Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry bites a mouth piece during the first quarter of his NBA basketball game against Los Angeles Lakers in Oakland

UPDATED: Stephen Curry, Andrew Bogut, Harrison Barnes out for Warriors Tuesday


UPDATE 5:49 pm: Warriors coach Mark Jackson met with the media and said that Stephen Curry and, as expected, Andrew Bogut were out for Golden State on Tuesday in Cleveland, tweets Sam Amico of Fox Sports Ohio.

Harrison Barnes, who had a mild calf tweak, also is out, Jackson said.

That’s a lot of bodies out for the Warriors, taking on a Cavaliers team playing well behind a very hot Kyrie Irving.

5:11 pm: Stephen Curry, who tweaked his ankle on Monday night and sat out the fourth quarter of a Warriors win in Toronto, is questionable for Tuesday night’s game in Cleveland, with the decision coming near game time, reports

Andrew Bogut — who looked pretty good on Monday night — was never going to play Tuesday when the Warriors traveled to Cleveland. Monday was Bogut’s first game back from ankle surgery and he is not taking part in any back-to-backs before the All-Star Game.

When Curry tweaked his right a couple of weeks ago, he sat out a couple of games. That he did this again a few weeks later has to be a concern to the Warriors. Look for them to be cautious with him.

Curry missed large parts of last season and had a couple of surgeries on his right ankle, and he wears a heavy brace. Still he was able to roll it some when he stepped on the foot of Ed Davis while driving to the hole.

If Curry is out it means more Jarrett Jack, which is certainly not that bad. Still, Golden State would miss Curry’s 21 points and 6.5 assists per game, not to mention his 45.4 percent shooting from three. Curry has had an All-Star caliber season, but didn’t get picked in a tough field with Tony Parker, Russell Westbrook and James Harden as reserve guards (fans voted Kobe Bryant and Chris Paul the starters).

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.