Miami Heat's James drives in the first half of their NBA basketball game against the Portland Trail Blazers in Miami

Dominant LeBron helps Heat cruise to win over Thunder

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The Heat had little trouble taking care of the Thunder in Oklahoma City on Thursday, getting out to a big lead early and cruising to a 110-100 win behind yet another dominant performance from LeBron James.

When things did begin to tighten just a bit in the fourth quarter, James made certain to hit big shot after big shot down the stretch, ensuring that the Thunder never got close enough to truly threaten the game’s ultimate result.

Miami led by 15 after one, 17 at halftime, and 19 at the end of the third quarter. The Heat jumped on OKC early, and were aided by a slow start from Kevin Durant, who missed his first seven shot attempts. By the time he really got going and scored 22 in the fourth on the way to a game-high 40, the deficit was too much to overcome.

Durant took a nasty fall in the first half, but remained in the game and seemed unaffected by it as things progressed. His huge fourth quarter was only overshadowed by James either making the shot to end the Thunder run time and again, or running the offense to perfection and setting his teammates up to do the damage instead.

Miami made only eight of its 22 attempts from the field in the fourth, but at least five of them were demoralizing buckets that were made with impeccable timing to momentarily slow a surge from OKC. Three of those came from James, including a couple of difficult buckets as the shot clock was winding down, and an alley-oop right at the rim off of an out of bounds play from under the basket.

Russell Westbrook finished with 26 points, but did most of his damage in the first half while Durant was still finding his way. He was just 2-8 from the field for six points over the final two periods, while playing just about the entire second half.

No other Thunder player finished in double figures, which may be the team’s downfall at some point in the postseason if it can’t find other players to consistently produce offensively.

This game was more about where these two teams are at this point in the season, though, than it was about making any kind of lasting statement.

The Thunder have been up and down lately, and have a record of just 7-6 in the team’s last 13 games. Miami, meanwhile, enters the All-Star break riding a seven-game winning streak, highlighted by a dominant stretch of performances from James.

Speaking of streaks, LeBron’s historical one that had him string together six straight games with 30 or more points while shooting at least 60 percent from the field ended in this one, though it very easily could have continued. James was true to his word, and played the game without worrying about his individual statistics, shooting tough shots that were heavily contested, as well as jumpers from distance — including a long three-pointer with just over a minute remaining and his team leading by 10 — that really weren’t necessary.

The Thunder will tell you they played awful for most of the night, and still closed the gap to a manageable deficit, only to have the best player in the game make tough shots to keep them at bay. And that’s true to a certain extent; maybe things would have been different had OKC not fallen behind by so many points so quickly.

The Heat, however, know that they’re playing the league’s best basketball right now. When they are engaged defensively from the opening tip as they were on Thursday, and with James continuing to dominate the way he has over the past seven games, they’re virtually unstoppable.

Chauncey Billups explains why not every player wants to go home

Dallas Mavericks v Denver Nuggets
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LeBron James did it and shook up the NBA — he returned home to Cleveland. That has led to fantasies other players want to do the same thing: Kevin Durant back to Washington D.C.; DeMar DeRozan or Russell Westbrook back to Los Angeles; Blake Griffin back to Oklahoma. And the list goes on.

Not every player wants to do it.

Chauncey Billups did. Billups is a Denver guy who returned to play for the Nuggets — and gets his number retired Wednesday night, a much-deserved honor — but in a letter to his young self at the Players’ Tribune Wednesday he explained that going home is fraught with peril.

“But in reality, playing at home as a 23-year-old professional is going to be less blessing and more curse. (There’s perception, again, for you.) It’s as simple as this: you’re just not going to be ready for Denver to be Your City. You’re going to think you’re ready — and they are too — but, trust me, you won’t be. You’re still going to be so young. You’re still going to be hanging out with your boys, doing your old thing. There are going to be those … hometown distractions. And those distractions will add up.”

“And you have to understand, Chaunce: It’s not just that you made it. It’s that your whole neighborhoodis going to feel like they made it. All of Park Hill is going to feel like they made it. And don’t get me wrong — that’s special. But at the wrong age, it can also be tough. It can be a lot to handle. And you’re going to be at that wrong age. You’re not going to be mature enough yet, or developed enough yet, to take on that mix of environments, those responsibilities, that role.

“You’re not going to be ready to lead.”

There are plenty of guys around the NBA who understand those distractions and how those can get in the way of off-season workouts, of time spent shoring up a weakness or developing a new shot, and how during the season they can be another thing that wears the body down.

Some guys can handle it. Some can’t.

Go read the entire letter from Billups. He talks about getting traded from the Celtics his rookie season, about playing for Mike D’Antoni, about how very rarely do veterans want to mentor younger players because they are fighting for the same piece of the pie.  Billups is honest.

And it’s great that Denver is rewarding him as they should.

Did Marcus Thornton steal free throws from Rockets teammate Clint Capela?

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Leandro Barbosa – guarding Marcus Thornton and fighting through a Clint Capela screen – was called for a foul in the first quarter of last night’s Warriors-Rockets game.

Thornton went to the line.

Should he have? Or should Capela have?

Perhaps, Thornton and Barbosa tangled, but it certainly appeared the contact primarily occurred between Barbosa and Capela. It looks like Barbosa tries to ram through Capela.

It also appears Capela thought he drew the foul. Watch him step toward the line before seeing Thornton there and taking his spot along the paint.

So, why would Thornton step in? He’s making 89% of his free throws to Capela’s 40%.

I’m honestly surprised players don’t try this maneuver more often. Refs have so much to keep track of. The worst consequence would be the refs shooing away Thornton and bringing Capela to the line.

Thornton made both free throws, but it didn’t matter. Houston was playing Golden State, which rolled to a victory.

Kanye West apologizes to Michael Jordan

performs at the 2015 iHeartRadio Music Festival at MGM Grand Garden Arena on September 18, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images for iHeartMedia
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Kanye West – when he isn’t tweeting to invalidate the claims of dozens of women on nothing more than his own suppositions – is tweeting to Michael Jordan

Mark Parker is CEO of Nike, a company that collaborated with West on the Air Yeezy before an unhappy West bolted for Adidas. Jordan, of course, is a Nike ally and known for the Jumpman logo on his brand.

That’s why Kanye rapped in “Facts:”

Yeezy, Yeezy, Yeezy just jumped over Jumpman

Yeezy, Yeezy, Yeezy just jumped over Jumpman

We bring you the important news.

(hat tip: Jovan Buha of Fox Sports)

Report: Kobe Bryant once wanted Lakers to trade him to defending champs or 60-win team

LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 29:  Kobe Bryant #24 of the Los Angeles Lakers drives to the basket past Tim Duncan #21 of the San Antonio Spurs in Game Five of the Western Conference Finals during the 2008 NBA Playoffs on May 29, 2008 at Staples Center in Los Angeles, California.  The Lakers won 100-92.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
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Kevin Durant has taken plenty of criticism for his reported interest in signing with the Warriors.

Don’t chase a ring by just bolting for the best team. Build up your own team. Kobe Bryant would never do that.

Well…

Kobe Bryant requested a trade from the Lakers in 2007 – when the Cavaliers tried trading everyone but LeBron James for him – and the Bulls were Kobe’s top choice. Kobe had a no-trade clause, so he had some power to choose his next team. The rest of his list?

Kobe, via Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

It was Chicago, San Antonio (or) Phoenix.

The Spurs were reigning NBA champions, and the Suns were coming off a 61-win season. These teams were the class of the league.

They also had strong offensive identities – Gregg Popovich’s ball-movement-happy system in San Antonio and Mike D’Antoni’s up-tempo attack in Phoenix. How would Kobe have fit? Now, that’s a great what-if – especially because both teams had the assets to create intriguing trade packages.

The Spurs could’ve built an offer around Tony Parker and/or Manu Ginobili, the Suns around Shawn Marion and/or Amar’e Stoudemire. Could you imagine Kobe and Tim Duncan or Kobe and Steve Nash in 2007? It wouldn’t have been anything like the over-the-hill version we saw in Los Angeles a few years later.

Of course, Kobe stuck with the Lakers, who traded for Pau Gasol and won a couple more titles. Kobe led them to those championships, and he deserves credit for staying the course.

But, no matter what Durant decides this summer, remember all players consider as many options as they have in front of them. There’s nothing wrong with someone leaving a job for a better one when he has the ability to do so.

Even Kobe – a self-declared “Laker for life” – tried to do it.