar Schmidt (he should have been in already), Russ Granik (David Stern’s former right hand man), and George Raveling for a lifetime achievement award.

PBT Extra: Who do you want to see most in first All-Star Game?

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Tonight the NBA All-Star Game starters will be announced. Then the coaches have a week to vote and the rest of the roster will be put together by them.

This year should see a few first-time All-Stars, guys bursting on the scene and grabbing fans attention — so we asked people on Twitter who they most wanted to see in his first All-Star Game and I break it down in this PBT Extra.

The winner? Giannis Antetokounmpo with 45 percent of the vote. Which shouldn’t be a surprise, he’s second in the fan voting for the frontcourt in the East (behind only LeBron James). Good news for those fans, the Greek Freak is almost guaranteed to be a starter, he’s getting plenty of media votes and likely a lot from the players as well.

Second place in the poll? Joel Embiid of the Sixers. I’d love to see him, but will players and media members vote in a guy on a minutes restriction? Will the coaches pick him for that same reason? He is on the bubble.

Russell Westbrook: ‘Don’t say what’s up to that b— a—’ (video)

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Did Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant talk during the Warriors’ win over the Thunder last night? Westbrook said no, though video and first-hand accounts indicate otherwise.

Even more clearly: Westbrook – who walked near teammates Enes Kanter, Anthony Morrow and Jerami Grant – didn’t want someone talking to someone as they left the floor after the game. ESPN caught Westbrook saying, “Don’t say what’s up to that b— a—.”

You will never convince anyone Westbrook is referring to anyone but Durant.

Russell Westbrook commits epic travel (video)

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Between getting laid out by Zaza Pachulia and apparently talking with Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook committed a travel for the ages.

The Thunder guard took an inbound pass against the Warriors and just started walking up court without dribbling. The violation was so blatant, NBA officials even called the travel.

And it’s not as if they’re inclined to blow a whistle in that situation. Before Westbrook, Kemba Walker set a high bar last season, but he got away with this walk:

Are Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant on speaking terms after apparent conversation? Westbrook: ‘Nah’ (video)

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Russell Westbrook deleted Kevin Durant‘s goodbye text and, months later, told the whole world they still hadn’t talked.

That apparently changed during the Warriors’ win over the Thunder yesterday – though not if you ask Westbrook.

Westbrook dunked in the third quarter, and according to ESPN commentator Mark Jackson, Westbrook told Durant, “Don’t jump.” Anthony Slater of The Mercury News also wrote of the same quote.

ESPN’s telecast caught Durant clearly speaking to Westbrook shortly after. It appears Westbrook is talking back, but his back is to the camera.

After the game, Westbrook denied the exchange:

 

  • Reporter: “Are you and KD on speaking terms?”
  • Westbrook: “Nah.”
  • Reporter: “You guys had a little exchange in the third quarter.”
  • Westbrook: “What exchange?”
  • Reporter: “You and KD said something to each other.”
  • Westbrook: “Oh. You gotta maybe sit closer to the game. You maybe didn’t see clearly.”

This is so Westbrook – stubborn to the point of denying reality.

That approach worked for him when everyone rightly told him he was a significantly lesser player than Durant. Westbrook ignored that fact until it became false.

I suspect he wants to forget this exchange so he can maintain a cold animosity toward someone he prefers to resent.