Mark Jackson

Warriors have ‘no panic’ after 25-point loss in Dallas, their fourth straight

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The Warriors have been a nice surprise this season, playing better than most expected while winning enough games early to be in solid playoff position for essentially the entire year.

Things have changed recently, with the team suffering its fourth straight loss on Saturday at the hands of the Mavericks, and not really competing very much along the way in a game where the final deficit was 25 points.

Both the team’s All-Star big man David Lee and head coach Mark Jackson said there would be “no panic” afterward, but good teams aren’t supposed to get steamrolled by 20-plus points game after game, so there should be at least a certain level of concern.

From Art Garcia of Fox Sports Southwest:

“We have no panic, but it’s very frustrating,” David Lee said. “Not only losing four games in a row, but the manner in which we lost them. Every team goes through the up and downs during the season. The key for us is to figure it out sooner rather than later and have a good last game before the All-Star break.”

“We’re fine. There’s no panic,” [Jackson] said. “We lost another game, we didn’t play well, we made mistakes, we did not put together 48 minutes of basketball, but there’s going to be no panic. We’re going to regroup and be preparing for the next one.”

The losing isn’t too worrisome; it’s the way the Warriors are losing, getting blown out by teams that they probably should beat in two of the four losses during this current streak.

It started in Houston, where the Rockets hung 140 on the Warriors, and nearly set the NBA record for most three-pointers made in the game, before Jackson instructed his players to intentionally foul near the end of that contest to make sure that didn’t happen.

That game was followed by a 21-point loss in Oklahoma City the following night, where there’s no shame in losing to one of the league’s best in the Thunder. But the quickness with which the Warriors were dispatched wasn’t pretty, as OKC had 67 points on the scoreboard by halftime, just 24 hours after Houston had put up 77 over the game’s first two periods.

In Memphis two days later, Golden State looked much better, but was ultimately doomed by a 37-point second half of scoring where the team got virtually no help offensively beyond the play of Lee and Stephen Curry. This one wasn’t so bad, as the Grizzlies play hard-nosed defense, especially at home, and make things tough inside with their big man combination of Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol.

The loss in Dallas was one the team will likely blame on the schedule, as well as some injuries. It was the Warriors’ fourth game in five nights, and Jarrett Jack, who’s been huge for this team off the bench all season long, missed his third straight game due to injury. Andrew Bogut, still not cleared yet to play on the second night of back-to-back games, sat this one out, as well.

Jackson and Lee may be correct that there’s no reason to panic yet, despite the team’s season-high losing streak. After two days off, Golden State will get a chance to turn things around at home against the Rockets on Tuesday.

Now, if Houston comes into Oracle and comes away with another double-digit victory, especially after the way the last game between these two teams went down? Then it might indeed be time to allow panic to set in.

Chauncey Billups explains why not every player wants to go home

Dallas Mavericks v Denver Nuggets
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LeBron James did it and shook up the NBA — he returned home to Cleveland. That has led to fantasies other players want to do the same thing: Kevin Durant back to Washington D.C.; DeMar DeRozan or Russell Westbrook back to Los Angeles; Blake Griffin back to Oklahoma. And the list goes on.

Not every player wants to do it.

Chauncey Billups did. Billups is a Denver guy who returned to play for the Nuggets — and gets his number retired Wednesday night, a much-deserved honor — but in a letter to his young self at the Players’ Tribune Wednesday he explained that going home is fraught with peril.

“But in reality, playing at home as a 23-year-old professional is going to be less blessing and more curse. (There’s perception, again, for you.) It’s as simple as this: you’re just not going to be ready for Denver to be Your City. You’re going to think you’re ready — and they are too — but, trust me, you won’t be. You’re still going to be so young. You’re still going to be hanging out with your boys, doing your old thing. There are going to be those … hometown distractions. And those distractions will add up.”

“And you have to understand, Chaunce: It’s not just that you made it. It’s that your whole neighborhoodis going to feel like they made it. All of Park Hill is going to feel like they made it. And don’t get me wrong — that’s special. But at the wrong age, it can also be tough. It can be a lot to handle. And you’re going to be at that wrong age. You’re not going to be mature enough yet, or developed enough yet, to take on that mix of environments, those responsibilities, that role.

“You’re not going to be ready to lead.”

There are plenty of guys around the NBA who understand those distractions and how those can get in the way of off-season workouts, of time spent shoring up a weakness or developing a new shot, and how during the season they can be another thing that wears the body down.

Some guys can handle it. Some can’t.

Go read the entire letter from Billups. He talks about getting traded from the Celtics his rookie season, about playing for Mike D’Antoni, about how very rarely do veterans want to mentor younger players because they are fighting for the same piece of the pie.  Billups is honest.

And it’s great that Denver is rewarding him as they should.

Did Marcus Thornton steal free throws from Rockets teammate Clint Capela?

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Leandro Barbosa – guarding Marcus Thornton and fighting through a Clint Capela screen – was called for a foul in the first quarter of last night’s Warriors-Rockets game.

Thornton went to the line.

Should he have? Or should Capela have?

Perhaps, Thornton and Barbosa tangled, but it certainly appeared the contact primarily occurred between Barbosa and Capela. It looks like Barbosa tries to ram through Capela.

It also appears Capela thought he drew the foul. Watch him step toward the line before seeing Thornton there and taking his spot along the paint.

So, why would Thornton step in? He’s making 89% of his free throws to Capela’s 40%.

I’m honestly surprised players don’t try this maneuver more often. Refs have so much to keep track of. The worst consequence would be the refs shooing away Thornton and bringing Capela to the line.

Thornton made both free throws, but it didn’t matter. Houston was playing Golden State, which rolled to a victory.

Kanye West apologizes to Michael Jordan

performs at the 2015 iHeartRadio Music Festival at MGM Grand Garden Arena on September 18, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images for iHeartMedia
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Kanye West – when he isn’t tweeting to invalidate the claims of dozens of women on nothing more than his own suppositions – is tweeting to Michael Jordan

Mark Parker is CEO of Nike, a company that collaborated with West on the Air Yeezy before an unhappy West bolted for Adidas. Jordan, of course, is a Nike ally and known for the Jumpman logo on his brand.

That’s why Kanye rapped in “Facts:”

Yeezy, Yeezy, Yeezy just jumped over Jumpman

Yeezy, Yeezy, Yeezy just jumped over Jumpman

We bring you the important news.

(hat tip: Jovan Buha of Fox Sports)

Report: Kobe Bryant once wanted Lakers to trade him to defending champs or 60-win team

LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 29:  Kobe Bryant #24 of the Los Angeles Lakers drives to the basket past Tim Duncan #21 of the San Antonio Spurs in Game Five of the Western Conference Finals during the 2008 NBA Playoffs on May 29, 2008 at Staples Center in Los Angeles, California.  The Lakers won 100-92.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
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Kevin Durant has taken plenty of criticism for his reported interest in signing with the Warriors.

Don’t chase a ring by just bolting for the best team. Build up your own team. Kobe Bryant would never do that.

Well…

Kobe Bryant requested a trade from the Lakers in 2007 – when the Cavaliers tried trading everyone but LeBron James for him – and the Bulls were Kobe’s top choice. Kobe had a no-trade clause, so he had some power to choose his next team. The rest of his list?

Kobe, via Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

It was Chicago, San Antonio (or) Phoenix.

The Spurs were reigning NBA champions, and the Suns were coming off a 61-win season. These teams were the class of the league.

They also had strong offensive identities – Gregg Popovich’s ball-movement-happy system in San Antonio and Mike D’Antoni’s up-tempo attack in Phoenix. How would Kobe have fit? Now, that’s a great what-if – especially because both teams had the assets to create intriguing trade packages.

The Spurs could’ve built an offer around Tony Parker and/or Manu Ginobili, the Suns around Shawn Marion and/or Amar’e Stoudemire. Could you imagine Kobe and Tim Duncan or Kobe and Steve Nash in 2007? It wouldn’t have been anything like the over-the-hill version we saw in Los Angeles a few years later.

Of course, Kobe stuck with the Lakers, who traded for Pau Gasol and won a couple more titles. Kobe led them to those championships, and he deserves credit for staying the course.

But, no matter what Durant decides this summer, remember all players consider as many options as they have in front of them. There’s nothing wrong with someone leaving a job for a better one when he has the ability to do so.

Even Kobe – a self-declared “Laker for life” – tried to do it.