James Harden

The Houston Rockets tie the NBA record for most 3-pointers, blow past Golden State

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We thought Rockets-Warriors might be a shootout, but this was more like the grand finale of a fireworks show for a full 48 minutes. Behind a record trying 3-point performance, the Rockets issued a 140-109 beatdown of the Golden State Warriors in Houston. Let’s allow the numbers to tell the story:

77

We probably should have known something was up when the Rockets dropped 77 points by halftime. So far this season, 45 teams have scored less than 77 points over the course of an entire game. It took the Rockets just 24 minutes to hit that mark on Tuesday night.

14

The Rockets shot a ridiculous 14-for-18 from behind the arc in the first half, peppering the ball around the perimeter and playing drive and kick basketball. The 14 3-pointers in a half tied an NBA record.

17

You would think the Warriors would start chasing shooters off the line a little better, but the Rockets just kept on firing in the second half. Houston eclipsed the previous franchise record of 17 3-pointers when Toney Douglas nailed one from the corner….in the third quarter. It’s not very often you see a prominent NBA franchise snap a single-game record in the third quarter, but the Rockets didn’t stop there.

23

The 2008-2009 Orlando Magic club held the NBA record for most 3-pointers in a game. The Magic hit 23 shots from behind the arc in a 139-107 win over the Sacramento Kings on January 13th of 2009. While Jeremy Lin, James Harden and Chandler Parsons combined for 13 3-pointers on their own, it would be up to Houston’s reserves to try and break the NBA record, mainly because Golden State couldn’t quite keep pace. With the starters out, seldom used backup big man Donatas Motiejunas nailed a 3 with 3:41 left in the game to tie the NBA record.

24?

With ample time left on the clock, the Rockets had a few shots at the record. Patrick Beverley missed a 3-pointer on the very next possession, and then Marcus Morris missed one on the offensive rebound. After that, Golden State decided they wouldn’t have an NBA record set against them, and they started letting Houston do anything but shoot 3-pointers. Beverley, who was likely happy to just be out there, took full advantage of the open lanes by driving to the rim again and again. Things started to get a bit testy though…

:34

With 34 seconds left, Beverley went to attempt a record-breaking 3-pointer at the urging of the crowd. However, Warriors forward Draymond Green didn’t take too kindly to it all and committed a hard foul to prevent the attempt. Words were understandably exchanged, and Green and Marcus Morris were both ejected from the game. Houston would end up getting one more possession, but Golden State intentionally fouled right away to deny the Rockets of their shot at history.

5

Jeremy Lin set a new career-high with 5 made 3-pointers. Lin is just a career 29.7 percent 3-point shooter, but he connected on 5-for-8 in the win over the team he started his career with.

140

The 140 points scored by the Rockets is the most by an NBA team this season, and the most points in regulation by any team since 2010, when the Pacers defeated the Nuggets 144-113.

35

The Rockets tied the NBA record for most 3-pointers by going 23-of-40 from the land of plenty, but they also set a team season high for assists with 35. The fact that the Rockets assisted on 35 of 46 made field goals and turned it over just 8 times should give you a sense of just how dominant of an offensive performance this was. Oddly enough, the Rockets had more assists (35) than points in the paint (34). How often does that happen?

Three Hawks lose uncontested rebound out of bounds (video)

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How did Mike Scott, Mike Dunleavy and Malcolm Delaney fail to secure this rebound?

No wonder the Hawks lost to a Clippers team playing without Chris Paul and Blake Griffin.

James Harden makes impressive chase-down block. Really. (video)

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If we’re going to post all of James Harden‘s defensive lowlights, it’s only fair to acknowledge this impressive block.

Please overlook the fact that Jason Terry is 39 years old.

Steven Adams posterizes Rudy Gobert AND Derrick Favors with one thunderous dunk (video)

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Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors form an impressive defensive tandem that usually walls off the paint.

If there were any walls here, Steven Adams jumped right over them.

Video Breakdown: How Kyle Lowry dismantles NBA defenses from 3-point range

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Toronto Raptors star Kyle Lowry is arguably the team’s best player thanks in large part to his increase in 3-point shooting ability this season. He’s just above 43 percent from deep this year, much better than his career average of 36 percent. Lowry has increased his 3-point percentage six points over last season, and he’s a big part of why the Raptors are so good on offense, and why they’re a contender in the Eastern Conference.

So how does he do it?

Watch the full video breakdown on Lowry’s 3-point shooting above, or read the text version of the article below.

Early Offense

I looked at a lot of tape of Lowry over the last 3 years and he hasn’t changed much on his shot mechanics. There’s no big change in his sweep or sway toward the basket when he shoots, and he still brings the ball up from his left side.

Part of his leap is be how quickly he’s getting his shots off and how many of his early offense field goal attempts come in the form of 3-pointers.

Lowry has bumped up how many 3-pointers he’s taken in the early offense, recorded here as between 24 and 15 seconds on the shot clock. Year-over-year he’s taken nearly eight percent more of his field goals as three pointers in this range.

This takes form on the court in a couple of ways, both in transition on the fast break and on quick 1 or 2 dribble pull ups off the pick-and-roll.

Transition

With the ball in secondary transition here, Lowry gets a quick screen from DeMarre Carroll to open him up for a 3-point bucket against the Hornets. And that’s still with 18 seconds left on the shot clock!

Pull-up and off-the-bounce jumpers

The other way Lowry scores quickly is off the dribble, with quick pick and rolls. Toronto is great at screen assists — picks leading to an immediate field goal — and have three players in the Top 50 and two in the Top 10 in setting them.

Here, the Celtics defender cuts off Lowry’s attack to the middle of the floor. The screener sets up to Lowry’s right, but then quickly flips it to his left. One dribble, and it’s an easy 3-pointer.

Here against Portland, the Raptors run a two screen setup with one wing and one post. The Blazers make the switch and try to blitz Lowry, but he stays resilient and sinks the bucket with what little space they allow him anyway.

Working with DeMar DeRozan

The other thing that’s been talked about a lot is the gravity of DeMar DeRozan, who himself is having a career year for the Raptors. While Lowry is making a ton of unassisted 3-pointers this year, the Raptors point guard does benefit from DeMar.

Part of that is how good they are in transition together.

Here you can see DeMar bringing the ball up the court with Lowry in front of him. He sets the screen, then fades to the arc. Three Utah Jazz are trying to stop DeRozan, and Lowry is left all alone.

When he’s not the primary ball handler on the break, Lowry will immediately get out to the wing. DeRozan has a way of finding him to get up quick Js.

Of course, in good old set plays the Raptors see this gravity effect as well.

Here Toronto is running another double screen with a guard and a post, but Lowry is one of the screeners. At this point, all three Heat players are guarding against DeRozan’s midrange jumper, leaving just enough daylight for Lowry.

Toronto is also third in the NBA in “hockey” or secondary assists, which means two or more passes leading to a made field goal.

On this baseline out of bounds play, again it’s DeRozan’s gravity that frees up Lowry. As the ball is inbounded, DeRozan sucks three warriors defenders with him, including Lowry’s. Meanwhile, Kyle is running down the baseline to get a bucket off a pass on the opposite side of the floor. All the raps have to do is rotate the ball.

So that’s a little bit on why Kyle Lowry has been so good. It’s been about shot selection, decisiveness, and some practice in addition to the effectiveness of his teammates.